Athletics at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Stadium Australia
Date22–23 September
Competitors97 from 71 nations
Winning time9.87
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Maurice Greene
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Ato Boldon
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Bronze medal icon.svg Obadele Thompson
Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados
  1996
2004  

The men's 100 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Stadium Australia from September 22 to 23. [1] Ninety-seven athletes from 71 nations competed. [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by American Maurice Greene, the United States's first title in the event since 1988 and 15th overall. Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago improved on his 1996 bronze with a silver in Sydney. Obadele Thompson won the first-ever medal in the men's 100 metres for Barbados with bronze.

Contents

Background

This was the twenty-fourth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Two finalists from 1996 returned: defending gold medalist Donovan Bailey of Canada and bronze medalist Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago. Two-time silver medalist Frankie Fredericks of Namibia was injured and unable to compete. The United States team was led by reigning world champion (1997 and 1999) and world record holder Maurice Greene. Boldon, the 1998 Commonwealth champion, was the main challenger to Greene. [2]

Albania, American Samoa, Brunei, Croatia, Georgia, Guam, Palau, and Saint Lucia appeared in the event for the first time. The United States made its 23rd appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Qualification

The qualification period for athletics took place between 1 January 1999 to 11 September 2000. For the men's 100 metres, each National Olympic Committee was permitted to enter up to three athletes that had run the race in 10.27 seconds or faster during the qualification period. If an NOC had no athletes that qualified under that standard, one athlete that had run the race in 10.40 seconds or faster could be entered.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in both the heats and quarterfinals.

The first round consisted of 11 heats, each with 9 athletes scheduled (1 heats had 7 actually run due to withdrawals). The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next seven fastest runners overall; due to a tie for the final "fastest loser" place, both men advanced. This made 41 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 5 heats of 8 runners, with an extra runner in one heat due to the tie. The top three runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with one "fastest loser" place. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of the United States.svg  Maurice Greene  (USA)9.79 s Athens, Greece 16 June 1999
Olympic recordFlag of Canada.svg  Donovan Bailey  (CAN)9.84 s Atlanta, United States 27 July 1996

No new records were set during the competition.

Schedule

All times are Australian Eastern Daylight Time (UTC+11:00)

DateTimeRound
Friday, 22 September 200011:35
20:45
Round 1
Round 2
Saturday, 23 September 200018:50
20:05
Semifinals
Final

Results

Round 1

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the seven (eight, after a tie for the seventh place occurred) fastest times of those who finished fourth or lower in their heat (q) qualified. [3]

Heat 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.31710.31Q
23 Patrick Johnson Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.15210.31Q
38 Venancio José Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0.16910.36Q
45 Martin Lachkovics Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0.15010.41q
56 Nicolas Macrozonaris Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.18910.45
62 Jamal Al-Saffar Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 0.16510.54
77 Lương Tích Thiện Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 0.24510.85
81 Pa Modou Gai Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 0.17311.03
94 Mario Bonello Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 0.15711.06
Wind: −0.6 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Marcin Nowak Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.16410.27Q
23 Sunday Emmanuel Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.15210.31Q
35 Freddy Mayola Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 0.15510.33Q
46 Sayon Cooper Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 0.16810.33q
54 David Patros Flag of France.svg  France 0.25810.38q
62 Chiang Wai Hung Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong 0.20010.64
71 Teymur Gasimov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 0.22710.97
87 Haseri Asli Flag of Brunei.svg  Brunei 0.25911.11
98 Sisomphone Vongphakdy Flag of Laos.svg  Laos 0.22111.47
Wind: −0.6 m/s

Heat 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
11 Curtis Johnson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.19410.30Q
29 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.15910.31Q
32 Georgios Theodoridis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 0.16910.34Q
46 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.19810.41q
58 Renward Wells Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.25210.47
65 Dejan Vojnović Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 0.13910.50SB
74 Tommi Hartonen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 0.23510.53
83 Seun Ogunkoya Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.19310.72
7 Fernando Arlete Flag of Guinea-Bissau.svg  Guinea-Bissau 0.197DNF
Wind: +0.4 m/s

Heat 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
12 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.23910.23Q
25 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.21410.35Q
37 Shingo Kawabata Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.16910.39Q
46 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.20910.40q
58 Raphael Oliveira Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.17910.44
64 Paul Brizzell Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 0.20510.62
73 Petko Yankov Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 0.22710.63
89 Christopher Adolf Flag of Palau.svg  Palau 0.14711.01 NR
91 Toluta'u Koula Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 0.21511.01
Wind: −0.5 m/s

Heat 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
11 Darren Campbell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.22410.28Q
27 Serge Bengono Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0.20010.35Q
35 Piotr Balcerzak Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.14610.42Q
49 Tommy Kafri Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 0.20710.43
52 Christian Nsiah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.15410.44
63 Francesco Scuderi Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.15210.50
74 Idrissa Sanou Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 0.23410.60
88 Youssouf Simpara Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 0.21810.82
6 Ronald Promesse Flag of Saint Lucia (1979-2002).svg  Saint Lucia 0.272DNF
Wind: −0.5 m/s

Heat 6

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.19510.31Q
25 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.24010.39Q
38 Joseph Batangdon Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0.19210.45Q
49 Andrea Colombo Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.26410.52
57 Watson Nyambek Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 0.17510.61
64 John Muray Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.18010.68
72 Teina Teiti Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 0.17011.22
1 Cherico Detenamo Flag of Nauru.svg  Nauru DNS
6 Angelos Pavlakakis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece DNS
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Heat 7

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
12 Stéphane Buckland Flag of Mauritius.svg  Mauritius 0.21810.35Q
21 Dwain Chambers Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.17110.38Q
36 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.23510.39Q
47 Marc Blume Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.26410.42
59 Paul di Bella Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.23110.52
64 Edgardo Antonio Serpas Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 0.16810.63
73 Hadhari Saindou Djaffar Flag of the Comoros (1996-2001).svg  Comoros 0.25010.68
85 Kelsey Nakanelua Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa 0.24510.93 NR
98 Jean Randriamamitiana Flag of Madagascar.svg  Madagascar 0.21012.50
Wind: +0.3 m/s

Heat 8

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.17010.04Q
21 Antoine Boussombo Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.17710.13Q, =NR
32 Leo Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.19310.15Q, SB
43 Ibrahim Meité Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.19110.24q, PB
56 Claudio Sousa Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.22210.31q
68 Anninos Marcoullides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 0.27810.32q, SB
75 Yanes Raubaba Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.24710.54
84 Oltion Luli Flag of Albania (1992-2002).svg  Albania 0.23511.08
97 Mamane Sani Ali Flag of Niger.svg  Niger 0.21911.25SB
Wind: +1.9 m/s

Heat 9

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Jonathan Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.19810.20Q
29 Matt Shirvington Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.24110.35Q
37 Patrick Jarrett Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14610.41Q
42 Anatoliy Dovhal Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 0.17410.48
58 Oscar Meneses Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 0.21210.54
61 Shigeyuki Kojima Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.21710.59
76 Caimin Douglas Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.25910.69
83 Abraham Kepsin Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu 0.17211.12PB
94 Philam Garcia Flag of Guam.svg  Guam 0.22011.21
Wind: +0.3 m/s

Heat 10

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
11 Jason Gardener Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.18810.38Q
23 Lindel Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15410.45Q
35 Kostyantyn Rurak Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 0.22410.48Q
44 Sherwin Vries Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 0.16510.53
52 Niconnor Alexander Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.14910.56
69 Sergey Bychkov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.18310.68
78 Ruslan Rusidze Flag of Georgia (1990-2004).svg  Georgia 0.16610.70
87 Alpha Kamara Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 0.16210.74
96 Vitaliy Medvedev Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 0.20910.75
Wind: −0.7 m/s

Heat 11

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Christopher Williams Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.18610.35Q
25 Mathew Quinn Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.17010.44Q
37 Koji Ito Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.23410.45Q
46 Héber Viera Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 0.24610.54
54 Gabriel Simon Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 0.16610.56
68 Erwin Heru Susanto Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.16410.87
71 Moumi Sebergue Flag of Chad.svg  Chad 0.24911.00
89 Guillermo Dongo Flag of Suriname.svg  Suriname 0.19711.10
92 Nelson Lucas Flag of Seychelles.svg  Seychelles 0.21811.15
Wind: −1.2 m/s

Quarterfinals

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next fastest overall sprinter (q) qualified. [4]

Quarterfinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.18210.10Q
22 Leo Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.14510.23Q
35 Sunday Emmanuel Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.16510.36Q
46 Marcin Nowak Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.18610.37
58 Sayon Cooper Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 0.14710.37
61 Ibrahim Meité Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.19110.40
73 Serge Bengono Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0.22210.46
87 Shingo Kawabata Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.18410.60
Wind: −1.7 m/s

Quarterfinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.15510.11Q
24 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.22210.19Q
32 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.13010.20Q
45 Jason Gardener Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.17710.27
56 Christopher Williams Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.18710.30
68 Freddy Mayola Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 0.14410.35
71 Piotr Balcerzak Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.15210.38
89 Martin Lachkovics Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0.18910.44
97 Joseph Batangdon Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0.23110.52
Wind: +0.3 m/s

Quarterfinal 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.18710.04Q
25 Matt Shirvington Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.14210.13Q
36 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.19310.22Q
42 Lindel Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.18510.23q
54 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.19110.28
67 David Patros Flag of France.svg  France 0.24110.33
78 Kostyantyn Rurak Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 0.19110.38
81 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.21611.36
Wind: +0.8 m/s

Quarterfinal 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Dwain Chambers Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.15010.12Q
25 Jonathan Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14510.15Q
31 Koji Ito Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.22110.25Q, SB
46 Stéphane Buckland Flag of Mauritius.svg  Mauritius 0.15010.26
53 Antoine Boussombo Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.19010.27
67 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.16210.27
72 Mathew Quinn Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.15710.27
88 Patrick Jarrett Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.18416.40
Wind: +0.8 m/s

Quarterfinal 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Darren Campbell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.22910.21Q
23 Curtis Johnson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14210.24Q
34 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.18110.29Q
47 Georgios Theodoridis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 0.14410.29
56 Patrick Johnson Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.23610.44
61 Claudio Sousa Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.18210.47
78 Anninos Marcoullides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 0.18310.48
82 Venancio José Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0.18910.53
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Semifinals

Qualification rule: The first four runners in each semifinal heat (Q) moves on to the final. [5]

Semifinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Dwain Chambers Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.16410.14Q
24 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.18910.15Q
33 Darren Campbell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.16110.19Q
46 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.18410.20Q
57 Leo Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.22010.25
61 Curtis Johnson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14610.27
72 Koji Ito Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.21710.39
88 Lindel Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.20310.46
Wind: +0.4 m/s

Semifinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.22710.06Q
23 Jonathan Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.13710.10Q
34 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.21210.13Q
41 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.23610.16Q
56 Matt Shirvington Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.16610.26
68 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.25310.32
77 Sunday Emmanuel Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.16310.45
2 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.151DNF
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Final

The three medallists celebrating Mens 100m medalists, Sydney2000.jpg
The three medallists celebrating

Zakari was injured at about the 35 metre mark and did not finish. [6]

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTime
Gold medal icon.svg5 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1979.87
Silver medal icon.svg8 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.1369.99
Bronze medal icon.svg4 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.21610.04
43 Dwain Chambers Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.17410.08SB
56 Jon Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14710.09
61 Darren Campbell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.19310.13
77 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.21010.17
2 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.180DNF
Wind: −0.3 m/s

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References

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  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 25 July 2020.
  3. "IAAF Sydney 2000: Men's 100m Heats". Sydney 2000 . IAAF . Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  4. "IAAF Sydney 2000: Men's 100m Quarterfinals". Sydney 2000 . IAAF . Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  5. "IAAF Sydney 2000: Men's 100m Semifinals". Sydney 2000 . IAAF . Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  6. "IAAF Sydney 2000: Men's 100m Final". Sydney 2000 . IAAF . Retrieved 1 December 2017.