Acanthaeschna victoria

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Thylacine darner
Acanthaeschna victoria.jpg
Male
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Infraorder: Anisoptera
Family: Telephlebiidae
Genus: Acanthaeschna
Selys, 1883 [2]
Species:
A. victoria
Binomial name
Acanthaeschna victoria
Martin, 1901 [3]
Acanthaeschna victoria distribution map.svg

Acanthaeschna victoria, the thylacine darner, [4] is a species of Australian dragonfly in the family Telephlebiidae. [5] It is the only member of the genus Acanthaeschna. [6] [7] Acanthaeschna victoria is rare and endemic to coastal areas of both southern and northern New South Wales as well as southern Queensland. Its natural habitat is intertidal marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Acanthaeschna victoria is a large, brown dragonfly with a distinctive dark band on the side of its body that runs from the head to the abdomen. [8] It has clear wings [4] with a small dark stain at the nodus, the joint near the middle of the leading edge of each wing.

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References

  1. Dow, R.A. (2017). "Acanthaeschna victoria". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2017: e.T43A14255260. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-1.RLTS.T43A14255260.en .
  2. Selys-Longchamps, E (1883). "Synopsis des Aeschnines. Première partie: Classification". Bulletin de la Classe des Science, Académie Royale de Belgique. 3 (in French). 5: 712–748 [732] via Biodiversity Heritage Library.
  3. Martin, Rene (1901). "Les odonates du continent australien". Mémoires de la Société Zoologique de France (in French). 14: 220–248 [233] via Biodiversity Heritage Library.
  4. 1 2 Theischinger, Günther; Hawking, John (2006). The Complete Field Guide to Dragonflies of Australia. Collingwood, Victoria, Australia: CSIRO Publishing. p. 134. ISBN   978 0 64309 073 6.
  5. "Species Acanthaeschna victoria Martin, 1901". Australian Faunal Directory . Australian Biological Resources Study. 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  6. Martin Schorr; Martin Lindeboom; Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Archived from the original on 28 August 2010. Retrieved 11 August 2010.
  7. "Genus Acanthaeschna Selys, 1883". Australian Faunal Directory . Australian Biological Resources Study. 2012. Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  8. Theischinger, Gunther; Endersby, Ian (2009). Identification Guide to the Australian Odonata (PDF). Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water NSW. p. 245. ISBN   978 1 74232 475 3.