1987 World Championships in Athletics

Last updated
2nd World Championships in Athletics
Rome IAAF 1987.jpg
Host city Rome, Italy
Nations participating159
Athletes participating1451
Events43
DatesAugust 28 – September 6, 1987
Officially opened by President Francesco Cossiga
Main venue Stadio Olimpico

The 2nd World Championships in Athletics under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations were held in the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, Italy between August 28 and September 6, 1987.

Contents

Men's results

Track

1983 | 1987 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995

GamesGoldSilverBronze
100 m
details
Carl Lewis
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
9.931
EWR
Ray Stewart
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
10.08 Linford Christie
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
10.14
200 m
details
Calvin Smith
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
20.16 Gilles Quénéhervé
Flag of France.svg  France
20.16 John Regis
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
20.18
400 m
details
Thomas Schönlebe
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
44.33
AR
Innocent Egbunike
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
44.56 Butch Reynolds
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
44.80
800 m
details
Billy Konchellah
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
1:43.06
CR
Peter Elliott
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
1:43.41 José Luiz Barbosa
Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil
1:43.76
1,500 m
details
Abdi Bile
Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia
3:36.80 José Luis González
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
3:38.03 Jim Spivey
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
3:38.82
5,000 m
details
Saïd Aouita
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco
13:26.44 Domingos Castro
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
13:27.59 Jack Buckner
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
13:27.74
10,000 m
details
Paul Kipkoech
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
27:38.63
CR
Francesco Panetta
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
27:48.98 Hansjörg Kunze
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
27:50.37
Marathon
details
Douglas Wakiihuri
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
2:11:48 Hussein Ahmed Salah
Flag of Djibouti.svg  Djibouti
2:12:30 Gelindo Bordin
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
2:12:40
110 m hurdles
details
Greg Foster
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
13.21 Jon Ridgeon
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
13.29 Colin Jackson
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
13.38
400 m hurdles
details
Edwin Moses
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
47.46
CR
Danny Harris
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
47.48 Harald Schmid
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
47.48
AR
3,000 m st.
details
Francesco Panetta
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
8:08.57
CR
Hagen Melzer
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
8:10.32 William Van Dijck
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
8:12.18
20 km walk
details
Maurizio Damilano
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1:20:45
CR
Jozef Pribilinec
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
1:21:07 José Marín
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
1:21:24
50 km walk
details
Hartwig Gauder
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
3:40:53
CR
Ronald Weigel
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
3:41:30 Vyacheslav Ivanenko
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
3:44:02
4 × 100 m relay
details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Lee McRae
Lee McNeill
Harvey Glance
Carl Lewis
Dennis Mitchell*
37.90Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)
Aleksandr Yevgenyev
Viktor Bryzgin
Vladimir Muravyov
Vladimir Krylov
Andrey Fedoriv*
38.02
AR
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica  (JAM)
John Mair
Andrew Smith
Clive Wright
Ray Stewart
38.41
4 × 400 m relay
details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Danny Everett
Roddie Haley
Antonio McKay
Butch Reynolds
Michael Franks*
Raymond Pierre*
2:57.29
CR
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Derek Redmond
Kriss Akabusi
Roger Black
Phil Brown
Todd Bennett*
Mark Thomas*
2:58.86
AR
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba  (CUB)
Leandro Peñalver
Agustin Pavó
Lázaro Martínez
Roberto Hernández
2:59.16
NR
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

1 Ben Johnson of Canada originally won the gold medal in 9.83, but he was disqualified in September 1989 after he admitted to using steroids between 1981 and 1988.
* Indicates athletes who ran in preliminary rounds.

Field

1983 | 1987 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995

GamesGoldSilverBronze
Long jump
details
Carl Lewis
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
8.67
CR
Robert Emmiyan
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
8.53 Larry Myricks
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
8.331
Triple jump
details
Khristo Markov
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Bulgaria
17.92
CR and AR
Mike Conley
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
17.67 Oleg Sakirkin
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
17.43
High jump
details
Patrik Sjöberg
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2.38
CR
Hennadiy Avdyeyenko
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Igor Paklin
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
2.38
CR
Not awarded
Pole vault
details
Sergey Bubka
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
5.85
CR
Thierry Vigneron
Flag of France.svg  France
5.80 Rodion Gataullin
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
5.80
Shot put
details
Werner Günthör
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
22.23
CR
Alessandro Andrei
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
21.88 John Brenner
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
21.75
Discus throw
details
Jürgen Schult
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
68.74
CR
John Powell
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
66.22 Luis Delís
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
66.02
Hammer throw
details
Sergey Litvinov
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
83.06
CR
Jüri Tamm
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
80.84 Ralf Haber
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
80.76
Javelin throw
details
Seppo Räty
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland
83.54
CR
Viktor Yevsyukov
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
82.52 Jan Železný
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
82.20
Decathlon
details
Torsten Voss
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
8680 Siegfried Wentz
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
8461 Pavel Tarnavetskiy
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
8375
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

1 Giovanni Evangelisti of Italy originally won the bronze in the long jump with a jump of 8.37 m, but it was later determined that Italian field officials had entered a pre-arranged fake result for a jump of 7.85 m. . Evangelisti did not know about the scam, but Italian head coach Sandro Donati revealed the fraud and was fired. [1]

Women's results

Track

1983 | 1987 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995

GamesGoldSilverBronze
100 m
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Silke Gladisch  (GDR)10.90
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Heike Drechsler  (GDR)11.00Flag of Jamaica.svg  Merlene Ottey  (JAM)11.04
200 m
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Silke Gladisch  (GDR)21.74
CR
Flag of the United States.svg  Florence Griffith  (USA)21.96Flag of Jamaica.svg  Merlene Ottey  (JAM)22.06
400 m
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Olga Bryzgina  (URS)49.38Flag of East Germany.svg  Petra Muller  (GDR)49.94Flag of East Germany.svg  Kirsten Emmelmann  (GDR)50.20
800 m
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Sigrun Wodars  (GDR)1:55.26
NR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Christine Wachtel  (GDR)1:55.32Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Lyubov Gurina  (URS)1:55.56
1,500 m
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Tetyana Samolenko  (URS)3:58.56
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Hildegard Körner  (GDR)3:58.67Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Doina Melinte  (ROU)3:59.27
3,000 m
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Tetyana Samolenko  (URS)8:38.73Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Maricica Puică  (ROU)8:39.45Flag of East Germany.svg  Ulrike Bruns  (GDR)8:40.30
10,000 m
details
Flag of Norway.svg  Ingrid Kristiansen  (NOR)31:05.85Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yelena Zhupiyeva  (URS)31:09.40Flag of East Germany.svg  Kathrin Ullrich  (GDR)31:11.34
Marathon
details
Flag of Portugal.svg  Rosa Mota  (POR)2:25:17
CR
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Zoya Ivanova  (URS)2:32:38Flag of France.svg  Jocelyne Villeton  (FRA)2:32:53
100 m hurdles
details
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Ginka Zagorcheva  (BUL)12.34
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Gloria Uibel  (GDR)12.44Flag of East Germany.svg  Cornelia Oschkenat  (GDR)12.46
400 m hurdles
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Sabine Busch  (GDR)53.62
CR
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Debbie Flintoff  (AUS)54.19Flag of East Germany.svg  Cornelia Ullrich  (GDR)54.31
10 km walk
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Irina Strakhova  (URS)44:12
CR
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Kerry Saxby  (AUS)44:23Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  Yan Hong  (CHN)44:42
4 × 100 m relay
details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Alice Brown
Diane Williams
Florence Griffith
Pam Marshall
41.58
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)
Silke Gladisch
Cornelia Oschkenat
Kerstin Behrendt
Marlies Göhr
41.95Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)
Irina Slyusar
Natalya Pomoschchnikova
Natalya German
Olga Antonova
42.33
4 × 400 m relay
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)
Dagmar Neubauer
Kirsten Emmelmann
Petra Muller
Sabine Busch
Cornelia Ullrich*
3:18.63
CR
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)
Aelita Yurchenko
Olga Nazarova
Mariya Pinigina
Olga Bryzgina
3:19.50Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Diane Dixon
Denean Howard
Valerie Brisco
Lillie Leatherwood
3:21.04
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Note: * Indicates athletes who ran in preliminary rounds.

Field

1983 | 1987 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995

GamesGoldSilverBronze
Long jump
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Jackie Joyner-Kersee  (USA)7.36
CR
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yelena Belevskaya  (URS)7.14Flag of East Germany.svg  Heike Drechsler  (GDR)7.13
High jump
details
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Stefka Kostadinova  (BUL)2.09
WR
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Tamara Bykova  (URS)2.04Flag of East Germany.svg  Susanne Beyer  (GDR)1.99
Shot put
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Natalya Lisovskaya  (URS)21.24
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Kathrin Neimke  (GDR)21.21Flag of East Germany.svg  Ines Müller  (GDR)20.76
Discus throw
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Martina Hellmann  (GDR)71.62
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Diana Gansky  (GDR)70.12Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Tsvetanka Khristova  (BUL)68.82
Javelin throw
details
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Fatima Whitbread  (GBR)76.64
CR
Flag of East Germany.svg  Petra Felke  (GDR)71.76Flag of Germany.svg  Beate Peters  (FRG)68.82
Heptathlon
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Jackie Joyner-Kersee  (USA)7128
CR
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Larisa Nikitina  (URS)6564Flag of the United States.svg  Jane Frederick  (USA)6502
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Exhibition events

Two exhibition para-athletics events appeared at the competition, but results did not go towards the overall medal count. The two wheelchair races were the first time disability events had appeared at the championships, and were the first exhibition event of any kind to feature at the World Championships in Athletics. This began a tradition of such events which continued until 2011. Wheelchair exhibition events were contested until that year, bar 1999 and 2009. [2]

GamesGoldSilverBronze
Men's 1500 m wheelchairFlag of France.svg  Mustapha Badid  (FRA)3:54.32Flag of Sweden.svg  Lars Lofström  (SWE)3:54.90Flag of Switzerland.svg  Franz Nietlispach  (SUI)3:55.27
Women's 800 m wheelchairFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Diane Rakiecki  (CAN)2:32.52Flag of Denmark.svg  Connie Hansen  (DEN)2:37.07Flag of Denmark.svg  Ingrid Lauridsen  (DEN)2:39.95

Medal table

  *   Host nation (Italy)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)10111031
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)104620
3Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)712625
4Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)3014
5Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya  (KEN)3003
6Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)*2215
7Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)1348
8Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal  (POR)1102
9Flag of Finland.svg  Finland  (FIN)1001
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco  (MAR)1001
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)1001
Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia  (SOM)1001
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)1001
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland  (SUI)1001
15Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)0213
16Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia  (AUS)0202
17Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica  (JAM)0134
18Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)0123
19Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)0112
Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Romania  (ROU)0112
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)0112
22Flag of Djibouti.svg  Djibouti  (DJI)0101
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)0101
24Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba  (CUB)0022
25Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium  (BEL)0011
Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil  (BRA)0011
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)0011
Totals (27 nations)434442129
Source:

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References

  1. The Man Who Knows Too Much Archived 2014-02-26 at the Wayback Machine , Sport Monthly, March 2003, retr from chrisharrisonwriting.com on 2012 10 20
  2. Butler, Mark et al. (2013). IAAF Statistics Book Moscow 2013 (archived), pp. 306–8. IAAF. Retrieved on 2015-07-06.