Athletics at the 1948 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XIV Olympiad
Venue Wembley Stadium
London, England
Dates30 July 1948 (heats, quarterfinals)
31 July 1948 (semifinals, final)
Competitors63 from 33 nations
Winning time10.3 seconds
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Harrison Dillard US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Barney Ewell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Lloyd LaBeach Flag of Panama.svg  Panama
  1936
1952  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1948 Olympic Games in London, England, we held at Wembley Stadium on 30 and 31 July. [1] Sixty-three athletes from 33 nations competed; each nation was limited to 3 runners by rules set at the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Harrison Dillard, in a photo finish. Lloyd LaBeach of Panama won his nation's first medal in the men's 100 metres, a bronze. This was the first time a photo finish camera was used at an Olympic Games. [2] The photo finish equipment consisted of a photoelectric cell, called the Magic Eye, produced by Swiss watchmaker Omega and a slit photography camera produced by the British Race Finish Recording Company. [3]

Contents

Background

This was the eleventh time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. With a 12 year gap due to World War II, none of the athletes from the 1936 edition returned. Notable entrants and favorites were American Mel Patton and Panamanian Lloyd LaBeach. American Barney Ewell was a "top sprinter" but "felt to be slightly past his prime." The third member of the United States team was Harrison Dillard, a hurdles specialist who had also entered the 100 metres and came in third at the U.S. Olympic trials. [4]

Bermuda, Burma, Guyana, Iraq, Jamaica, Pakistan, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, and Uruguay were represented in the event for the first time. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first eleven Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the four round format from 1920–1936: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. There were 12 heats, of 4–7 athletes each, with the top 2 in each heat advancing to the quarterfinals. The 24 quarterfinalists were placed into 4 heats of 6 athletes. The top 3 in each quarterfinal advanced to the semifinals. There were 2 heats of 6 semifinalists, once again with the top 3 advancing to the 6-man final. [4]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record 10.2Flag of the United States.svg  Jesse Owens  (USA) Chicago, United States 20 June 1936
10.2Flag of the United States.svg  Harold Davis  (USA) Compton, United States6 June 1941
Olympic record10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Eddie Tolan Los Angeles, USA August 1, 1932
10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Ralph Metcalfe Los Angeles, USA August 1, 1932
10.3 Jesse Owens Berlin, Germany August 2, 1936

Harrison Dillard of the United States matched the Olympic record in the final.

Schedule

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1).

DateTime
Friday, 30 July 194815:00
17:30
Round 1
Round 2
Saturday, 31 July 194814:30
15:45
Semifinals
Finals

Results

Round 1

The fastest two runners in each of the twelve heats advanced to the second round. Official hand-timed results are known (and provided in the Official Report) only for the top three in each heat; unofficial auto-timed results are shown in parentheses. [4]

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Barney Ewell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.5Q
2 Alastair McCorquodale Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.5Q
3 Leslie Laing Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 11.0
4 Angel García Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba (11.25)
5 Nestor Jacono Flag of Malta (1943-1964).svg  Malta (11.54)
Bogdan LipskiFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland DNS

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Mel Patton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.6Q
2 Ivan Hausen Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 10.9Q
3 James O'Brien Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.9
4 Fernando Lapuente Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina (11.16)
5 Hector Gosset Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium (11.50)
6 Guillermo Rodríguez Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico (11.97)

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Lloyd La Beach Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.5Q
2 Béla Goldoványi Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary 11.0Q
3 Frank Mahoney Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 11.8
George RhodenFlag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica DNS
Tomás PaqueteFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal DNS
John De SaramBritish Ceylon flag.svg  Sri Lanka DNS

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Juan López Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 10.5Q
2 Ken Jones Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.6Q
3 Jan Meijer Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.0
4 Máximo Reyes Flag of Peru (1825-1950).svg  Peru (11.04)
5 Finnbjörn Þorvaldsson Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland (11.23)
Kyros MarinisFlag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece DNS

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harrison Dillard US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.4Q
2 Aroldo da Silva Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 10.6Q
3 Peter Bloch Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 11.1
4 Pol Braekman Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium (11.30)
Ricardo SáenzFlag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain DNS
John O'DonnellFlag of Ireland.svg  Ireland DNS

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.5Q
2 Haukur Clausen Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 11.0Q
3 Abram van Heerden Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 11.1
4 Carlos Silva Flag of Chile.svg  Chile (11.08)
5 Bernabe Lovina Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg  Philippines (11.32)
6 Stanley Lines Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda (11.69)

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.5Q
2 René Valmy Flag of France.svg  France 10.8Q
3 György Csányi Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary 11.1
4 Carlos Isaac Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina (11.24)
5 Sayed Moukhtar Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg  Egypt (11.71)
6 Ali Salman Flag of Iraq (1921-1959).svg  Iraq (11.90)
Jack ParryCanadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada DNS

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.7Q
2 John Bartram Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.8Q
3 Basil McKenzie Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 10.8
4 Hélio da Silva Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil (11.09)
5 Jo Zwaan Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (11.09)
Duncan WhiteBritish Ceylon flag.svg  Sri Lanka DNS

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Morris Curotta Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.7Q
2 Gerardo Bönnhoff Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10.8Q
3 Raúl Mazorra Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.1
4 Örn Clausen Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland (11.22)
5 Raşit Öztaş Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey (11.35)
- Perry Johnson Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda DSQ

Heat 10

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 George Lewis Flag of Trinidad and Tobago 1889-1958.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.8Q
2 Ted Haggis Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.9Q
3 Walter Pérez Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 11.0
4 Santiago Ferrando Flag of Peru (1825-1950).svg  Peru (11.19)
5 Stefanos Petrakis Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece (11.62)
Joseph StéphanFlag of France.svg  France DNS

Heat 11

The tailwind of 3.3 m/s made this heat ineligible for records purposes.

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Isidoor Van De Wiele Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.8Q
2 Nuno Morais Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 10.9Q
3 Alberto Labarthe Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 11.0
4 Muhammad Sharif Butt Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan (11.23)
5 Charles Thompson Flag of British Guiana (1919-1955).svg  Guyana Unknown
Joe KellyFlag of Ireland.svg  Ireland DNS
Dennis ShoreFlag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa DNS

Heat 12

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Mario Fayos Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 11.0Q
2 Eric Prabhakar Flag of India.svg  India 11.0Q
3 László Bartha Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary 11.1
4 Jan Kleyn Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (11.36)
5 Kemal Aksur Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey (11.45)
6 Maung Sein Pe Flag of Burma (1948-1974).svg  Burma (11.78)
- Étienne Bally Flag of France.svg  France DNF

Quarterfinals

The fastest three runners in each of the four heats advanced to the semifinal round. Official hand-timed results are known (and provided in the Official Report) only for the top three in each heat; unofficial auto-timed results are shown in parentheses. [4]

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harrison Dillard US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.4Q
2 Juan López Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 10.6Q
3 Ken Jones Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.7Q
4 Ivan Hausen Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil (10.93)
5 Ted Haggis Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada (10.97)
6 António Morais Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal (11.32)

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Barney Ewell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.5Q
2 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.6Q
3 Morris Curotta Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.8Q
4 George Lewis Flag of Trinidad and Tobago 1889-1958.svg  Trinidad and Tobago (11.04)
5 Béla Goldoványi Flag of Hungary (1946-1949, 1956-1957).svg  Hungary (11.11)
6 Haukur Clausen Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland (11.18)

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Mel Patton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.4Q
2 Alastair McCorquodale Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.5Q
3 John Bartram Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.6Q
4 René Valmy Flag of France.svg  France (10.82)
5 Mario Fayos Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay (11.08)
6 Isidoor Van De Wiele Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium (11.10)

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Lloyd La Beach Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.5Q
2 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.5Q
3 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.6Q
4 Aroldo da Silva Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil (11.04)
5 Gerardo Bönnhoff Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina (11.09)
6 Eric Prabhakar Flag of India.svg  India (11.26)

Semifinals

The fastest three runners in each of the two heats advanced to the final round. Official hand-timed results are known (and provided in the Official Report) only for the top three in each heat; unofficial auto-timed results are shown in parentheses. [4]

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harrison Dillard US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.5Q
2 Barney Ewell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.5Q
3 Alastair McCorquodale Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.7Q
4 John Bartram Flag of Australia.svg  Australia (10.98)
5 Juan López Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay (11.05)
6 Morris Curotta Flag of Australia.svg  Australia (11.15)

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Mel Patton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.4Q
2 Lloyd LaBeach Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.5Q
3 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.6Q
4 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia (10.74)
5 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba (10.82)
6 Ken Jones Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain (11.01)

Final

Patton "got off to a disastrous start and was not a factor." Dillard led the entire way. Official hand-timed results are known (and provided in the Official Report) only for the top three in each heat; unofficial auto-timed results are shown in parentheses. [4]

RankAthleteNationTime (hand)Notes
Gold medal icon.svg Harrison Dillard US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.3 =OR
Silver medal icon.svg Barney Ewell US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.4
Bronze medal icon.svg Lloyd LaBeach Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.6
4 Alastair McCorquodale Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain (10.61)
5 Mel Patton US flag 48 stars.svg  United States (10.67)
6 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain (10.81)

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1948 London Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  2. Jackson, Peter (24 July 2012). "London's three Olympic Games compared", BBC News.
  3. https://secondtime.com/blog/omega-the-olympics-and-the-innovations-required-to-time-the-earths-best/
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.