Thornton W. Burgess House

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Thornton W. Burgess House
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Location Hampden, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°3′48″N72°24′24″W / 42.06333°N 72.40667°W / 42.06333; -72.40667 Coordinates: 42°3′48″N72°24′24″W / 42.06333°N 72.40667°W / 42.06333; -72.40667
Area 18 acres (7.3 ha)
Built 1780 (1780)
Architect Calvin Stebbins
NRHP reference # 83000740 [1]
Added to NRHP April 21, 1983

The Thornton W. Burgess House is a historic house at 789 Main Street in Hampden, Massachusetts. Built between 1780 and 1784, it is a well-preserved vernacular house built by one of the area's early settlers, and was for many years home to children's author Thornton Burgess. The property is now owned by the Massachusetts Audubon Society, which uses it for staff housing. It is adjacent to the Society's Laughing Brook Wildlife Sanctuary. [2] [3] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. [1]

Hampden, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Hampden is a town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 5,139 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts Metropolitan Statistical Area. The namesake of Hampden is John Hampden, an English patriot.

Thornton Burgess American conservationist

Thornton Waldo Burgess was an American conservationist and author of children's stories. Burgess loved the beauty of nature and its living creatures so much that he wrote about them for 50 years in books and his newspaper column, Bedtime Stories. He was sometimes known as the Bedtime Story-Man. By the time he retired, he had written more than 170 books and 15,000 stories for the daily newspaper column.

Massachusetts Audubon Society nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection of the nature of Massachusetts

The Massachusetts Audubon Society, founded in 1896 by Harriet Hemenway and Minna Hall, headquartered in Lincoln, Massachusetts, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to "protecting the nature of Massachusetts". Mass Audubon is independent of the National Audubon Society, and was founded earlier. Mass Audubon protects 36,500 acres of land throughout Massachusetts, saving birds and other wildlife, and making nature accessible to all with its wildlife sanctuaries and 20 nature centers.

Contents

Description and history

The Thornton W. Burgess House is located east of the village center of Hampden, on the north side of Main Street a short way west of its junction with Glendale Road. It is a simple 1-1/2 story Cape style house, with a side gable roof, shingled exterior, and central chimney. The main facade is three bays wide, with a central entrance topped by a transom window. Interior features include a narrow winding staircase in the entry vestibule, and a large fireplace with beehive oven in the main chamber. Some interior doors consist of wide wooden boards attached to hand wrought iron hinges. [4]

The house is one of the oldest houses in Hampden (built between 1780 and 1784), and is noted as the longtime home of children's author Thornton Burgess. It was built by Calvin Stebbins, whose uncle was one of Hampden's first settlers. Thornton Burgess purchased the house in 1928, and used it has a summer residence until 1955, when he made it his year-round residence. He established his writing studio in one of the outbuildings on the property, and produced many of his best-known works here. After his death in 1965, the local Lions Club bought the property to prevent its development, and eventually turned it over to the Audubon Society. [4]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Hampden County, Massachusetts Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Hampden County, Massachusetts.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "MACRIS inventory record for Thornton W. Burgess House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2013-12-10.
  3. "About Laughing Brook". Massachusetts Audubon Society. Retrieved 2013-12-10.
  4. 1 2 "NRHP nomination for Thornton W. Burgess House". National Archive. Retrieved 2018-02-17.