1987 IAAF World Indoor Championships

Last updated
1st IAAF World Indoor Championships
Indianapolis 1987 logo.jpg
DatesMarch 6–8
Host city Indianapolis, United States
Venue Hoosier Dome
Events24
Participation401 athletes from
85 nations

The 1st IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics were held in Indianapolis, United States from March 6 to March 8, 1987. The championship had previously been known as the World Indoor Games, which were held once before changing the name.

Contents

Being the second championship of its kind, there were several championship records. New championship records were set for every single women's event. There were a total number of 419 participating athletes from 85 countries.

Results

Men

EventGoldSilverBronze
60 metres
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Lee McRae  (USA)6.501
(CR)
Flag of the United States.svg  Mark Witherspoon  (USA)6.54Flag of Italy.svg  Pierfrancesco Pavoni  (ITA)6.59
200 metres
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Kirk Baptiste  (USA)20.73
(CR)
Flag of France.svg  Bruno Marie-Rose  (FRA)20.89Flag of Brazil.svg  Robson da Silva  (BRA)20.92
400 metres
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Antonio McKay  (USA)45.98Flag of Cuba.svg  Roberto Hernández  (CUB)46.09Flag of the United States.svg  Michael Franks  (USA)46.19
800 metres
details
Flag of Brazil.svg  José Luiz Barbosa  (BRA)1:47.49Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Graudyn  (URS)1:47.68Flag of Morocco.svg  Faouzi Lahbi  (MAR)1:47.79
1500 metres
details
Flag of Ireland.svg  Marcus O'Sullivan  (IRL)3:39.04
(CR)
Flag of Spain.svg  José Manuel Abascal  (ESP)3:39.13Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Han Kulker  (NED)3:39.51
3000 metres
details
Flag of Ireland.svg  Frank O'Mara  (IRL)8.03.32Flag of Ireland.svg  Paul Donovan  (IRL)8.03.39Flag of the United States.svg  Terry Brahm  (USA)8:03.92
60 metres hurdles
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Tonie Campbell  (USA)7.51
(CR)
Flag of France.svg  Stéphane Caristan  (FRA)7.62Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Nigel Walker  (GBR)7.66
5000 metres walk
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mikhail Shchennikov  (URS)18:27.79
(CR)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jozef Pribilinec  (TCH)18:27.80Flag of Mexico.svg  Ernesto Canto  (MEX)18:38.71
High jump
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Igor Paklin  (URS)2.38
(CR)
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Hennadiy Avdyeyenko  (URS)2.38Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Ján Zvara  (TCH)2.34
Pole vault
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Sergey Bubka  (URS)5.85
(CR)
Flag of the United States.svg  Earl Bell  (USA)5.80Flag of France.svg  Thierry Vigneron  (FRA)5.80
Long jump
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Larry Myricks  (USA)8.23
(CR)
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Paul Emordi  (NGR)8.01Flag of Italy.svg  Giovanni Evangelisti  (ITA)8.01
Triple jump
details
Flag of the United States.svg  Mike Conley  (USA)17.54
(CR)
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Oleg Protsenko  (URS)17.26Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Frank Rutherford  (BAH)17.02
Shot put
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Ulf Timmermann  (GDR)22.24
(CR)
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Werner Günthör  (SUI)21.61Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Sergey Smirnov  (URS)20.67

1 Ben Johnson of Canada originally won the 60 metres in 6.41, but was disqualified in September 1989 after admitting to using steroids between 1981 and 1988. [1]

Women

EventGoldSilverBronze
60 metres
details
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Nelli Fiere-Cooman  (NED)7.08
(CR)
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Aneliya Nuneva  (BUL)7.101Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Angela Bailey  (CAN)7.12
200 metres
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Heike Drechsler  (GDR)22.27
(CR)
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Merlene Ottey-Page  (JAM)22.66Flag of Jamaica.svg  Grace Jackson  (JAM)23.21
400 metres
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Sabine Busch  (GDR)51.66
(CR)
Flag of the United States.svg  Lillie Leatherwood  (USA)52.54Flag of Hungary.svg  Judit Forgács  (HUN)52.68
800 metres
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Christine Wachtel  (GDR)2:01.32
(CR)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Gabriela Sedláková  (TCH)2:01.85Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Lyubov Kiryukhina  (URS)2:01.98
1500 metres
details
Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Doina Melinte  (ROU)4:05.68
(CR)
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Tatyana Samolenko  (URS)4:07.08Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Svetlana Kitova  (URS)4:07.59
3000 metres
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Tatyana Samolenko  (URS)8:46.52
(CR)
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Olga Bondarenko  (URS)8:47.08Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Maricica Puică  (ROU)8:47.92
60 metres hurdles
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Cornelia Oschkenat  (GDR)7.82
(CR)
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Yordanka Donkova  (BUL)7.85Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Ginka Zagorcheva  (BUL)7.99
3000 metres walk
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Olga Krishtop  (URS)12:05.49
(CR)
Flag of Italy.svg  Giuliana Salce  (ITA)12:36.76Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Ann Peel  (CAN)12:38.97
High jump
details
Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Stefka Kostadinova  (BUL)2.05
(CR)
Flag of East Germany.svg  Susanne Beyer  (GDR)2.02Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Emiliya Dragieva  (BUL)2.00
Long jump
details
Flag of East Germany.svg  Heike Drechsler  (GDR)7.10
(CR)
Flag of East Germany.svg  Helga Radtke  (GDR)6.94Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yelena Belevskaya  (URS)6.76
Shot put
details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Natalya Lisovskaya  (URS)20.52
(CR)
Flag of East Germany.svg  Ilona Briesenick  (GDR)20.28Flag of Germany.svg  Claudia Losch  (FRG)20.14

1 Angella Issajenko of Canada originally finished second in the 60 metres in 7.08, but was disqualified in September 1989 after admitting to steroid use between 1985 and 1988. [1]

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)65415
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)63211
3Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)6309
4Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland  (IRL)2103
5Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)1225
6Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)1012
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)1012
Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg  Romania  (ROU)1012
9Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)0213
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)0213
11Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)0123
12Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica  (JAM)0112
13Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba  (CUB)0101
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)0101
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)0101
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland  (SUI)0101
17Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)0022
18Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas  (BAH)0011
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)0011
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary  (HUN)0011
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico  (MEX)0011
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco  (MAR)0011
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)0011
Totals (23 nations)24242472

Participating nations

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Mark Butler (ed.), "DOPING VIOLATIONS AT IAAF WORLD INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS", IAAF Statistics Book – World Indoor Championships SOPOT 2014 (PDF), IAAF, pp. 47–48, retrieved 27 September 2015[ permanent dead link ]