U.S. News & World Report

Last updated
U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report logo.png
Owner(s)U.S. News & World Report, L.P. (Mortimer Zuckerman)
Editor Brian Kelly
Launched1948;71 years ago (1948) (merger of United States News [1933] and World Report [1946])
Language English
Headquarters
CountryUnited States
Website www.usnews.com

U.S. News & World Report is an American media company that publishes news, opinion, consumer advice, rankings, and analysis. Founded as a newsweekly magazine in 1933, U.S. News transitioned to primarily web-based publishing in 2010. U.S. News is best known today for its influential Best Colleges and Best Hospitals rankings, but it has expanded its content and product offerings in education, health, money, careers, travel, and cars. The rankings are popular in North America but have drawn widespread criticism from colleges, administrations, and students for their dubious, disparate, and arbitrary nature. The ranking system by U.S. News is usually contrasted with the Washington Monthly and Forbes rankings.

<i>Washington Monthly</i>

Washington Monthly is a bimonthly nonprofit magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, D.C. The magazine is known for its annual ranking of American colleges and universities, which serves as an alternative to the Forbes and U.S. News & World Report rankings.

<i>Forbes</i> American business magazine

Forbes is an American business magazine. Published bi-weekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, politics, and law. Its headquarters is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category include Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists and rankings, including of the richest Americans, of the world's top companies, and The World's Billionaires. The motto of Forbes magazine is "The Capitalist Tool". Its chair and editor-in-chief is Steve Forbes, and its CEO is Mike Federle. It was sold to a Hong Kong-based investment group, Integrated Whale Media Investments.

Contents

History

United States News was founded in 1933 by David Lawrence (1888–1973), who also started World Report in 1946. The two magazines covered national and international news separately, but Lawrence merged them into U.S. News & World Report in 1948. [1] He subsequently sold the magazine to his employees. Historically, the magazine tended to be slightly more conservative than its two primary competitors, Time and Newsweek , and focused more on economic, health, and education stories. It also eschewed sports, entertainment, and celebrity news. [2] Important milestones in the early history of the magazine include the introduction of the "Washington Whispers" column in 1934 and the "News You Can Use" column in 1952. [3] [4] In 1958, the weekly magazine's circulation passed one million and reached two million by 1973. [3]

Conservatism in the United States Political ideologies

American conservatism is a broad system of political beliefs in the United States that is characterized by respect for American traditions, republicanism, support for Judeo-Christian values, moral universalism, business, anti-communism, individualism, advocacy of American exceptionalism, and a defense of Western culture from the perceived threats posed by socialism, authoritarianism, and moral relativism. Liberty is a core value, as is with all major American parties. American conservatives consider individual liberty—within the bounds of American values—as the fundamental trait of democracy; this perspective contrasts with that of modern American liberals, who generally place a greater value on equality and social justice and emphasize the need for state intervention to achieve these goals. American conservatives believe in limiting government in size and scope, and in a balance between national government and states' rights. Apart from some libertarians, they tend to favor strong action in areas they believe to be within government's legitimate jurisdiction, particularly national defense and law enforcement. Social conservatives oppose abortion and favor restricting LGBT rights, while privileging traditional marriage and allowing voluntary school prayer.

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa, and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition.

Newsweek is an American weekly news magazine founded in 1933.

Since 1983, it has become known primarily for its influential ranking and annual reports of colleges and graduate schools, spanning across most fields and subjects. U.S. News & World Report is America's oldest and best-known ranker of academic institutions, [5] and covers the fields of business, law, medicine, engineering, education, social sciences and public affairs, in addition to many other areas. [6] Its print edition was consistently included in national bestseller lists, augmented by online subscriptions. Additional rankings published by U.S. News & World Report include hospitals, medical specialties and automobiles.

A bestseller is, usually, a book that is included on a list of top-selling or frequently-borrowed titles, normally based on publishing industry and book trade figures and library circulation statistics; such lists may be published by newspapers, magazines, or book store chains. Some lists are broken down into classifications and specialties. An author may also be referred to as a bestseller if their work often appears in this category. Well-known bestseller lists in the U.S. are published by Publishers Weekly, USA Today, The New York Times and The Washington Post. Most of these lists track book sales from national and independent bookstores, as well as sales from major internet retailers such as Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

In October 1984, publisher and real estate developer Mortimer Zuckerman purchased U.S. News & World Report. [4] Zuckerman is also formerly the owner of the New York Daily News . In 1993, U.S. News & World Report entered the digital world by providing content to CompuServe and in 1995, the website usnews.com was launched. In 2001, the website won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence Online. [7] In 2007, U.S. News & World Report published its first list of the nation's best high schools. Its ranking methodology includes state test scores and the success of poor and minority students on these exams, and schools' performance in Advanced Placement exams.

Real estate is "property consisting of land and the buildings on it, along with its natural resources such as crops, minerals or water; immovable property of this nature; an interest vested in this (also) an item of real property, buildings or housing in general. Also: the business of real estate; the profession of buying, selling, or renting land, buildings, or housing." It is a legal term used in jurisdictions whose legal system is derived from English common law, such as India, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, United States, Canada, Pakistan, Australia, and New Zealand.

Mortimer Zuckerman American businessman

Mortimer Benjamin Zuckerman is a Canadian-born American media proprietor, magazine editor, and investor. He is the co-founder, executive chairman and former CEO of Boston Properties, one of the largest real estate investment trusts in the United States. Zuckerman is also the owner and publisher of U.S. News & World Report, where he serves as editor-in-chief. He formerly owned the New York Daily NewsThe Atlantic and Fast Company. On the Forbes 2016 list of the world's billionaires, he was ranked No. 688 with a net worth of US$2.5 billion. As of February 9, 2018, his net worth is estimated at US$ 2.7 billion.

<i>New York Daily News</i> Daily tabloid newspaper based in New York City

The New York Daily News, officially titled Daily News, is an American newspaper based in New York City. As of May 2016, it was the ninth-most widely circulated daily newspaper in the United States. It was founded in 1919, and was the first U.S. daily printed in tabloid format. It reached its peak circulation in 1947, at 2.4 million copies a day.

Starting in June 2008, the magazine reduced its publication frequency in three steps. In June 2008, citing the decline overall magazine circulation and advertising, U.S. News & World Report announced that it would become a biweekly publication, starting January 2009. [8] It hoped advertisers would be attracted to the schedule, which allowed ads to stay on newsstands a week longer. However, five months later the magazine changed its frequency again, becoming monthly. [9] In August 2008, U.S. News expanded and revamped its online opinion section. [10] The new version of the opinion page included daily new op-ed content as well as the new Thomas Jefferson Street blog. [11] An internal memo was sent on November 5, 2010, to the staff of the magazine informing them that the "December issue will be our last print monthly sent to subscribers, whose remaining print and digital replica subscriptions will be filled by other publishers." [12] The memo went on to say that the publication would be moving to a primarily digital format but that it would continue to print special issues such as "the college and grad guides, as well as hospital and personal finance guides." Prior to going defunct, U.S. News was the lowest-ranking news magazine in the U.S., after Time and Newsweek. [13] A weekly digital magazine, U.S. News Weekly, introduced in January 2009, [14] continued to offer subscription content until it ceased at the end of April 2015. [15]

Biweekly means either occurring every two weeks, or occurring twice every week. This causes ambiguity when the term is used. As a result, in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, the term fortnightly is more commonly used for an event that occurs every two weeks.

The company is owned by U.S. News & World Report, L.P., a privately held company based in the Daily News building in New York City. The editorial staff is headquartered in Washington, D.C. [3] The company's move to the Web made it possible for U.S. News & World Report to expand its service journalism with the introduction of several consumer-facing rankings products. The company returned to profitability in 2013. [16] The editorial staff of U.S. News & World Report is based in Washington, D.C. and Brian Kelly has been the chief content officer since April 2007. The company is owned by media proprietor Mortimer Zuckerman.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Service journalism is a term for generally consumer-oriented features and advice, ranging from the serious to the frivolous.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first President of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Rankings

Who Runs America?

The first of the U.S. News & World Report's famous rankings was its "Who Runs America?" surveys. These ran in the spring of each year from 1974 to 1986. The magazine would have a cover typically featuring persons selected by the USN & WR as being the ten most powerful persons in the United States. Every single edition of the series listed the President of the United States as the most powerful person, but the #2 position included such persons as Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (1974), [17] Federal Reserve Chairmen Paul Volcker and Arthur Burns (each listed multiple years) and US Senator Edward Kennedy (1979). [18] While most of the top ten each year were officials in government, occasionally others were included, including TV anchormen Walter Cronkite and Dan Rather, Chase Manhattan Bank Chairman David Rockefeller, AFL-CIO leader George Meany, and consumer advocate Ralph Nader. The only woman to make the top ten list was First Lady Rosalynn Carter in 1980. [19]

In addition to these overall top ten persons, the publication also included top persons in each of several fields, including Education, Business, Finance, Journalism, and many other areas. The survey was discontinued after 1986.

Best colleges

2016 Best Colleges cover US News College.jpg
2016 Best Colleges cover

In 1983, U.S. News & World Report published its first "America's Best Colleges" report. [20] The rankings have been compiled and published annually since 1987. These rankings are based upon data that U.S. News & World Report collects from each educational institution from an annual survey sent to each school. The rankings are also based upon opinion surveys of university faculties and administrators who do not belong to the schools. In addition to colleges, U.S. News & World Report also ranks graduate schools and academic programs in a number of specific disciplines, including business, law, engineering, nursing, and medicine. [21]

The popularity of U.S. News & World Report's Best Colleges rankings is reflected in its 2014 release, which brought 2.6 million unique visitors and 18.9 million page views to usnews.com in one day. [22] Traffic came from over 3,000 sites, including Facebook and Google. [22] U.S. News & World Report continues to publish comprehensive college guides in book form. [23] Robert Morse created the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings methodology, and continues to oversee its application as chief data strategist at U.S. News. In 2014, The Washington Post featured a profile of Morse, exploring his 30-year career with the publication. [24]

Criticism

During the 1990s, several educational institutions in the United States were involved in a movement to boycott the U.S. News & World Report college rankings survey. The first was Reed College, which stopped submitting the survey in 1995. The survey was also criticized by Alma College, Stanford University, and St. John's College during the late 1990s. [25] SAT scores play a role in The U.S. News & World Report college rankings even though U.S. News is not empowered with the ability to formally verify or recalculate the scores that are represented to them by schools. Since the mid-1990s there have been many instances documented by the popular press wherein schools lied about their SAT scores in order to obtain a higher ranking. [26] An exposé in the San Francisco Chronicle stated that the elements in the methodology of U.S News & World Report's rankings are redundant and can be reduced to one thing: money. [27] On June 19, 2007, during the annual meeting of the Annapolis Group, members discussed the letter to college presidents asking them not to participate in the "reputation survey" section of the U.S. News & World Report survey (this section comprises 25% of the ranking).

As a result, "a majority of the approximately 80 presidents at the meeting said that they did not intend to participate in the U.S. News reputational rankings in the future." [28] The statement also said that its members "have agreed to participate in the development of an alternative common format that presents information about their colleges for students and their families to use in the college search process." [29] This database will be web-based and developed in conjunction with higher-education organizations including the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) and the Council of Independent Colleges.

On June 22, 2007, U.S. News & World Report editor Robert Morse issued a response in which he argued, "in terms of the peer assessment survey, we at U.S. News firmly believe the survey has significant value because it allows us to measure the 'intangibles' of a college that we can't measure through statistical data. Plus, the reputation of a school can help get that all-important first job and plays a key part in which grad school someone will be able to get into. The peer survey is by nature subjective, but the technique of asking industry leaders to rate their competitors is a commonly accepted practice. The results from the peer survey also can act to level the playing field between private and public colleges." [30] In reference to the alternative database discussed by the Annapolis Group, Morse also argued, "It's important to point out that the Annapolis Group's stated goal of presenting college data in a common format has been tried before [...] U.S. News has been supplying this exact college information for many years already. And it appears that NAICU will be doing it with significantly less comparability and functionality. U.S. News first collects all these data (using an agreed-upon set of definitions from the Common Data Set). Then we post the data on our website in easily accessible, comparable tables. In other words, the Annapolis Group and the others in the NAICU initiative actually are following the lead of U.S. News." [30]

Some higher education experts, such as Kevin Carey of Education Sector, have asserted that U.S. News & World Report's college rankings system is merely a list of criteria that mirrors the superficial characteristics of elite colleges and universities. According to Carey, the U.S. News ranking system is deeply flawed. Instead of focusing on the fundamental issues of how well colleges and universities educate their students and how well they prepare them to be successful after college, the magazine's rankings are almost entirely a function of three factors: fame, wealth, and exclusivity. He suggests that there are more important characteristics parents and students should research to select colleges, such as how well students are learning and how likely students are to earn a degree. [31]

The question of college rankings and their impact on admissions gained greater attention in March 2007, when Dr. Michele Tolela Myers (the former President of Sarah Lawrence College) shared in an op-ed [32] that the U.S. News & World Report, when not given SAT scores for a university, chooses to simply rank the college with an invented SAT score of approximately one standard deviation (roughly 200 SAT points) behind those of peer colleges, with the reasoning being that SAT-optional universities will, because of their test-optional nature, accept higher numbers of less academically capable students.

In a 2011 article regarding the Sarah Lawrence controversy, Peter Sacks of The Huffington Post criticized the U.S. News rankings' centering on test scores and denounced the magazine's "best colleges" list as a scam: [33]

In the U.S. News worldview of college quality, it matters not a bit what students actually learn on campus, or how a college actually contributes to the intellectual, ethical and personal growth of students while on campus, or how that institution contributes to the public good [...] and then, when you consider that student SAT scores are profoundly correlated [to] parental income and education levels – the social class that a child is born into and grows up with – you begin to understand what a corrupt emperor 'America's Best Colleges' really is. The ranking amounts to little more than a pseudo-scientific and yet popularly legitimate tool for perpetuating inequality between educational haves and have nots – the rich families from the poor ones, and the well-endowed schools from the poorly endowed ones.

Best global universities

In October 2014, the U.S. News & World Report published its inaugural "Best Global Universities" rankings. [34] Inside Higher Ed noted that the U.S. News is entering into the international college and university rankings area that is already "dominated by three major global university rankings," namely the Times Higher Education World University Rankings , the Academic Ranking of World Universities , and the QS World University Rankings . [35] Robert Morse stated that "it's natural for U.S. News to get into this space." [35] Morse also noted that the U.S. News "will also be the first American publisher to enter the global rankings space." [35]

Best hospitals

Since 1990, U.S. News & World Report has compiled the Best Hospitals rankings. [36] The Best Hospitals rankings are specifically based on a different methodology that looks at difficult (high acuity) cases within 16 specialties, including cancer; diabetes and endocrinology; ear, nose and throat; gastroenterology; geriatrics; gynecology; heart and heart surgery; kidney disorders; neurology and neurosurgery; ophthalmology; orthopedics; psychiatry; pulmonology; rehabilitation; rheumatology; and urology. [37] [38] In addition to rankings for each of these specialties, hospitals that excel in many U.S. News areas are ranked in the Honor Roll. [39]

Best cars

Since 2007, U.S. News has developed an innovative rankings system for new and used automobiles. The rankings span over 30 classes of cars, trucks, SUVs, minivans, wagons, and sports cars. Each automobile receives an overall score, as well as a performance, interior, and recommendation score to the nearest tenth on a 1-10 scale. Scores are based on the consensus opinion of America's trusted automotive experts, as well as reliability and safety data. [40] U.S. News also produces annual "Best Cars for the Money" and "Best Cars for Families" awards across approximately 20 classes of cars, trucks, SUVs, and minivans. Money award winners are derived by combining vehicle price and five-year cost of ownership with the opinion of the automotive press, [41] while family awards are tabulated by combining critics' opinions with the vehicle's availability of family-friendly features and interior space, as well as safety and reliability data. Money and family award winners are announced in February and March of each year, respectively. [42]

Best states

In 2017, U.S. News published its first ranking of all 50 U.S. states, incorporating metrics in seven categories: health care, education, crime and corrections, infrastructure, opportunity, economy, and government. The weighting of the individual categories in determining overall rank was informed by surveys on what matters most to residents. Massachusetts occupies the top rank of the 2017 list, with an overall #2 ranking in health care and #1 ranking in education. [43]

See also

Related Research Articles

Washington University in St. Louis university in St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Washington University in St. Louis is a private research university in St. Louis, Missouri. Founded in 1853, and named after George Washington, the university has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries. As of 2017, 24 Nobel laureates in economics, physiology and medicine, chemistry, and physics have been affiliated with Washington University, nine having done the major part of their pioneering research at the university.

Auburn University public university in Auburn, Alabama, United States

Auburn University is a public research and Land-grant university in Auburn, Alabama. With more than 23,000 undergraduate students and a total enrollment of more than 30,000 with 1,260 faculty members, Auburn is the second largest university in Alabama. It is one of the state's two public flagship universities.

Colorado School of Mines university

Colorado School of Mines, also referred to as "Mines", is a public teaching and research university in Golden, Colorado, devoted to engineering and applied science, with special expertise in the development and stewardship of the Earth's natural resources. Mines placed 82nd in the 2017 U.S. News & World Report "Best National Universities" ranking. In the 2016–17 QS World University Rankings by subject, the university was ranked as the top institution in the world for mineral and mining engineering.

Baylor College of Medicine private medical school in Houston, Texas, USA

Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), located in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas, US, is a health sciences university. It includes a medical school, Baylor College of Medicine; the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; the School of Allied Health Sciences; and the National School of Tropical Medicine. The school, located in the middle of the world's largest medical center, is part owner of Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center, part of the CHI St. Luke's Health system, and has hospital affiliations with: Harris Health System, Texas Children's Hospital, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Memorial Hermann – The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Menninger Clinic, the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Children's Hospital of San Antonio.

College and university rankings are rankings of institutions in higher education which have been ranked on the basis of various combinations of various factors. None of the rankings give a comprehensive overview of the strengths of the institutions ranked because all select a range of easily quantifiable characteristics to base their results on. Rankings have most often been conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments, or academics. In addition to ranking entire institutions, organizations perform rankings of specific programs, departments, and schools. Various rankings consider combinations of measures of funding and endowment, research excellence and/or influence, specialization expertise, admissions, student options, award numbers, internationalization, graduate employment, industrial linkage, historical reputation and other criteria. Various rankings mostly evaluating on institutional output by research. Some rankings evaluate institutions within a single country, while others assess institutions worldwide. The subject has produced much debate about rankings' usefulness and accuracy. The expanding diversity in rating methodologies and accompanying criticisms of each indicate the lack of consensus in the field. Further, it seems possible to game the ranking systems through excessive self-citations or by researchers supporting each other in surveys. UNESCO has questioned whether rankings "do more harm than good", while acknowledging that "Rightly or wrongly, they are perceived as a measure of quality and so create intense competition between universities all over the world".

University of Alabama at Birmingham public university in Birmingham, Alabama

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is a public research university in Birmingham, Alabama. Developed from an academic extension center established in 1936, the institution became a four-year campus in 1966 and a fully autonomous institution in 1969. Today, it is one of three institutions in the University of Alabama System and, along with the University of Alabama, an R1 research institution. In the fall of 2018, 21,923students from more than 110 countries were enrolled at UAB pursuing studies in 140 programs of study in 12 academic divisions leading to bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and professional degrees in the social and behavioral sciences, the liberal arts, business, education, engineering, and health-related fields such as medicine, dentistry, optometry, nursing, and public health.

California State University, Fresno university

California State University, Fresno is a public university in Fresno, California. It is one of 23 campuses within the California State University system. The university had a Fall 2016 enrollment of 24,405 students. It offers bachelor's degrees in 60 areas of study, 45 master's degrees, 3 doctoral degrees, 12 certificates of advanced study, and 2 different teaching credentials.

Mercy College (New York) college in Dobbs Ferry, USA

Mercy College is a private research university with its main campus located on 66 acres in Dobbs Ferry, New York, with additional locations in Manhattan, Bronx and Yorktown Heights. Mercy College continues to be guided by the legacy of its founders, the Sisters of Mercy. Mercy College has five schools: Business, Education, Health & Natural Sciences, Liberal Arts and Social & Behavioral Sciences, and offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs. The university had 11,295 students enrolled in Fall 2015. The student body comes from 43 states and 54 countries.

Law school rankings are a specific subset of college and university rankings dealing specifically with law schools. Like college and university rankings, law school rankings can be based on empirical data, subjectively-perceived qualitative data, or some combination of these. Such rankings are often consulted by prospective students as they choose which schools they will apply to or which school they will attend.

The New York University Leonard N. Stern School of Business is the business school of New York University. It is also a founding member of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Established as the School of Commerce, Accounts and Finance in 1900, the school changed its name in 1988 in honor of Leonard N. Stern, an alumnus and benefactor of the school. One of the most prestigious business schools in the world, it is also one of the oldest. The school is located on NYU's Greenwich Village campus next to the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. Its alumni include some of the wealthiest in the world, as well as top business leaders and executives.

The Annapolis Group is an American organization of independent liberal arts colleges. It represents approximately 130 liberal arts colleges in the United States. These colleges work together to promote a greater understanding of the goals of a liberal arts education through their websites, as well as through independent research. Its current chair is Stephen D. Schutt, the president of Lake Forest College.

Criticism of college and university rankings (North America)

Criticism of college and university rankings refers to movements which developed among faculty and administrators in American Institutions of Higher Education as well as in Canada. The arguments of those who criticize the ranking are that it is not possible to come with a single number that characterizes university performance. Furthermore, ratings can be easily manipulated and include such subjective characteristics as the “reputation” determined by surveying university administrators such as chancellors or deans. In addition, the methodology of many rankings emphasizes research expenditures as the only measure of scientific accomplishments despite the concern that measuring science by the amount of money spent rather than by the importance and impact of scientific discoveries or the depth of the ideas could encourage costly projects that are not necessary scientifically sound.

Criticism of college and university rankings (2007 United States)

Criticism of college and university rankings has been voiced by a 2007 movement which developed among faculty and administrators in American Institutions of Higher Education. It follows previous movements in the U.S. and Canada which have criticized the practice of college rankings. The arguments of those who criticize the ranking are that it is not possible to come with a single number that characterizes university performance. Ratings, as argued by academic institutions and their leaders, can be easily manipulated and include such subjective characteristics as the “reputation” determined by surveying university administrators such as chancellors or deans. Methodology of many rankings emphasizes research expenditures as the only measure of scientific accomplishments despite the concern that measuring science by the amount of money spent rather than by the importance and impact of scientific discoveries or the depth of the ideas could encourage costly projects that are not necessary scientifically sound.

Liberal arts colleges in the United States are certain undergraduate institutions of higher education in the United States. The Encyclopædia Britannica Concise offers a definition of the liberal arts as a "college or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general intellectual capacities, in contrast to a professional, vocational, or technical curriculum." Generally, a full-time, four-year course of study at a liberal arts college leads students to earning Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and on rare occasion Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.) degrees.

College and university rankings in the United States are rankings of US colleges and universities ordered by contributing factors which vary depending on the organization performing the ranking. Rankings have most often been conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, or academics. In addition to ranking entire institutions, specific programs, departments, and schools can be ranked. Some rankings consider measures of wealth, research excellence and/or influence, selectivity, student options, eventual success, demographics, and other criteria. There is much debate about rankings' interpretation, accuracy, usefulness, and appropriateness. The expanding diversity in rating methodologies and accompanying criticisms of each indicate the lack of consensus in the field.

Virginia Tech College of Engineering

The Virginia Tech College of Engineering is the academic unit that manages engineering research and education at Virginia Tech. The College can trace its origins to 1872, and was formally established in 1903. Today, The College of Engineering has 14 departments of study. Its undergraduate program was ranked 14th and its graduate program was ranked 30th among doctoral-granting universities by U.S. News & World Report in 2018. In 2014-15, the College of Engineering consisted of 10,059 students. The current dean is Dr. Julia Ross.

Several nationally, and internationally based publications release annual rankings of universities in Canada. Rankings have most often been conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments, or academia. Ranking are established to help inform potential applicants about Canadian universities based on a range of criteria, including student body characteristics, classes, faculty, finances, library, and reputation. Various rankings consider combinations of factors, including funding and endowment, research excellence and/or influence, specialization expertise, admissions, student options, award numbers, internationalization, graduate employment, industrial linkage, historical reputation and other criteria. Various rankings also evaluate universities based on research output. Canadian-based publications have generally limited their evaluations on universities in Canada, whereas internationally based rankings ranked Canadian institutions alongside other higher education institutions around the world.

In 2014, U.S. News & World Report published its Best Global University Ranking. Its ranking methodology is based on 10 different indicators that measure universities' academic performance and reputations. U.S. News & World Report's inaugural Best Global Universities ranking was launched on 28 October 2014, and it was based on data and metrics provided by Thomson Reuters, and are thus methodologically different from the criteria traditionally used by U.S. News to rank American institutions. Universities are judged on factors such as global research reputation, publications and number of highly cited papers. U.S. News also publishes region-specific and subject-specific global rankings based on this methodology.

In 1983, U.S. News & World Report published its first "America's Best Colleges" report. The rankings have been compiled and published annually since 1985 and are the most widely quoted of their kind in the United States. These rankings are based upon data that U.S. News & World Report collects from each educational institution from an annual survey sent to each school. The rankings are also based upon opinion surveys of university faculties and administrators who do not belong to the schools.

References

  1. David E. Sumner (May 2012). "American winners and losers:2001 to 2010" (PDF). International Conference on Communication, Media, Technology and Design. Istanbul. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  2. "U.S. News & World Report". Encyclopædia Britannica . 2008. Retrieved June 24, 2008.
  3. 1 2 3 "About U.S. News & World Report" . Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  4. 1 2 "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-16. Retrieved 2014-10-15.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. "U.S. News college rankings are denounced but not ignored". The Washington Post . The Washington Post Company. 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2011.
  6. "U.S. News & World Report: Comprehensive Categories of Academic Institutions". U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News & World Report, L.P. 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2012.
  7. "2001 National Magazine Awards". Infoplease.
  8. Pérez-Peña, Richard (June 11, 2008). "U.S. News Plans to Publish Biweekly and Expand Consumer Focus". The New York Times . The New York Times Company . Retrieved June 24, 2008.
  9. "Red Ink: 'U.S. News' Goes Monthly, Hearst and Rodale Cut Staff". MediaPost. June 11, 2008. Archived from the original on March 7, 2012. Retrieved June 11, 2008.
  10. "Political Blogs, Opinions, Commentaries and Forums on Current Issues". U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News & World Report, L.P. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  11. "Political Blogs, Opinions, Commentaries and Forums on Current Issues". US News. Retrieved June 30, 2013.
  12. "'December issue will be our last printed monthly sent to subscribers'". PoytnerOnline. November 5, 2010. Archived from the original on November 6, 2010. Retrieved November 5, 2010.
  13. Sacks, Peter (April 5, 2007). "America's Best College Scam". The Huffington Post . AOL. Archived from the original on April 2, 2011.
  14. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-09-10. Retrieved 2016-04-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  15. U.S. News Digital Weekly. 4/24/2015, Vol. 7 Issue 17, p.15
  16. "Value Added: U.S. News & World Report returns to the ranks of profitability".
  17. "backissues.com - U.S. News & World Report April 22, 1974 - Product Details".
  18. "backissues.com - U.S. News & World Report April 16, 1979 - Product Details".
  19. "backissues.com - U.S. News & World Report April 14, 1980 - Product Details".
  20. Morse, Robert. "The Birth of the College Rankings". US News. Retrieved 14 April 2017.
  21. "Graduate School Rankings". Archived from the original on 2017-02-23.
  22. 1 2 "U.S. News Pulls Social Levers to Break Records for 'Best Colleges' Package - min Online". 19 September 2013. Archived from the original on 23 January 2015.
  23. "Amazon's listings of U.S. News "College Guides"". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2015-01-17.
  24. Leiby, Richard; Leiby, Richard (9 September 2014). "The U.S. News college rankings guru" via washingtonpost.com.
  25. Christopher B. Nelson, "Why you won't find St. John's College ranked in U.S.News & World Report Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine ", University Business: The Magazine for College and University Administrators.
  26. Diver, Colin. "Is There Life After Rankings". The Atlantic . November 1, 2005.
  27. Rojstaczer, Stuart (September 3, 2001). "College Rankings are Mostly About Money". San Francisco Chronicle.
  28. Jaschik, Scott (20 June 2007). "More Momentum Against 'U.S.News'". Inside Higher Ed.
  29. "Annapolis Group Statement on Rankings and Ratings". Annapolis Group. 19 June 2007.
  30. 1 2 Morse, Robert (22 June 2007). "About the Annapolis Group's Statement". U.S. News & World Report. Archived from the original on 2 July 2007.
  31. Carey, Kevin. "College Rankings Reformed" (PDF). educationsector.org. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 23, 2009. Retrieved July 28, 2009.
  32. Tolela Myers, Michele (11 March 2007). "The Cost of Bucking College Rankings". The Washington Post.
  33. Sacks, Peter (May 25, 2011). "America's Best College Scam". The Huffington Post. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  34. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-30. Retrieved 2014-10-30.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  35. 1 2 3 "'U.S. News' to Issue New Global University Rankings". Inside Higher Ed.
  36. "Top American Hospitals - US News Best Hospitals". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2014-10-15.
  37. Lowes, Robert (2012-09-20). "Joint Commission's Top-Hospital List Still Missing Big Names". Medscape Medical News.
  38. Comarow, Avery (2008-07-10). "A Look Inside the Hospital Rankings". U.S. News & World Report.
  39. "Top American Hospitals". U.S. News & World Report. 17 July 2012.
  40. How We Rank New Cars | U.S. News Best Cars. cars.usnews.com. Retrieved on 2014-04-12.
  41. Page, Jamie. (2014-02-12) Best Cars for the Money Awards 2014 | U.S. News Best Cars Archived March 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine . cars.usnews.com. Retrieved on 2014-04-12.
  42. Page, Jamie. (2014-03-12) Best Cars for Families Awards 2014 | U.S. News Best Cars. cars.usnews.com. Retrieved on 2014-04-12.
  43. Best States Rankings. U.S. News. Retrieved on 2017-04-06.