Thornburg Historic District

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Thornburg Historic District

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Thornburg School
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Location Off Pennsylvania Route 60, Thornburg, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°25′56.97″N80°4′59.76″W / 40.4324917°N 80.0832667°W / 40.4324917; -80.0832667 Coordinates: 40°25′56.97″N80°4′59.76″W / 40.4324917°N 80.0832667°W / 40.4324917; -80.0832667
Built circa 1820 to 1840
Architectural style Bungalow/Craftsman, Queen Anne
NRHP reference # 82001529 [1]
Added to NRHP December 8, 1982

Thornburg Historic District is a historic district in Thornburg, Pennsylvania. It was planned as a suburban development in the early 20th century and has 75 contributing buildings, all but one residential. Though only 4 miles from downtown Pittsburgh, the district remains intact as an example of early suburban development. The majority of houses were built in the Bungalow or Shingle styles, with others in the Queen Anne, Craftsman, Colonial, Mission or Tudor styles.

Thornburg, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Thornburg is a borough in Allegheny County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The population was 455 at the 2010 census.

Pittsburgh City in western Pennsylvania

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The Thornburg School was built in 1910 to the design of Press C. Dowler in the Mission style. It was used as a school until 1971 and continues to be used as a community center. [2] [3]

Cousins Frank and David Thornburg developed the approximately 250 acres, starting about 1900. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 8, 1982. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "A Brief History of Thornburg". Borough of Thornburg. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  3. Smith, Eliza; Lu Donnelly (1980). "Thornburg Historic District" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved January 10, 2014.