Blowin' Away

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Blowin' Away
Blowinaway.jpg
Studio album by
Joan Baez
ReleasedJune 1977
Recorded1977
Genre Folk
Length40:24
Label Portrait
Producer David Kershenbaum, Bernard Gelb
Joan Baez chronology
Gulf Winds
(1976)
Blowin' Away
(1977)
Best of Joan C. Baez
(1977)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
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Rolling Stone (no rating) link

Blowin' Away is a 1977 album by Joan Baez, her first after switching from A&M Records to Portrait Records (a then newly created division of CBS Records).

Contents

Overview

The album veered more toward mainstream pop than any album Baez had recorded up to that point, though many critics at the time pointed out that she seemed not entirely comfortable with her "new sound". Among the songs covered were the Rod Stewart hit "Sailing", and the standard "Cry Me a River", in addition to a number of Baez' own compositions. The sardonic "Time Rag" recounts an aborted attempt at an interview by a Time magazine reporter. Throughout the course of the song, she admits to studio executives wanting to spruce up her image to ensure that she'd once again sell well. "I really should tell you that deep in my heart/I don't give a damn where I stand on the charts", she wryly comments toward the song's closing.

From "Time Rag":

"Curious about his interest, I babbled my way through the worldwide list; Ireland, Chile and the African states; Poetry, politics and how they relate; Motherhood, music and Moog synthesizers; Political prisoners and Commie sympathizers; Hetero, homo and bisexuality; Where they all stand in the nineteen-seventies."

Baez wrote "Altar Boy and the Thief" as a tribute to her gay fanbase.

In her autobiography, "And a Voice to Sing With", Baez described Blowin' Away as "a good album with a terrible cover".

Track listing

All tracks composed by Joan Baez; except where indicated

  1. "Sailing" (Gavin Sutherland) – 4:22
  2. "Many a Mile to Freedom" (Steve Winwood, Anna Capaldi) – 2:58
  3. "Miracles" – 5:24
  4. "Yellow Coat" (Steve Goodman) – 3:37
  5. "Time Rag" – 5:25
  6. "A Heartfelt Line or Two" – 3:23
  7. "I'm Blowin' Away" (Eric Kaz) – 3:18
  8. "Luba the Baroness" – 7:06
  9. "Altar Boy and the Thief" – 3:28
  10. "Cry Me a River" (Arthur Hamilton) – 3:00

Personnel

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