Coat of arms of Kenya

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Coat of arms of Kenya
Coat of arms of Kenya (Official).svg
Armiger Republic of Kenya
Adopted1963
Blazon Per fess sable and vert, on a fess gules fimbriated argent a cock grasping in the dexter claw an axe also argent.
Supporters On either side a lion or, grasping in the interior forepaw a spear of estate, the hafts of the spears crossed in saltire behind the shield.
Compartment The whole upon a compartment representing Mount Kenya proper.
Motto Harambee
(Let's pull together in Swahili)

The coat of arms of Kenya features two lions, a symbol of protection, holding spears and a traditional East African shield. The shield and spears symbolize unity and defence of freedom. The shield contains the national colours, representing: [1]

Contents

On the shield is a rooster holding an axe while moving forward, portraying authority, the will to work, success, and the break of a new dawn. It is also the symbol of Kenya African National Union (KANU) party that led the country to independence.

The shield and lions stand on a silhouette of Mount Kenya containing in the foreground examples of Kenya agricultural produce - coffee, pyrethrum, sisal, tea, maize and pineapples.

The coat of arms is supported by a scroll upon which is written the word 'Harambee'. In Swahili, Harambee means "pulling together" or "all for one".

Description

Kenya national law lays forth a heraldic blazon, or official description of the coat of arms: [2]

Arms.— Per fess sable and vert, on a fess gules fimbriated argent a cock grasping in the dexter claw an axe also argent.

Supporters.— On either side a lion or, grasping in the interior forepaw a spear of estate, the hafts of the spears crossed in saltire behind the shield.

The whole upon a compartment representing Mount Kenya proper.

Motto.— Harambee.

See also

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References

  1. https://web.archive.org/web/20160414141638/http://arkafrica.com/projects/kenya-coat-arms
  1. Kenya National Archives. "Kenya Armorial Ensigns". Archived from the original on 2006-06-10. Retrieved 2008-07-31.
  2. Laws of Kenya: National Flag, Emblems, and Names Act