1980 World Championships in Athletics

Last updated
1980 World Championships in Athletics
Host city Sittard, Netherlands
Nations participating21
Athletes participating42
Events2
Dates14–16 August 1980
Officially opened by Queen Beatrix
Main venue De Baandert

The 1980 World Championships in Athletics was the second global, international athletics competition organised by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). Hosted from 14 to 16 August 1980 at the De Baandert in Sittard, Netherlands, it featured two events: the women's 400 metres hurdles and the women's 3000 metres run. [1] West Germany's Birgit Friedmann took the first women's world title in the 3000 m, while her East German counterpart Bärbel Broschat became the first women's 400 m hurdles world champion. [2]

Contents

Summary

Historically, the IAAF and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) agreed that the Athletics at the Summer Olympics served as the world championship event for the sport. The IAAF began to expand its programme of approved events for women and this conflicted with the Olympic athletics programme. The 400 m hurdles was recently introduced event for female athletes while the 3000 m marked the increasing popularity of long-distance running events among women. Neither event was contested at the 1980 Moscow Olympics. The boycott of those Olympics and the presence of the Liberty Bell Classic (an alternative event for the boycotting nations) gave the IAAF additional incentive to hold its own competition; although the Soviet Union withdrew, the events in Sittard attracted entries from countries on both sides of the Western and Eastern divide. [3]

A total of 42 women from 21 nations entered the competition – there were 18 participants in the 3000 m and 24 athletes in the 400 m hurdles. The hurdles format had four heats of six athletes, two semi-finals of eight athletes, then an "A" and a "B" final. The 3000 m run had two stages: two heats of nine athletes each, followed by a final of twelve athletes. [4]

The tournament followed the 1976 World Championships in Athletics, which featured just one event – the men's 50 kilometres walk – and was organised by the IAAF in reaction to the IOC dropping that event for the 1976 Summer Olympics. [2] The 1980 World Championships preceded the launch of the IAAF's independent global event, with the inaugural 1983 World Championships in Athletics taking place three years later with a programme of 41 events. [5]

One athlete, Spain's Rosa Colorado, later had her results at the championships disqualified for doping offences. [6]

Medallists

EventGoldSilverBronze
3000 metresFlag of Germany.svg  Birgit Friedmann  (FRG)Flag of Sweden.svg  Karoline Nemetz  (SWE)Flag of Norway.svg  Ingrid Kristiansen  (NOR)
400 metres hurdlesFlag of East Germany.svg  Bärbel Broschat  (GDR)Flag of East Germany.svg  Ellen Neumann  (GDR)Flag of East Germany.svg  Petra Pfaff  (GDR)

Schedule

DateEvent
14 August400 m hurdles heats
3000 m heats
15 August400 m hurdles semi-finals
16 August400 m hurdles finals
3000 m final

400 metres hurdles results

Heats

Hurdles winner Barbel Broschat was the fastest athlete in all three rounds. Bundesarchiv Bild 183-H0811-0035, Barbel Klepp, Petra Pfaff.jpg
Hurdles winner Bärbel Broschat was the fastest athlete in all three rounds.

Qualifying rule: the first three athletes in each heat (Q) plus the four fastest non-qualifiers (q) progressed to the semi-finals.

RankHeatNameNationalityTimeNotes
13 Bärbel Broschat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 56.13Q
24 Ellen Neumann Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 56.35Q
31 Esther Mahr Flag of the United States.svg  United States 57.51Q
41 Hilde Frederiksen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 57.72Q
52 Petra Pfaff Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 57.92Q
64 Christine Warden Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 57.84Q
72 Lynette Foreman Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 58.07Q
83 Mary Appleby Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 58.54Q
81 Montserrat Pujol Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 58.54Q
103 Rosa Colorado Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 58.79Q
111 Olga Commandeur Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 58.87q
124 Helle Sichlau Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 58.99Q
132 Susan Dalgoutté Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 59.63Q
142 Esther Kaufmann Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 59.74q
152 Simone Büngener Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 59.98q
163 Francine Gendron Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1:00.40q
173 Debra Melrose Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1:00.46
181 Lai Lih-Jian Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg  Chinese Taipei 1:01.01
193 Ruth Dubois Flag of France.svg  France 1:01.12
202 Dominique Le Disset Flag of France.svg  France 1:01.22
214 Kim Whitehead Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1:01.33
224 Andrea Wachter Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1:02.28
234 Célestine N'Drin Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 1:04.91
1 Kirsi Ulvinen Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden DSQ

Semi-finals

Qualifying rule: the first four athletes in each semi-final (Q) progressed to the "A" final. The remaining non-qualifiers were entered into the "B" final.

RankHeatNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 Bärbel Broschat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 55.89Q
12 Ellen Neumann Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 55.89Q
32 Esther Mahr Flag of the United States.svg  United States 56.16Q
41 Petra Pfaff Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 56.78Q
51 Mary Appleby Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 57.06Q
62 Christine Warden Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 57.26Q
71 Hilde Frederiksen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 57.44Q
82 Lynette Foreman Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 57.46Q
92 Rosa Colorado Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 57.47
101 Montserrat Pujol Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 57.72
112 Olga Commandeur Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 57.93
121 Helle Sichlau Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 58.44
132 Simone Büngener Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 59.11
142 Esther Kaufmann Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 59.55
151 Susan Dalgoutté Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 59.85
161 Francine Gendron Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1:00.14

"A" final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Bärbel Broschat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 54.55 CR, PB
Silver medal icon.svg Ellen Neumann Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 54.56
Bronze medal icon.svg Petra Pfaff Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 55.84
4 Mary Appleby Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 56.51
5 Esther Mahr Flag of the United States.svg  United States 56.81
6 Hilde Frederiksen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 56.85
7 Lynette Foreman Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 58.24
N/A Christine Warden Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain DSQ

"B" final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 Rosa Colorado Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 57.51
2 Helle Sichlau Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 58.03
3 Montserrat Pujol Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 58.38
4 Simone Büngener Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 58.77
5 Susan Dalgoutté Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 59.31
6 Esther Kaufmann Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 59.41
7 Francine Gendron Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 59.61
N/A Olga Commandeur Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands DNS

3000 metres results

Heats

Qualifying rule: the first five athletes in each heat (Q) plus the two fastest non-qualifiers (q) progressed to the final.

RankHeatNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 Aurora Cunha Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 9:04.7Q
12 Birgit Friedmann Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 9:04.7Q
32 Breda Pergar Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 9:04.9Q
42 Karoline Nemetz Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 9:04.9Q
52 Joelle Debrouwer Flag of France.svg  France 9:05.0Q
62 Penny Werthner Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9:05.8Q
71 Charlotte Teske Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 9:06.1Q
81 Ingrid Kristiansen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 9:06.4Q
91 Eva Ernström Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 9:06.5Q
102 Wendy Smith Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 9:07.3q
111 Geri Fitch Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9:07.6Q
121 Mary Shea Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9:09.4q
132 Julie Shea Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9:11.4
142 Fionnuala Morrish Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 9:13.8
151 Anat Meiri Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 9:26.7
161 Anne Audain Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 9:26.8
171 Brenda Webb Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9:27.6
182 Olga Caccaviello Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10:01.2

Final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Birgit Friedmann Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 8:48.05 CR, PB
Silver medal icon.svg Karoline Nemetz Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8:50.22
Bronze medal icon.svg Ingrid Kristiansen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8:58.8
4 Joelle Debrouwer Flag of France.svg  France 8:59.0
5 Breda Pergar Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 8:59.7
6 Penny Werthner Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9:03.5
7 Charlotte Teske Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 9:04.3
8 Eva Ernström Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 9:07.7
9 Aurora Cunha Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 9:11.2
10 Mary Shea Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9:13.7
11 Geri Fitch Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9:37.6
N/A Wendy Smith Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain DNF

Participation

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)1113
2Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)1001
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0101
4Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)0011
Totals (4 nations)2226

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References

  1. Archive of Past Events. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  2. 1 2 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  3. Matthews, Peter (2012). Historical Dictionary of Track and Field (pg. 217). Scarecrow Press (eBook). Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  4. "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009" (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. 194, 210–1. Archived from the original (pdf) on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 5 August 2009.
  5. 1st IAAF World Championships in Athletics. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  6. IAAF Statistics Book Moscow 2013 (archived). IAAF (2013). Retrieved on 2015-07-06.
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