Thysanotus multiflorus

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Thysanotus multiflorus
Thysanotus multiflorus (6280148591).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Lomandroideae
Genus: Thysanotus
Species:
T. multiflorus
Binomial name
Thysanotus multiflorus

Thysanotus multiflorus, is a monoecious perennial flowering plant with long stems accompanied with a cluster of foliage underneath. This plant is endemic to the Southwest Australia. The flowers of the plant are bright mauve and there are 3 petals, each decorated with fringed edges.

Endemism Ecological state of being unique to a defined geographic location or habitat

Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species that are restricted to a defined geographical area.

Contents

Distribution

Thysanotus multiflorus originates from Southwestern Australia, southeast of Perth. It is considered to be distributed in the IBRA regions, Avon Wheatbelt, Esperance Plains, Jarrah Forest, Swan Coastal Plain and Warren. [1]

Avon Wheatbelt Bioregion

The Avon Wheatbelt is an Australian bioregion in Western Australia and part of the larger Southwest Australia savanna ecoregion.

Esperance Plains biogeographic region of Australia

Esperance Plains, also known as Eyre Botanical District, is a biogeographic region in southern Western Australia on the south coast between the Avon Wheatbelt and Hampton regions, and bordered to the north by the Mallee region. It is a plain punctuated by granite and quartz outcrops and ranges, with a semi-arid Mediterranean climate and vegetation consisting mostly of mallee-heath and proteaceous scrub. About half of the region has been cleared for intensive agriculture. Recognised as a bioregion under the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA), it was first defined by John Stanley Beard in 1980.

Jarrah Forest Australian bioregion located in South West Western Australia.

Jarrah Forest is an interim Australian bioregion located in Western Australia. The Jarrah Forest comprises reserves across the south-west corner of WA and is managed for uses including recreation. There are many small areas of parkland while larger protected areas include the Dryandra Woodland, Lane-Poole Reserve, and the Perup Forest Ecology Centre. Also managed for land uses such as water, timber and mineral production, recreation and conservation, the forest is recognised globally as a significant hotspot of plant biodiversity and endemism.

Habitat and ecology

Thysanotus multiflorus flourishes in a dry climate with low humidity. This plant grows in a region that has a Mediterranean climate with wet winters and dry summers. [2] The Government of Western Australia's Department of Environment and Conservation considers the plants conservation code to be not threatened. [3] Thysanotus multiflorus is able to grow in soil that has excellent drainage, but is also able to grow in more sandy soil. However, if the soil is too fine, it may cause the roots to rot. [4]

Mediterranean climate Type of climate

A Mediterranean climate or dry summer climate is characterized by dry summers and mild, wet winters. The climate receives its name from the Mediterranean Basin, where this climate type is most common. Mediterranean climate zones are typically located along the western sides of continents, between roughly 30 and 45 degrees north and south of the equator. The main cause of Mediterranean, or dry summer climate, is the subtropical ridge which extends northwards during the summer and migrates south during the winter due to increasing north-south temperature differences.

Government of Western Australia state government of Western Australia

The Government of Western Australia, formally referred to as Her Majesty's Government of Western Australia, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of Western Australia. It is also commonly referred to as the WA Government or the Western Australian Government. The Government of Western Australia, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1890 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, Western Australia has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth. Under the Australian Constitution, Western Australia ceded legislative and judicial supremacy to the Commonwealth, but retained powers in all matters not in conflict with the Commonwealth.

Department of Environment and Conservation (Western Australia) defunct state government department of Western Australia

The Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) was a department of the Government of Western Australia that was responsible for implementing the state's conservation and environment legislation and regulations. It was formed on 1 July 2006 by the amalgamation of the Department of Environment and the Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Morphology

Thysanotus multiflorus has fibrous roots. It has clusters of bright flowers with 3 mauve-colored elliptic petals and fringed edges. Each flower usually contains 3 stamens with long curved anthers and equal filaments. The style is also curved and usually seen pointing in the opposite direction of the anthers. The cylindrical seeds are accompanied by stalked arils. [5] The stems of the flowers can grow up to 14 inches and underneath is a clump of foliage without flowers. [6] The foliage tends to be glossy and smooth.

Fibrous root system

A fibrous root system is the opposite of a taproot system. It is usually formed by thin, moderately branching roots growing from the stem. A fibrous root system is universal in monocotyledonous plants and ferns. The fibrous root systems look like a mat made out of roots when the tree has reached full maturity.

Mauve mauve colour

Mauve is a pale purple color named after the mallow flower. The first use of the word mauve as a color was in 1796–98 according to the Oxford English Dictionary, but its use seems to have been rare before 1859. Another name for the color is mallow, with the first recorded use of mallow as a color name in English in 1611.

Aril

An aril, also called an arillus, is a specialized outgrowth from a seed that partly or completely covers the seed. An arillode or false aril is sometimes distinguished: whereas an aril grows from the attachment point of the seed to the ovary, an arillode forms from a different point on the seed coat. The term "aril" is sometimes applied to any fleshy appendage of the seed in flowering plants, such as the mace of the nutmeg seed. Arils and arillodes are often edible enticements that encourage animals to transport the seed, thereby assisting in seed dispersal. Pseudarils are aril-like structures commonly found on the pyrenes of Burseraceae species that develop from the mesocarp of the ovary. The fleshy, edible pericarp splits neatly in two halves, then falling away or being eaten to reveal a brightly coloured pseudaril around the black seed.

Usage

This plant is usually used in horticulture.

Related Research Articles

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<i>Levenhookia preissii</i> species of plant

Levenhookia preissii, Preiss's stylewort, is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the genus Levenhookia. It is an ephemeral annual that grows about 15 centimetres (5.9 in) tall with oblanceolate to linear leaves. Flowers are pink to red and bloom from September to January in its native range. L. preissii is endemic to southwestern Western Australia where it grows in grey or black sandy peat soils in swampy areas.

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<i>Regelia velutina</i> species of plant

Regelia velutina, commonly known as Barrens regelia, a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a large shrub with greyish green, velvety leaves and large clusters of brilliant red to orange flowers on the ends of its branches in spring and summer.

<i>Gastrolobium leakeanum</i> species of plant

Gastrolobium leakeanum commonly known as mountain pea is a plant in the pea family Fabaceae growing as an erect or sprawling shrub to about 2 metres (1.5 ft) high with red to orange–yellow flowers in spring. It is endemic to a limited area of the south–west of Western Australia.

<i>Calectasia cyanea</i> species of plant

Calectasia cyanea, commonly known as the star of Bethlehem or blue tinsel lily, is a plant in the family Dasypogonaceae growing as a perennial herb and is endemic to the south–west of Western Australia. Restricted to a single population in Torndirrup National Park, it is critically endangered.

Regelia ciliata is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a rigid, spreading shrub with paper-like bark on the stems, tiny wedge shaped leaves and dense heads of mauve flowers in spring and summer.

<i>Regelia inops</i> species of plant

Regelia inops is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an upright but often spreading shrub with tiny wedge shaped leaves and small heads of pink flowers on the ends of its branches in the warmer months.

Eremophila adenotricha, commonly known as glandular-haired eremophila, is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to a small area in the south-west of Western Australia. It is an erect shrub with sticky, aromatic leaves and pink, blue or purple flowers. It is a rarely seen shrub, apparently short-lived, mostly occurring in open, disturbed areas.

<i>Eremophila canaliculata</i> species of plant

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<i>Eremophila citrina</i> species of plant

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<i>Eremophila conferta</i> species of plant

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<i>Eremophila recurva</i> species of plant

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References

  1. Paczkowska, Grazyna. "Thysanotus multiflorus R.Br". Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australian Herbarium. Retrieved 26 April 2012.
  2. Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government. "Climate of Western Australia". Commonwealth of Australia. Archived from the original on 17 March 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  3. Paczkowska, Grazyna. "Thysanotus scabers R.Br". Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australian Herbarium. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  4. "Thysanotus". The Ramm Botanicals Trust.Missing or empty |url= (help)
  5. Brittan, N.H. "Thysanotus multiflorus R.Br., Prodr. 285 (1810)". Flora of Australia. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  6. "Thysanotus Multiflorus Many Flowered Fringe Lily 8seeds". Georgia Vines. Retrieved 27 April 2012.