Athletics at the 1928 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the IX Olympiad
Georg Lammers, Percy Williams, Jack London 1928.jpg
Georg Lammers, Percy Williams and Jack London
Venue Olympic Stadium
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Dates29 July 1928 (heats, quarterfinals)
30 July 1928 (semifinals, final)
Competitors76 from 32 nations
Winning time10.8 seconds
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada
Silver medal icon.svg Jack London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Bronze medal icon.svg Georg Lammers Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany
  1924
1932  

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands, were held at the Olympic Stadium on Sunday, 29 July and Monday, 30 July. Eighty-one runners entered, though ultimately seventy-six runners from 32 nations competed. [1] NOCs were limited to 4 competitors each. [2] The event was won by Percy Williams of Canada, taking the nation's first men's 100 metres gold medal. Jack London of Great Britain took silver, marking the third consecutive Games that Great Britain had a medalist in the event. Georg Lammers won bronze, Germany's first medal in the event since 1896. For the first time in modern Olympic history, the United States won no medals in the event.

Contents

Background

This was the eighth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. None of the 1924 finalists competed (bronze medalist Arthur Porritt entered, but did not start). Notable entrants included Frank Wykoff, winner of the U.S. Olympic trials and by default one of the favorites in a field that was "considered to be wide-open"; Great Britain's Jack London, and Germany's Georg Lammers. [3]

Cuba, Lithuania, and Romania were represented in the event for the first time. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first eight Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the four round format from 1920 and 1924: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. There were 16 heats, of 3–6 athletes each, with the top 2 in each heat advancing to the quarterfinals. The 32 quarterfinalists were placed into 6 heats of 5 or 6 athletes. Again, the top 2 advanced. There were 2 heats of 6 semifinalists, this time with the top 3 advancing to the 6-man final. [3]

Records

These are the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1928 Summer Olympics.

World Record10.4 Flag of the United States.svg Charlie Paddock Redlands, California (USA)April 23, 1921
Olympic Record10.6 Flag of the United States.svg Donald Lippincott Stockholm (SWE)July 6, 1912
10.6 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Harold Abrahams Paris (FRA)July 6/7 1924

Percy Williams equalized the standing Olympic record with 10.6 seconds in the fourth heat of the second round. In the first semifinal, Williams, Robert McAllister, and Wilfred Legg all equalized the record.

Results

First Round

Sixteen heats were held, the two fastest of each qualified for the second round.

Heat 1

Heat 1: Willy Dujardin, Wilhelm Hennings, Angelos Lamprou, John Fitzpatrick, Richard Corts 1928 Olympic 100 m heat 1.jpg
Heat 1: Willy Dujardin, Wilhelm Hennings, Angelos Lamprou, John Fitzpatrick, Richard Corts
RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 John Fitzpatrick Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.0Q
2 Richard Corts Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.0Q
3 Willy Dujardin Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 11.2
4 Wilhelm Hennings Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.4
5 Angelos Lambrou Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece 11.4

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Sydney Atkinson Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 11.2Q
2 André Mourlon Flag of France.svg  France 11.3Q
3 Jesús Moraila Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico Unknown
4 Franco Reyser Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Unknown
Friedrich-Wilhelm Wichmann Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany DNS

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frank Wykoff US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0Q
2 Paul Brochart Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium UnknownQ
3 Jaap Boot Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Unknown(*)
4 Mario Gómez Daza Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico Unknown
5 Konstantinos Petridis Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece Unknown
6 Fernando Muñagorri Flag of Spain (1785-1873 and 1875-1931).svg  Spain Unknown

(*) Some sources credit the third place to Gómez Daza and list Boot in fourth. (The official report did not show the ranking.)

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ferenc Gerő Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 10.8Q
2 Aubrey Burton-Durham Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa UnknownQ
3 Willy Weibel Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.4
4 Diego Ordóñez Flag of Spain (1785-1873 and 1875-1931).svg  Spain 11.4
5 John Heap Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain Unknown
6 Eduardo Albe Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Unknown

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Jack London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.8Q
2 George Hester Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada UnknownQ
3 Ladislau Peter Flag of Romania.svg  Romania Unknown
4 Francisco Costas Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico Unknown
5 Mehmet Ali Aybar Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg  Turkey Unknown

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Juan Bautista Pina Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.0Q
2 Ralph Adams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada UnknownQ
3 Edgardo Toetti Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Unknown
4 Iwao Aizawa Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan Unknown
5 Semih Türkdoğan Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg  Turkey Unknown

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wilfred Legg Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 11.0Q
2 Cyril Gill Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.0Q
3 Rodolfo Wagner Flag of Chile.svg  Chile Unknown
Sándor Hajdú Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary DNS
Giuseppe Castelli Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy DNS

Heat 8

Heat 8: Hubert Houben, Karel Knenicky, Johannes Viljoen Hubert Houben and Johannes Viljoen 1928.jpg
Heat 8: Hubert Houben, Karel Kněnický, Johannes Viljoen
RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Hubert Houben Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.0Q
2 Johannes Viljoen Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 11.0Q
3 Karel Kněnický Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.3
4 Dolf Benz Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.4

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Georg Lammers Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.8Q
2 André Théard Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti UnknownQ
3 János Paizs Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary Unknown
4 Leo Jørgensen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Unknown
5 Jean Moulin Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg Unknown
6 Renos Frangoudis Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece Unknown

Heat 10

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Walter Rangeley Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.0Q
2 Rinus van den Berge Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.1Q
3 Johann Bartl Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia Unknown
4 Şinasi Şahingiray Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg  Turkey Unknown

Heat 11

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 István Raggambi Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 11.0Q
2 Jimmy Carlton Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.1Q
3 Alberto Barucco Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Unknown
4 Óscar Alvarado Flag of Chile.svg  Chile Unknown
5 Juan Serrahima Flag of Spain (1785-1873 and 1875-1931).svg  Spain Unknown
6 R. Burns British Raj Red Ensign.svg  India Unknown

Heat 12

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.0Q
2 Jaroslav Vykoupil Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia UnknownQ
3 André Dufau Flag of France.svg  France Unknown
4 José de Lima Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Unknown
5 Haris Šveminas Flag of Lithuania (1918-1940).svg  Lithuania Unknown

Heat 13

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 José Barrientos Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.0Q
2 André Cerbonney Flag of France.svg  France UnknownQ
3 Fred Zinner Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Unknown
- Arthur Porritt Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand DNS

Heat 14

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Claude Bracey US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0Q
2 Gilbert Auvergne Flag of France.svg  France 11.1Q
3 Hermann Geißler Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 11.2
4 Risto Mattila Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 11.3
5 Emmanuel Goldsmith Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.5
6 George Schmit Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 12.2

Heat 15

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Henry Russell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0Q
2 Denis Cussen Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland UnknownQ
3 Willy Tschopp Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland Unknown
4 Adolphe Groscol Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Unknown

Heat 16

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Bob McAllister US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8Q
2 Anselmo Gonzaga Flag of the Philippines (1919-1936).svg  Philippines UnknownQ
3 Enrique de Chávarri Flag of Spain (1785-1873 and 1875-1931).svg  Spain Unknown
4 Frédéric Eyschen Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg Unknown
5 H. Enis Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg  Turkey DNS

Quarterfinals

Six heats were held, the two fastest of each qualified for the semifinals.

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wilfred Legg Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 10.8Q
2 John Fitzpatrick Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada UnknownQ
3 Ferenc Gerő Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary Unknown
4 Rinus van den Berge Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Unknown
5 Denis Cussen Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland Unknown
6 Jaroslav Vykoupil Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia Unknown

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Robert McAllister US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8Q
2 Richard Corts Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.0Q
3 Cyril Gill Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain Unknown
4 István Raggambi Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary Unknown
5 Aubrey Burton-Durham Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa Unknown
6 André Cerbonney Flag of France.svg  France Unknown

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Henry Russell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8Q
2 Hubert Houben Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany UnknownQ
3 Gilbert Auvergne Flag of France.svg  France Unknown
4 George Hester Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada Unknown
5 Sydney Atkinson Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa Unknown

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.6Q, =OR
2 Jack London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.8Q
3 André Théard Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti Unknown
4 André Mourlon Flag of France.svg  France Unknown
5 José Barrientos Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba Unknown

Quarterfinal 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frank Wykoff US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8Q
2 Juan Bautista Pina Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina UnknownQ
3 Johannes Viljoen Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa Unknown
4 Anselmo Gonzaga Flag of the Philippines (1919-1936).svg  Philippines Unknown
5 Jimmy Carlton Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11.0

Quarterfinal 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Claude Bracey US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8Q
2 Georg Lammers Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany UnknownQ
3 Walter Rangeley Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain Unknown
4 Ralph Adams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada Unknown
5 Paul Brochart Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Unknown

Semifinals

Two semifinals were held, the three fastest of each qualified for the final.

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Robert McAllister US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.6Q, =OR
2 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.6Q, =OR
3 Wilfred Legg Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 10.6Q. =OR
4 Hubert Houben Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.7
5 Claude Bracey US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8
6 Juan Bautista Pina Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.0

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Jack London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.6Q, =OR
2 Georg Lammers Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.7Q
3 Frank Wykoff US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.7Q
4 Henry Russell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8
5 Richard Corts Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.8
6 John Fitzpatrick Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.9

Final

There were two false starts, by Legg and Wykoff. Once the final successfully started, Williams took the early lead and never relinquished it. [3]

RankAthleteNationTime
Gold medal icon.svg Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.8
Silver medal icon.svg Jack London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.9
Bronze medal icon.svg Georg Lammers Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.9
4 Frank Wykoff US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0
5 Wilfred Legg Red Ensign of South Africa (1912-1928).svg  South Africa 11.0
6 Robert McAllister US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1928 Amsterdam Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  2. Official Report, p. 374.
  3. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.