Timeline of Wilmington, North Carolina

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Wilmington, North Carolina, United States.

Contents

18th-19th centuries

20th century

21st century

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">New Hanover County, North Carolina</span> County in North Carolina, United States

New Hanover County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 225,702. Though the second-smallest county in North Carolina by land area, it is one of the most populous, as its county seat, Wilmington, is one of the state's largest cities. The county was created in 1729 as New Hanover Precinct and gained county status in 1739. New Hanover County is included in the Wilmington, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which also includes neighboring Pender County.

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Brunswick County is the southernmost county in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 136,693. Its population was only 73,143 in 2000, making it one of the fastest-growing counties in the state. With a nominal growth rate of approximately 47% in ten years, much of the growth is centered in the eastern section of the county in the suburbs of Wilmington such as Leland, Belville and Southport. The county seat is Bolivia, which at a population of around 150 people is among the least populous county seats in the state.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wilmington, North Carolina</span> City in North Carolina, United States

Wilmington is a port city in and the county seat of New Hanover County in coastal southeastern North Carolina, United States. With a population of 115,451 in the 2020 census, it is the eighth-most populous city in the state. Wilmington is the principal city of the Wilmington, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes New Hanover and Pender counties in southeastern North Carolina, which had a population of 285,905 in 2020.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Interstate 140 (North Carolina)</span> Highway in North Carolina

Interstate 140 (I-140) and North Carolina Highway 140 (NC 140) is a 25.4-mile (40.9 km) auxiliary Interstate Highway and state highway in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Officially designated the John Jay Burney Jr. Freeway, it serves as a bypass of Wilmington. The western terminus of the highway is at U.S. Route 17 (US 17) near Winnabow. It heads north in western Leland before turning to the east north of an interchange with U.S. Route 74 (US 74)/U.S. Route 76 (US 76). I-140 crosses the Cape Fear River north of Navassa and the Northeast Cape Fear River northwest of Wrightsboro. I-140 ends at Interstate 40 (I-40), and the route number changes to NC 140. NC 140 continues to the east, ending at US 17 in Kirkland.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">North Carolina Highway 132</span> State highway in New Hanover County, North Carolina, US

North Carolina Highway 132 (NC 132) is a north-south North Carolina State Highway entirely in New Hanover County. The highway follows College Road for the duration of its route. The southern terminus of NC 132 begins at U.S. Route 421 (US 421) in the census-designated place of Myrtle Grove south of Wilmington. Continuing north, NC 132 continues along a major north-south artillery road in the city of Wilmington. Between Shipyard Boulevard and its northern terminus, NC 132 runs concurrently with US 117. NC 132 shares a short concurrency at the eastern terminus of Interstate 40 (I-40), before continuing north toward Castle Hayne. The northern terminus of NC 132 is located at a roundabout with US 117 and NC 133 just south of the main business district of Castle Hayne.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cape Fear (region)</span> Wilmington metropolitan area

Cape Fear is a coastal plain and Tidewater region of North Carolina centered about the city of Wilmington. The region takes its name from the adjacent Cape Fear headland, as does the Cape Fear River which flows through the region and empties into the Atlantic Ocean near the cape. Much of the region's populated areas are found along the Atlantic beaches and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, while the rural areas are dominated by farms and swampland like that of the Green Swamp. The general area can be also identified by the titles "Lower Cape Fear", "Wilmington, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area", "Southeastern North Carolina", and "Azalea Coast". The latter name is derived from the North Carolina Azalea Festival held annually in Wilmington. Municipalities in the area belong to the Cape Fear Council of Governments.

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James Innes was an American military commander and political figure in the Province of North Carolina who led troops both at home and abroad in the service of the Kingdom of Great Britain. Innes was given command of a company of North Carolina's provincial soldiers during the War of Jenkins' Ear, and served as Commander-in-Chief of all colonial soldiers in the Ohio River Valley in 1754 during the French and Indian War. After resigning his commission in 1756, Innes retired to his home on the Cape Fear River. A bequest made by Innes upon his death lead to the establishment of Innes Academy in Wilmington, North Carolina.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Wilmington History". City of Wilmington, North Carolina. Retrieved May 9, 2017. (Timeline)
  2. 1 2 3 Britannica 1910.
  3. 1 2 Cumming, William P. (1969). "The Turbulent Life of Captain James Wimble". The North Carolina Historical Review. 46 (1): 1–18. ISSN   0029-2494.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hellmann 2006.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  6. 1 2 3 4 "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America . Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  7. "This Day in Weather History". Aberdeen, South Dakota: National Weather Service . Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  8. Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  9. Wilmington Cemetery Tells Tale of a North Carolina Epidemic Retrieved May 9, 2020
  10. Tetterton 2010.
  11. Century of Stories: New Hanover County Public Library 1906-2006, 2006
  12. 1 2 "Movie Theaters in Wilmington, NC". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  13. Jack Alicoate, ed. (1939), "Standard Broadcasting Stations of the United States: North Carolina", Radio Annual, New York: Radio Daily, OCLC   2459636 Lock-green.svg
  14. Charles A. Alicoate, ed. (1960), "Television Stations: North Carolina", Radio Annual and Television Year Book, New York: Radio Daily Corp., OCLC   10512206 Lock-green.svg
  15. 1 2 American Association for State and Local History (2002). "North Carolina". Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada (15th ed.). ISBN   0759100020.
  16. 1 2 North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. "This Day in North Carolina History" . Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  17. "North Carolina". Official Congressional Directory. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1997. hdl:2027/mdp.39015038905678 via HathiTrust.
  18. "Welcome to Wilmington, NC". Archived from the original on December 6, 1998 via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  19. Kevin Hyde; Tamie Hyde (eds.). "United States of America: North Carolina". Official City Sites. Utah. OCLC   40169021. Archived from the original on August 24, 2000.
  20. "Wilmington city, North Carolina". QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  21. Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack . Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 9, 2017.

Bibliography