Athletics at the 1976 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXI Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
DatesJuly 23, 1976 (heats, quarterfinals)
July 24, 1976 (semifinals, final)
Competitors63 from 40 nations
Winning time10.06 seconds
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Hasely Crawford
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Silver medal icon.svg Don Quarrie
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Bronze medal icon.svg Valeriy Borzov
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
  1972
1980  

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was held at Olympic Stadium on July 23 and 24. [1] Sixty-three athletes from 40 nations competed. [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Hasely Crawford of Trinidad and Tobago, earning the nation's first gold medal and making Crawford a national hero. Don Quarrie's silver medal made Jamaica only the third country to reach the men's 100 metres podium three consecutive times (after the United States, which had streaks of 9 Games and 7 Games, and Great Britain, which had medaled consecutively in 1920, 1924, and 1928). Valeriy Borzov of the Soviet Union was unable to defend his title, but by taking bronze became the third man to medal twice in the event. For only the second time (after 1928), the United States did not have a medalist in the event.

Contents

In the preliminary rounds, all the top athletes were running times in the 10.30s to 10.40s, while by the semi-finals some times dropped to the 10.20s. They took the top 4 from each semi, so Steve Riddick was left out of the final even though he had run faster than Guy Abrahams in the earlier semi. With the #1 time from the semis, Hasely Crawford was still placed in lane 1, somewhat hidden from the other top contenders in the center of the track, including Harvey Glance, 200 metre specialist Don Quarrie and the defending champion Valeriy Borzov. From the gun, Borzov was out fast in lane 3 gaining a half a metre on Quarrie next to him in 4, with Glance another half metre behind Quarrie. As Quarrie slowly gained on Borzov, Crawford was also speeding down lane 1. Quarrie went past Borzov, but Crawford was already ahead for a narrow victory, the leaning Borzov holding off Glance.

Background

This was the eighteenth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Two finalists from 1972 returned: gold medal winner Valeriy Borzov of the Soviet Union and Hasely Crawford of Trinidad and Tobago, who had not finished the Munich final. The favorite was Jamaican Don Quarrie (1970 and 1974 Commonwealth Games champion, with a share of the world record at 9.9 seconds), particularly with American Steve Williams (who had run 9.9 seconds four times) having been injured at the U.S. Olympic trials. Borzov was "not the dominant sprinter he had been in 1972." The top American in Montreal was Harvey Glance, who had run the 9.9 second world record time twice. Cuban Silvio Leonard had also matched that time once. [2]

Three nations appeared in the event for the first time: Barbados, Belize, and the Netherlands Antilles. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first eighteen Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, that system applied only in the preliminary heats.

The first round consisted of 9 heats, each with 6–8 athletes. The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next five fastest runners overall. This made 32 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 4 heats of 8 runners. The top four runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with no "fastest loser" places. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2] [3]

Records

These are the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1976 Summer Olympics.

World Record9.95 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hines Mexico City (MEX)October 14, 1968
Olympic Record9.95 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hines Mexico City (MEX)October 14, 1968

Results

Heats

The heats were held on July 23, 1976.

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.42Q
2 Alexander Thieme Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.64Q
3 Luciano Caravani Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.66Q
4 Lambert Micha Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.69
5 Gregory Simons Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.76
6 Bjarni Stefánsson Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 11.28

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Johnny Lam Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.43Q
2 Amadou Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.53Q
3 Ainsley Armstrong Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.59Q
4 Mike Sharpe Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.70
5 Dominique Chauvelot Flag of France.svg  France 10.79
6 Mohamed Al-Sehly Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 11.10
7 Werner Bastians Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 11.17
8 Armando Padilla Flag of Nicaragua.svg  Nicaragua 11.52

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Petar Petrov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 10.46Q
2 Zenon Licznerski Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.60Q
3 Rui da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.61Q
4 Christer Garpenborg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.64q
5 Jean-Claude Amoureux Flag of France.svg  France 10.75
6 Abdul Kareem Al-Awad Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 11.27
7 Ayoub Bodaghi State Flag of Iran (1964-1980).svg  Iran 11.39

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Don Quarrie Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.38Q
2 Guy Abrahams Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.40Q
3 Marvin Nash Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.59Q
4 Mike Sands Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.65q
5 Dennis Trott Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.67q
6 Peter Fitzgerald Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.87
7 Ronald Russell Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 11.22

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harvey Glance Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.37Q
2 Marian Woronin Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.56Q
3 Aleksandr Aksinin Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.60Q
4 Colin Bradford Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.64q
5 Pedro Ferrer Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 10.76
6 Vasilios Papageorgopoulos Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece 10.82
7 Leonard Jervis Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.87

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Klaus-Dieter Kurrat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.37Q
2 Valeriy Borzov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.53Q
3 Dieter Steinmann Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.68Q
4 Francisco Gómez Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.68q
5 Barka Sy Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.81
6 Masahide Jinno Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.94
7 Colin Thurton Flag of British Honduras (1919-1981).svg  Belize 11.03
8 Siegfried Regales Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1959-1986).svg  Netherlands Antilles 11.11

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Steve Riddick Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.43Q
2 Andrzej Świerczyński Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.62Q
3 Adama Fall Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.72Q
4 Suchart Chairsuvaparb Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.75
5 Roland Bombardella Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 10.76
6 Clive Sands Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.82
7 Philippe Étienne Flag of Haiti (1964-1986).svg  Haiti 11.05

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Gilles Échevin Flag of France.svg  France 10.53Q
2 Klaus Bieler Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.58Q
3 Anat Ratanapol Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.71Q
4 Hermes Ramírez Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.72
5 Momar N'Dao Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.74
6 Ramli Ahmad Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 10.98

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Sammy Monsels Flag of Suriname.svg  Suriname 10.58Q
2 Silvio Leonard Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.62Q
3 Juris Silovs Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.70Q
4 Chris Brathwaite Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.71
5 Endre Lépold Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 10.82
6 Pearson Jordan Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.95
7 Tony Moore Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 11.16

Quarterfinals

The quarterfinals were held on July 23, 1976.

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Don Quarrie Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.33Q
2 Steve Riddick Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.36Q
3 Marvin Nash Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.48Q
4 Aleksandr Aksinin Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.55Q
5 Dennis Trott Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.64
6 Anat Ratanapol Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.65
7 Luciano Caravani Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.81
8 Gilles Échevin|Flag of France.svg  France 12.00

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Guy Abrahams Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.35Q
2 Johnny Lam Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.46Q
3 Alexander Thieme Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.50Q
4 Marian Woronin Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.53Q
5 Silvio Leonard Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.59
6 Sammy Monsels Flag of Suriname.svg  Suriname 10.61
7 Colin Bradford Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.62
8 Christer Garpenborg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.63

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.29Q
2 Valeriy Borzov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.39Q
3 Amadou Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.45Q
4 Rui da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.57Q
5 Andrzej Świerczyński Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.59
6 Adama Fall Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.60
7 Klaus Bieler Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.80
Mike Sands Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas DNS

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harvey Glance Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.23Q
2 Klaus-Dieter Kurrat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.29Q
3 Petar Petrov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 10.30Q
4 Ainsley Armstrong Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.46Q
5 Francisco Gómez Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.49
6 Zenon Licznerski Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.52
7 Dieter Steinmann Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.67
Juris Silovs Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union DNS

Semifinals

The semifinals were held on July 24, 1976.

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harvey Glance Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.24Q
2 Valeriy Borzov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.30Q
3 Klaus-Dieter Kurrat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.30Q
4 Guy Abrahams Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.37Q
5 Marvin Nash Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.52
6 Ainsley Armstrong Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.52
7 Rui da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.54
8 Marian Woronin Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.69

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.22Q
2 Don Quarrie Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.26Q
3 Johnny Lam Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.30Q
4 Petar Petrov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 10.30Q
5 Steve Riddick Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.33
6 Amadou Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.46
7 Aleksandr Aksinin Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.50
8 Alexander Thieme Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.50

Final

The final was held on July 24, 1976.

RankAthleteNationTime
Gold medal icon.svg Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.06
Silver medal icon.svg Don Quarrie Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.08
Bronze medal icon.svg Valeriy Borzov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.14
4 Harvey Glance Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.19
5 Guy Abrahams Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.25
6 Johnny Lam Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.27
7 Klaus-Dieter Kurrat Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10.31
8 Petar Petrov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 10.35

See also

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1976 Montreal Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  3. Official Report, vol. 3, p. 51.