1993 IAAF World Indoor Championships

Last updated
4th IAAF World Indoor Championships
Toronto 1993 logo.jpg
DatesMarch 12–14
Host city Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Venue Skydome
Events27 (+4 non-championship)
Participation537 [1] athletes from
93 nations

The 4th IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics were held at the Skydome in Toronto, Ontario, Canada from March 12 to March 14, 1993. It was the last Indoor Championships to feature the 5,000 and 3,000 metres race walk events. In addition, it was the first Indoor Championships to include heptathlon and pentathlon, albeit as non-championship events. There were a total number of 537 athletes participated from 93 countries.

Contents

Results

Men

1989 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995 | 1997

EventGoldSilverBronze
60 metres
details
Bruny Surin
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
6.50
(CR)
Frankie Fredericks
Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia
6.51
(NR)
Talal Mansour
Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar
6.57
200 metres
details
James Trapp
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
20.63 Damien Marsh
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
20.71 Kevin Little
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
20.72
400 metres
details
Butch Reynolds
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
45.26
(CR)
Sunday Bada
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
45.75 Darren Clark
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
46.45
800 metres
details
Tom McKean
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
1:47.29 Charles Nkazamyampi
Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
1:47.62 Nico Motchebon
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1:48.15
1500 metres
details
Marcus O'Sullivan
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland
3:45.00 David Strang
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
3:45.30 Branko Zorko
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
3:45.39
3000 metres
details
Gennaro Di Napoli
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
7:50.26 Eric Dubus
Flag of France.svg  France
7:50.57 Enrique Molina
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
7:51.10
60 metres hurdles
details
Mark McKoy
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
7.41
(CR)
Colin Jackson
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
7.43 Tony Dees
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
7.43
High jump
details
Javier Sotomayor
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
2.41 Patrik Sjöberg
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2.39 Steve Smith
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
2.37
Pole vault
details
Rodion Gataullin
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
5.90 Grigoriy Yegorov
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
5.80 Jean Galfione
Flag of France.svg  France
5.80
Long jump
details
Iván Pedroso
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
8.23 Joe Greene
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
8.13 Jaime Jefferson
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
7.98
Triple jump
details
Pierre Camara
Flag of France.svg  France
17.59
(CR)
Māris Bružiks
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia
17.36 Brian Wellman
Flag of Bermuda.svg  Bermuda
17.27
Shot put
details
Mike Stulce
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
21.27 Jim Doehring
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
21.08 Aleksandr Bagach
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
20.63
4 × 400 metres relay
details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)
Darnell Hall
Brian Irvin
Jason Rouser
Mark Everett
3:04.20Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago  (TRI)
Daziel Jules
Alvin Daniel
Neil de Silva
Ian Morris
3:07.02
(NR)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)
Masayoshi Kan
Seiji Inagaki
Yoshihiko Saito
Hiroyuki Hayashi
3:07.30
5000 metres walk
details
Mikhail Shchennikov
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
18:32.10 Robert Korzeniowski
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
18:35.91 Mikhail Orlov
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
18:43.48

Women

1989 | 1991 | 1993 | 1995 | 1997

EventGoldSilverBronze
60 metres
details
Gail Devers
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
6.95
(CR)
Irina Privalova
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
6.97 Zhanna Tarnopolskaya
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
7.21
200 metres
details
Irina Privalova
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
22.15
(CR)
Melinda Gainsford
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
22.73 Natalya Voronova
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
22.90
400 metres
details
Sandie Richards
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
50.93
(NR)
Tatyana Alekseyeva
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
51.03 Jearl Miles
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
51.37
800 metres
details
Maria Mutola
Flag of Mozambique.svg  Mozambique
1:57.55
(CR)
Svetlana Masterkova
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
1:59.18 Joetta Clark
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:59.86
1500 metres
details
Yekaterina Podkopayeva
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
4:09.29 Violeta Beclea
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
4:09.41 Sandra Gasser
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
4:10.99
3000 metres
details
Yvonne Murray
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
8:50.55 Margareta Keszeg
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
9:02.89 Lynn Jennings
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
9:03.78
60 metres hurdles
details
Julie Baumann
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland
7.86 LaVonna Martin
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
7.99 Patricia Girard
Flag of France.svg  France
8.01
High jump
details
Stefka Kostadinova
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria
2.02 Heike Henkel
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2.02 Inga Babakova
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
2.00
Long jump
details
Marieta Ilcu
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
6.84 Susen Tiedtke
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
6.84 Inessa Kravets
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
6.77
Triple jump
details
Inessa Kravets
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
14.47
(CR)
Yolanda Chen
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
14.36 Inna Lasovskaya
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
14.35
Shot put
details
Svetlana Krivelyova
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
19.57 Stephanie Storp
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
19.37 Zhang Liuhong
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
19.32
4 × 400 metres relay
details
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Deon Hemmings,
Beverly Grant,
Cathy Rattray-Williams,
Sandie Richards
3:32.32Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Trevaia Williams,
Terri Dendy,
Dyan Webber,
Natasha Kaiser-Brown
3:32.50nonenone
3000 metres walk
details
Yelena Nikolayeva
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
11:49.73
(CR)
Kerry Saxby-Junna
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
11:53.82 Ileana Salvador
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
11:55.35

Non-championship events

Some events were contested without counting towards the total medal status. The 1600 metres medley relay consisted of four legs over 800 m, 200 m, 200 m and 400 m.

GamesGoldSilverBronze
Men's heptathlon
details
Dan O'Brien
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
6476 Mike Smith
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
6279 Eduard Hämäläinen
Flag of Belarus (1918, 1991-1995).svg  Belarus
6075
Women's pentathlon
details
Liliana Nastase
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
4686 Urszula Włodarczyk
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
4667 Birgit Clarius
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
4641
Irina Belova (RUS) won the women's pentathlon and was awarded the gold medal, but was later disqualified when she was found to have been doping. [3] [5]
Men's 1600 metres
Medley Relay
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Mark Everett,
James Trapp,
Kevin Little,
Butch Reynolds
3:15.10Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Gilmar dos Santos,
André da Silva,
Sidnei de Souza,
Eronilde de Araujo
3:16.11Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Freddie Williams,
Ricardo Greenidge,
Peter Ogilvie,
Mark Jackson
3:16.93
Women's 1600 metres
Medley Relay
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Joetta Clark,
Wendy Vereen,
Kim Batten,
Jearl Miles
3:45.90Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Donalda Duprey,
Sonia Paquette,
Mame Twumasi,
Alanna Yakiwchuk
3:56.34nonenone
The Russian women's 1600 metres medley relay team, composed of Yelena Afanasyeva, Marina Shmonina, Yelena Rusina and Yelena Andreyeva, originally won the event, but were later disqualified when Shmonina was found to have been doping. [3]

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia 64313
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)54514
3Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)2215
4Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba  (CUB)2013
5Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)2002
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica  (JAM)2002
7Flag of Romania.svg  Romania  (ROM)1203
8Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)1124
9Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine  (UKR)1045
10Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1012
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland  (SUI)1012
12Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)1001
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland  (IRL)1001
Flag of Mozambique.svg  Mozambique  (MOZ)1001
15Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia  (AUS)0314
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0314
17Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi  (BDI)0101
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan  (KAZ)0101
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia  (LAT)0101
Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia  (NAM)0101
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)0101
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland  (POL)0101
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0101
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago  (TRI)0101
25Flag of Bermuda.svg  Bermuda  (BER)0011
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)0011
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia  (CRO)0011
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)0011
Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar  (QAT)0011
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)0011
Totals (30 nations)27272680

Participating nations

See also

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References

  1. (558 when counting non-championship events)
  2. "Sporting Digest: Drugs in sport". The Independent. 13 April 1993. Retrieved 6 January 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Istanbul 2012 – Notes on contents, IAAF, p. 45, retrieved 31 May 2015
  4. Sport References: Marina Shmonina
  5. Sports Reference – Irina Belova