Trowbridge-Badger House

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Trowbridge-Badger House
Winchester MA Trowbridge Badger House.JPG
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Location Winchester, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°26′49″N71°8′0″W / 42.44694°N 71.13333°W / 42.44694; -71.13333 Coordinates: 42°26′49″N71°8′0″W / 42.44694°N 71.13333°W / 42.44694; -71.13333
Built 1886
Architect Unknown
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Queen Anne
MPS Winchester MRA
NRHP reference #

89000647

[1]
Added to NRHP July 5, 1989

The Trowbridge-Badger House is a historic house at 12 Prospect Street in Winchester, Massachusetts. The large 2.5 story house was built c. 1886, and is an excellent local representative of predominantly Queen Anne styling with Colonial Revival features. The house's irregular roof line, with many gables and projecting sections, is typically Queen Anne, while the shingled porch with Tuscan columns is Colonial Revival. Little is known of its early owners beyond their names. [2]

Winchester, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Winchester is a small suburban town located 8.2 miles north of downtown Boston, Massachusetts, United States in Middlesex County. It is the 7th wealthiest municipality in Massachusetts and functions largely as a bedroom community for professionals who work in the greater Boston area. The population was 21,374 at the 2010 United States Census.

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Winchester, Massachusetts Wikimedia list article

This is a list of properties and historic districts in Winchester, Massachusetts, that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Trowbridge-Badger House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-03-18.