Efficiency Medal

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Efficiency Medal
Efficiency Medal (Militia) George VI.jpg
First King George VI version with a "MILITIA" suspender bar
TypeMilitary long service medal
Awarded forTwelve years of efficient service
Country Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom
Presented by the Monarch of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India
EligibilityPart-time other ranks and some officers
Clasps For further periods of 6 years service
StatusStill current in New Zealand
Established1930
Ribbon - Efficiency Medal (South Africa).png Ribbon - Volunteer Long Service Medal HAC.png Ribbon - Efficiency Medal (T&AVR).png
Original, HAC and 1967 ribbon bars
Order of wear
Next (higher) Territorial Efficiency Medal
Equivalent Efficiency Medal (New Zealand)
Efficiency Medal (South Africa)
Next (lower) Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The Efficiency Medal was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of efficient service on the active list of the Militia or the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom, or of the other Auxiliary Military Forces throughout the British Empire. At the same time a clasp was instituted for award to holders of the medal upon completion of further periods of six years of efficient service. [1]

Contents

The medal superseded the Volunteer Long Service Medal, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal, the Militia Long Service Medal, the Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal and the Territorial Efficiency Medal. [1]

In the British Commonwealth, the Efficiency Medal was gradually superseded by national medals in some member countries, in Canada by the Canadian Forces Decoration in 1951, in the Union of South Africa by the John Chard Medal in 1952 and in Australia by the Reserve Force Medal in 1982. In the United Kingdom the medal was superseded by the Volunteer Reserves Service Medal in 1999. New Zealand continues to award the Efficiency Medal (New Zealand) and is one of a few countries to still do so. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Origin

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks in the part-time Volunteer Force of the United Kingdom. In 1896 the grant of this medal was extended to members of Volunteer Forces throughout the British Empire and a separate new medal was instituted, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies. The latter medal was superseded by the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal in 1899, but continued to be awarded by the Isle of Man, Bermuda and the Indian Empire. [9] [10] [11]

The Militia Long Service Medal and the Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal were instituted in the United Kingdom in 1904 and 1908 respectively. Also in 1908, when the Territorial Force was formed, the Volunteer Long Service Medal was superseded by the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, which itself was superseded by the Territorial Efficiency Medal in 1921 when the Territorial Force became the Territorial Army. [12] [13] [14]

Institution

The Efficiency Medal was instituted by Royal Warrant on 23 September 1930, as a long service award for part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the Militia or the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom, and of the Auxiliary Military Forces of the British Dominions, Colonies and Protectorates and India. At the same time a clasp was instituted, for award to recipients of the medal upon completion of further periods of efficient service. [1] [15]

The medal consolidated the various existing long service medals for part-time service into one medal to reward the long service and good conduct of warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men throughout the British Empire. It superseded the Volunteer Long Service Medal, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal, the Militia Long Service Medal, the Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal and the Territorial Efficiency Medal. [1]

The medal bears a subsidiary title to denote whether the recipient qualified for its award while serving in the Militia or the Territorial Army or in one of the other Auxiliary Military Forces of the Empire. The subsidiary title was inscribed on a scroll bar attached to the medal suspender, "MILITIA", "TERRITORIAL" or "T.& A.V.R." in respect of the United Kingdom's Militia, Territorial Army and Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve respectively, or the name of the applicable country in respect of other Auxiliary Military Forces. [1] [15]

The equivalent award for commissioned officers was the Efficiency Decoration. [1]

Award criteria

The medal could be awarded to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of continuous efficient service on the active list of the Militia, the Territorial Army or of any other Auxiliary Military Force of the British Empire. War service was reckoned two-fold, as did service in West Africa, although service by natives of West Africa and periods spent on leave counted only singly. Service during the period from 3 September 1939 to 1 March 1950 inclusive need not have been continuous, while breaks in service under certain specified conditions, though not counting as qualifying service, were not considered as a break in the twelve years of continuous service qualifying for the medal. [1] [15] [16]

Clasps could initially be awarded to holders of the medal upon completion of eighteen and twenty-four years of efficient service. This was amended on 26 August 1944 to authorise the award of additional clasps for each additional completed period of six years of efficient service after twenty-four years. [1] [17] Post war, the maximum number of clasps awarded to one recipient is six. [18]

A further amendment on 10 May 1946 made part-time officers who served during the Second World War also eligible for the award of the medal and clasp, provided they were serving on the active list of the Territorial Army, the Auxiliary Territorial Service or any Auxiliary Military Force on 2 September 1939 and were embodied or called up for war service. The reason for this amendment originated from the anomaly that, during the war, a large number of officers were commissioned from the ranks, and merely by the fact that they were so promoted owing to their efficiency, would be denied the right to the Efficiency Medal. Such officers were allowed to reckon their service as officers as qualifying service for the medal and clasps. Officers who had already qualified for the award of the Efficiency Decoration before that date were, however, not eligible. [17] [19]

Order of wear

In the order of wear prescribed by the British Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, the Efficiency Medal takes precedence after the Territorial Efficiency Medal and before the Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. [20]

Description

The medal was struck in silver and is oval, 39 millimetres (1.54 inches) high and 32 millimetres (1.26 inches) wide. The fixed suspender bar, a pair of laurel leaves, is affixed to the medal by means of a single-toe claw and a horizontal pin through the upper edge of the medal. The suspender is decorated on the obverse with a scroll-pattern bar, inscribed to indicate the military force in which the recipient was serving at the time of qualification for the award. [1] [14] [16]

Obverse

Six versions of the medal have been awarded, the sixth only in Canada. The obverse has a raised rim on all versions and bears the crowned effigy of the reigning monarch. [14] [16]

King George V version with a "TERRITORIAL" suspender bar Efficiency Medal (Territorial) George V.jpg
King George V version with a "TERRITORIAL" suspender bar
Second King George VI version with a "TERRITORIAL" suspender bar Efficiency Medal (Territorial) George VI v2.jpg
Second King George VI version with a "TERRITORIAL" suspender bar
First Queen Elizabeth II version with a "SOUTH AFRICA" suspender bar Efficiency Medal (South Africa) Elizabeth II v1.jpg
First Queen Elizabeth II version with a "SOUTH AFRICA" suspender bar
Second Queen Elizabeth II version with a "T.& A.V.R." suspender bar Efficiency Medal (T&AVR) Elizabeth II.jpg
Second Queen Elizabeth II version with a "T.& A.V.R." suspender bar
Third Queen Elizabeth II version with a "CANADA" suspender bar Efficiency Medal (Canada) Elizabeth II.jpg
Third Queen Elizabeth II version with a "CANADA" suspender bar

Scroll bar

Three suspender scroll bar inscriptions were used on medals awarded to members of part-time forces in the United Kingdom. [14]

Medals awarded to members of the Auxiliary Military Forces of the British Dominions, Colonies and Protectorates and India bore scroll bars inscribed with the names of the respective countries. All six obverse versions of the medal were used for the Auxiliary Military Forces, but no country awarded all six versions. [14] [16]

South Africa

First King George VI version with a bilingual reverse and "UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA" "UNIE VAN SUID-AFRIKA" suspender bar Efficiency Medal (South Africa) George VI.jpg
First King George VI version with a bilingual reverse and "UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA" "UNIE VAN SUID-AFRIKA" suspender bar

The South African version of the medal was unique since the inscriptions on the scroll bar and the reverse of the medal were bilingual, in English and Afrikaans on the scroll bar and in Afrikaans and English on the medal's reverse. [3] [5] [14]

The English-only Queen Elizabeth II version of the Efficiency Medal (South Africa), of which a miniature is depicted above to illustrate the first Queen Elizabeth II version of the obverse, was never awarded since the medal was superseded within a few months of the Queen's succession to the throne. [3] [4] [5]

Reverse

The reverse is smooth with a raised rim and bears the inscription "FOR EFFICIENT SERVICE" in three lines. On the South African version, the Afrikaans and English inscriptions are "VIR BEKWAME DIENS" and "FOR EFFICIENT SERVICE", each language in three lines and the languages separated by a 13 millimetres long line. The name of the recipient was impressed on the rim of the medal. [1] [3] [5] [14] [16]

Clasps

Clasp versions:
Top: Elizabeth II
Below: George V & VI Efficiency Medal GVI & EII clasps.jpg
Clasp versions:
Top: Elizabeth II
Below: George V & VI

Two versions of the clasp were created. The King George V version, illustrated at the bottom alongside, is decorated with an embossed Tudor Crown and remained unaltered during the reign of King George VI. The Queen Elizabeth II version, illustrated at the top alongside, is decorated with an embossed Saint Edward's Crown. The clasps were struck in silver and were designed to be sewn onto the medal ribbon. [1] [16]

Ribbons

Three ribbons are used with the medal, all 32 millimetres wide. In the United Kingdom, an alternative ribbon is used when the medal is awarded to members of the Honourable Artillery Company, while a new regular ribbon was introduced in 1967. [14]

Army Emergency Reserve Efficiency Medal

Version with "ARMY EMERGENCY RESERVE" suspender bar Army Emergency Reserve Efficiency Medal.png
Version with "ARMY EMERGENCY RESERVE" suspender bar

A separate Army Emergency Reserve Efficiency Medal was instituted in September 1953 to reward long service in the Army Supplementary Reserve from 1924, and the Army Emergency Reserve from 1948. Awards were made on the same basis as the Efficiency Medal, with the same design of medal, save for the scroll bar which bore the inscription "Army Emergency Reserve" and the ribbon, which was dark blue ribbon with three yellow stripes towards the centre. The medal ceased to be awarded after 1967 on the creation of the Territorial and Army Volunteer Reserve, when it was replaced by the Efficiency Medal with scroll bar inscribed T. & A.V.R. [32]

Officers in the Emergency Reserve were eligible for the Emergency Reserve Decoration. [32]

Discontinuation

New Zealand continues to award the Efficiency Medal (New Zealand) and is one of a few countries to still do so. In the United Kingdom and some countries of the Commonwealth the medal was gradually superseded by new national medals. [8]

Related Research Articles

The Canadian Forces' Decoration is a Canadian award bestowed upon members of the Canadian Armed Forces who have completed twelve years of military service, with certain conditions. By convention, it is also given to the Governor General of Canada upon his or her appointment as viceroy, which includes the title of Commander-in-Chief in and over Canada. The decoration is awarded to all ranks, who must have a good record of conduct during the final eight years of claimed service.

Territorial Decoration

The Territorial Decoration (TD) was a military medal of the United Kingdom awarded for long service in the Territorial Force and its successor, the Territorial Army. This award superseded the Volunteer Officer's Decoration when the Territorial Force was formed on 1 April 1908, following the enactment of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907, which was a large reorganisation of the old Volunteer Army and the remaining units of militia and Yeomanry. However, the Militia were transferred to the Special Reserve rather than becoming part of the Territorial Force. A recipient of this award is entitled to use the letters "TD" after their name (post-nominal).

Volunteer Officers Decoration Award

The Volunteer Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was instituted in 1892 as an award for long and meritorious service by officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the decoration was discontinued in the United Kingdom when it was superseded by the Territorial Decoration in 1908, but it continued to be awarded in some Crown Dependencies until 1930.

Air Efficiency Award

The Air Efficiency Award, post-nominal letters AE for officers, was instituted in 1942. It could be awarded after ten years of meritorious service to officers, airmen and airwomen in the Auxiliary and Volunteer Air Forces of the United Kingdom and the Territorial Air Forces and Air Force Reserves of the Dominions, the Indian Empire, Burma, the Colonies and Protectorates.

Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Award

The Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, post-nominal letters VD until c. 1947 and VRD thereafter, was instituted in 1908. It could be awarded to part-time commissioned officers in the United Kingdom's Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve after twenty years of service as efficient and thoroughly capable officers. The decoration was a Naval version of the Volunteer Officers' Decoration and its successor, the Territorial Decoration.

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal Award

The Territorial Force Efficiency Medal was a United Kingdom award for long service in the Territorial Force between 1908 and 1921.

Efficiency Decoration Award

The Efficiency Decoration, post-nominal letters TD for recipients serving in the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom or ED for those serving in the Auxiliary Military Forces, was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time officers after twenty years of service as an efficient and thoroughly capable officer. The decoration superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration and the Territorial Decoration.

Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) Award

The Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) is a medal awarded to regular members of the armed forces. It was instituted by King George V in 1930 and replaced the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal as well as the Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Medal. The medal was originally awarded to Regular Army warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the UK Armed Forces. It also had a number of territorial versions for the Permanent Forces of the British Dominions. The eligibility criteria were relaxed in 1947 to also allow the award of the medal to officers who had served a minimum period in the ranks before being commissioned. Since 2016, the eligibility was widened to include officers who had never served in the ranks, and so the medal can now be awarded to all regular members of the British Army who meet the required length of service.

Efficiency Decoration (South Africa) Award

The Efficiency Decoration , post-nominal letters ED, was instituted in 1930 for award to efficient and thoroughly capable part-time officers in the Citizen Force of the Union of South Africa after twenty years of service. The decoration superseded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration.

Efficiency Medal (South Africa) Award

The Efficiency Medal was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of efficient service on the active list of the Citizen Force of the Union of South Africa. At the same time, a clasp was instituted for award to holders of the medal upon completion of further periods of six years of efficient service. The medal superseded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration Award

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was established in 1899 as recognition for long and meritorious service as a part-time commissioned officer in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates. It superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies in all these territories, but not in the Indian Empire.

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Award

The Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, initially designated the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service Medal, was instituted in 1908. It could be awarded to part-time ratings in the United Kingdom's Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve after twelve years of service and good conduct. The medal was a Naval version of the Volunteer Long Service Medal and its successor, the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal.

Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Medal Award

The Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Medal is a long service and good conduct medal, instituted for award to other ranks of the Permanent Forces of the Dominions and Colonies of the British Empire. The medal, also known as the Permanent Overseas Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, was established in 1910 as a single common award to supersede the several local versions of the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal which were being awarded by the various territories.

Militia Long Service Medal Award

The Militia Long Service Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom between 1904 and 1930.

Volunteer Long Service Medal Award

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks and some officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the medal was discontinued when it was superseded by the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal in 1908.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Award

The Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was instituted by King William IV in 1830. The medal remained in use for 100 years, until it was replaced by the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) in 1930. During that time the reverse of the medal remained virtually unchanged, while the design of the obverse was altered during the reigns of Queen Victoria, King Edward VII and King George V.

Royal Air Force Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Award

The Royal Air Force Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is a medal awarded to regular members of the Royal Air Force in recognition of long service. It was instituted by King George V in 1919, the year following the establishment of the world's first independent air force. At first, the medal was awarded to Regular Force non-commissioned officers and airmen of the Royal Air Force. The award criteria were later relaxed to also allow the award of the medal to officers who had served a minimum period in the ranks before being commissioned. Since 2016, it is awarded to all regular members of the RAF, including officers who had never served in the ranks.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal Award

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1899 as a military long service award for part-time members of all ranks in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates throughout the British Empire. The medal gradually superseded the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies in all these territories, with the exception of the Isle of Man, Bermuda and the Indian Empire.

Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies Award

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks and some officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. In 1896, the grant of the medal was extended to other ranks and officers who had served in the ranks of the Volunteer Forces throughout the British Empire. A separate new medal was instituted, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies. Awarding of this medal was discontinued in stages when it was superseded in most territories by the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal in 1899 and in the remainder by the Efficiency Medal in 1930.

Queens Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces Award

The Medal for the Best Shot in the British Army, Infantry, was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1869 and was awarded annually from 1870 to 1882 to the best shot of the Infantry of the British Army, including the Royal Engineers and the Colonial Corps.

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