1999 Malawian general election

Last updated
1999 Malawian general election
Flag of Malawi.svg
  1994 15 June 1999 2004  
Presidential election
  Bakili Muluzi 2002 (profile).jpg Gwanda Chakuamba (cropped).jpg
Nominee Bakili Muluzi Gwanda Chakuamba
Party UDF MCPAD
Popular vote2,442,6852,106,790
Percentage52.38%45.17%

President before election

Bakili Muluzi
UDF

Elected President

Bakili Muluzi
UDF

General elections were held in Malawi on 15 June 1999 to elect the President and National Assembly. They were originally scheduled for 25 May, [1] but were postponed twice as a result of requests by the opposition to extend the voter registration period. [2] Both votes were won by the ruling United Democratic Front, who took 93 of the 192 seats in the National Assembly, and whose candidate, Bakili Muluzi, won the presidential election with an absolute majority.

Contents

In total, eleven parties contested the elections, with 670 candidates. [2] Voter turnout was 94%. [3]

Results

President

CandidatePartyVotes%
Bakili Muluzi United Democratic Front 2,442,68552.38
Gwanda Chakuamba Malawi Congress PartyAlliance for Democracy 2,106,79045.17
Kamlepo Kalua Malawi Democratic Party 67,8561.45
Daniel Kanfosi Nkhumbwe Congress for National Unity 24,3470.52
Bingu wa Mutharika United Party22,0730.47
Total4,663,751100.00
Valid votes4,663,75198.07
Invalid/blank votes91,6711.93
Total votes4,755,422100.00
Registered voters/turnout5,071,82293.76
Source: African Elections Database

National Assembly

Elections were not held in the Mchinji West constituency on polling day due to the death of a candidate. [4]

PartyVotes%Seats+/–
United Democratic Front 2,124,99947.3293+8
Malawi Congress Party 1,518,54833.8166+10
Alliance for Democracy 474,21510.5629–7
United Party26,0730.580New
Malawi Democratic Party 11,3840.2500
Social Democratic Party7,2970.160New
Malawi Democratic Union3,2690.0700
Congress for National Unity 3,0230.070New
Sapitwa National Democratic Party1,3720.030New
National Patriotic Front1,1490.030New
Mass Movement for the Young Generation7080.020New
Independents318,9697.104+4
Vacant1
Total4,491,006100.00193+16
Valid votes4,491,00695.88
Invalid/blank votes192,9444.12
Total votes4,683,950100.00
Registered voters/turnout5,071,82292.35
Source: MEC

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