Thyridia repens

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Thyridia repens
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Phrymaceae
Genus: Thyridia
W.R.Barker & Beardsley
Species:T. repens
Binomial name
Thyridia repens
(R.Br.) W.R.Barker & Beardsley
Synonyms [1]

Thyridia repens, with common names creeping monkeyflower, [2] Native musk, Maori musk, and native monkey flower, is a herbaceous succulent plant native to New Zealand and Australia that grows as low mats. [3] Its flowers are light purple or white. [3] It is the only species in the genus Thyridia. [1]

Succulent plant plants having some parts that are more than normally thickened and fleshy

In botany, succulent plants, also known as succulents, are plants that have some parts that are more than normally thickened and fleshy, usually to retain water in arid climates or soil conditions. The word "succulent" comes from the Latin word sucus, meaning juice, or sap. Succulent plants may store water in various structures, such as leaves and stems. Some definitions also include roots, thus geophytes that survive unfavorable periods by dying back to underground storage organs may be regarded as succulents. In horticultural use, the term "succulent" is sometimes used in a way which excludes plants that botanists would regard as succulents, such as cacti. Succulents are often grown as ornamental plants because of their striking and unusual appearance.

Taxonomy

Thyridia is one of several genera that have been separated from an earlier concept of Mimulus as a large genus within family Phrymaceae. [4]

<i>Mimulus</i> genus of plants

Mimulus is a plant genus in the family Phrymaceae, which was traditionally placed in family Scrophulariaceae. The genus now contains only seven species, two native to eastern North America and the other five native to Asia, Australia, Africa, or Madagascar. In the past, about 150 species were placed in this genus, most of which have since been assigned to other genera, the majority to genus Erythranthe. Mimulus species prefer wet or moist areas and are not drought resistant. Several are cultivated as ornamental garden plants.

Related Research Articles

<i>Diplacus aurantiacus</i> species of flowering plant

Diplacus aurantiacus, the sticky monkey-flower or orange bush monkey-flower, is a flowering plant that grows in a subshrub form, native to southwestern North America from southwestern Oregon south through most of California. It is a member of the lopseed family, Phrymaceae. It was formerly known as Mimulus aurantiacus.

<i>Diplacus rupicola</i> species of plant

Diplacus rupicola, the Death Valley monkeyflower, is a flowering plant in the family Phrymaceae.

<i>Diplacus bigelovii</i> species of plant

Diplacus bigelovii is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Bigelow's monkeyflower. It is native to the southwestern United States, where it grows in desert and slope habitats. It was formerly known as Mimulus bigelovii.

<i>Erythranthe breviflora</i> species of plant

Erythranthe breviflora is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name shortflower monkeyflower. It is native to western North America from British Columbia to Wyoming to the Modoc Plateau and northern Sierra Nevada in California. It grows in moist areas in several types of habitat. It was formerly known as Mimulus breviflorus.

<i>Diplacus brevipes</i> species of plant

Diplacus brevipes is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name widethroat yellow monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus brevipes.

Erythranthe breweri is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Brewer's monkeyflower. It is native to western North America from British Columbia to California to Colorado, where it grows in moist spots in several habitat types. This is a hairy annual herb producing a thin, erect stem up to 21 centimeters tall. The herbage is reddish green in color. The paired opposite leaves are linear in shape and up to 3.5 centimeters long. The plant bears small tubular flowers, each with its base encapsulated in a lightly hairy calyx of sepals with tiny equal lobes at its mouth. The five-lobed flower corolla is just a few millimeters long and light purplish pink in color, often with darker spots in the throat. It was formerly known as Mimulus breweri.

Diplacus clevelandii is an uncommon species of monkeyflower known by the common name Cleveland's bush monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus clevelandii.

<i>Erythranthe floribunda</i> species of plant

Erythranthe floribunda is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name many-flowered monkeyflower. It is native to western North America from western Canada to California and northern Mexico, to the Rocky Mountains. It grows in many types of habitat, especially moist areas. It was formerly known as Mimulus floribundus.

<i>Diplacus fremontii</i> species of plant

Diplacus fremontii is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Frémont's monkeyflower. It is native to California and Baja California, where it grows in mountain and desert habitat, especially moist or disturbed areas. It was formerly known as Mimulus fremontii.

<i>Diplacus mephiticus</i> species of plant

Diplacus mephiticus is a species of monkeyflower known by the common names skunky monkeyflower and foul odor monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus mephiticus.

<i>Diplacus nanus</i> species of plant

Diplacus nanus is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name dwarf purple monkeyflower. It is native to California and the Northwestern United States to Montana. It grows in moist habitat, often in bare or disturbed soils. It was formerly known as Mimulus nanus.

Diplacus pictus is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name calico monkeyflower.

Erythranthe pilosus species of plant

Mimetanthe pilosa is a species of monkeyflower known by the common names false monkeyflower and downy mimetanthe. It is native to the western United States and Baja California, where it grows in moist and disturbed habitat types. This plant is different enough from other monkeyflowers that it is often treated in its own monotypic genus, Mimetanthe or retained in Mimulus. It was formerly known as Mimulus pilosus.

<i>Diplacus pygmaeus</i> species of plant

Diplacus pygmaeus is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Egg Lake monkeyflower.

<i>Erythranthe rubella</i> species of plant

Erythranthe rubella is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name little redstem monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus rubellus.

<i>Erythranthe shevockii</i> species of plant

Erythranthe shevockii is a rare species of monkeyflower known by the common name Kelso Creek monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus shevockii.

<i>Erythranthe tilingii</i> species of plant

Erythranthe tilingii is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Tiling's monkeyflower. It was formerly known as Mimulus tilingii.

<i>Diplacus tricolor</i> species of plant

Diplacus tricolor is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name tricolor monkeyflower. It is native to Oregon and California. It grows in seasonally wet habitats such as meadows and vernal pools, including those in the San Joaquin Valley and near north coast oak woodlands. It was formerly known as Mimulus tricolor.

<i>Erythranthe lutea</i> species of plant

Erythranthe lutea is a species of monkeyflower also known as yellow monkeyflower, monkey musk, blotched monkey flowers, and blood-drop-emlets. It was formerly known as Mimulus luteus.

References

  1. 1 2 Barker, W.R.; Nesom, G.L.; Beardsley, P.M.; Fraga, N.S. (2012), "A taxonomic conspectus of Phrymaceae: A narrowed circumscriptions for Mimulus, new and resurrected genera, and new names and combinations" (PDF), Phytoneuron, 2012-39: 1–60
  2. PlantNET: New South Wales Flora Online , retrieved 9 February 2017
  3. 1 2 "Thyridia repens", New Zealand Plant Conservation Network, retrieved 9 February 2017
  4. Beardsley, Paul M.; Olmstead, Richard G. (July 2002). "Redefining Phrymaceae: the placement of Mimulus, tribe Mimuleae, and Phryma". American Journal of Botany. 89 (7): 1093–1102. doi:10.3732/ajb.89.7.1093 . Retrieved 26 June 2012.