Threefork Bridge, West Virginia

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Threefork Bridge
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Threefork Bridge
Location within the state of West Virginia
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Threefork Bridge
Threefork Bridge (the United States)
Coordinates: 39°26′25″N79°50′58″W / 39.44028°N 79.84944°W / 39.44028; -79.84944 Coordinates: 39°26′25″N79°50′58″W / 39.44028°N 79.84944°W / 39.44028; -79.84944
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Preston
Elevation
1,289 ft (393 m)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
GNIS ID 1555810 [1]

Threefork Bridge is an unincorporated community in Preston County, West Virginia.

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