Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

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Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, obverse.png Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, reverse.png
Obverse and reverse of the medal
Awarded by the United Kingdom
TypeLong service and good conduct medal
EligibilityEfficient and irreproachable service in the Special Reserve
Awarded forAwarded for 15 years service and attending 15 annual camps.
StatusSuperseded by the Efficiency Medal
Statistics
Established1908
Last awarded1930
Total awarded1,078
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Efficiency Medal [1]
Next (lower) Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve [1]
Related Militia Long Service Medal
The Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.PNG
Ribbon bar

The Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom. The medal was awarded for service in the Army Special Reserve, or a combination of service in the Special Reserve and other part-time military forces. Awarded between 1908 and 1930, the medal was only awarded 1,078 times.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom, officially the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland but more commonly known as the UK or Britain, is a sovereign country lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Contents

Obverse 1911-1930 Militia Long Service Medal, obverse, King George V.jpg
Obverse 1911-1930

Award criteria

The medal was established in June 1908 by King Edward VII after, as part of the Haldane Reforms, the Special Reserve replaced the Militia, [2] the new medal superseding the Militia Long Service Medal. It was awarded to privates and non-commissioned officers for 15 years efficient and irreproachable service in the Special Reserve and attending 15 annual trainings, although members of the two Irish Yeomanry regiments qualified with 10 years service and 10 annual trainings. [3] [4] Qualifying service for the medal could come from service in the Militia, Imperial Yeomanry, Volunteer Force, or Territorial Force, but not the Regular Army, as long as the last five years was in the Militia or Special Reserve. [3] [5] The medal was superseded by the Efficiency Medal in 1930. [6]

Edward VII King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India

Edward VII was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

Haldane Reforms

The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard Burdon Haldane. They were the first major reforms since the "Childers Reforms" of the early 1880s, and were made in the light of lessons newly learned in the Second Boer War.

Special Reserve Wikipedia disambiguation page

The Special Reserve was established on 1 April 1908 with the function of maintaining a reservoir of manpower for the British Army and training replacement drafts in times of war. Its formation was part of the military reforms implemented by Richard Haldane, the Secretary of State for War, which also created the Territorial Force. Haldane originally intended that the Militia would provide the reserve, but opposition from its representatives forced him to abolish it and create the Special Reserve instead. Only 60 per cent of the Militia transferred into the new reserve, and it was consistently under strength, particularly in officers. Reservists enlisted for a six-year term of service, and had to undergo six months of basic training on recruitment and three to four weeks training annually. The Special Reserve was organised into battalions, providing a third for each of the regular army's 74 two-battalion infantry regiments. In addition to providing replacements to the regular army, the Special Reserve was deployed on home defence duties guarding the coast and key installations during the First World War. The routine nature of its duties meant that scant attention was paid to it in regimental histories. After the war, the Special Reserve was abolished and the Militia was resurrected in 1921 to take on its former role. No effort was made to restart recruitment, and in 1924 the new Militia's functions were absorbed into the Supplementary Reserve.

No recipient could receive both this and the concurrently awarded Territorial Force Efficiency Medal. [3]

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal

The Territorial Force Efficiency Medal was a United Kingdom award for long service in the Territorial Force between 1908 and 1921.

Awards were published in Army Orders, with a total of 1,078 medals awarded: 428 bearing the effigy of King Edward VII and 650 with that of George V. In terms of unit, the following were conferred: Royal Artillery: 164; Royal Engineers: 9; Anglesey Royal Engineers: 3; Monmouthshire Regiment: 5; RAMC: 4; Labour Corps: 4; Machine Gun Corps: 1; North Irish Horse: 16; South Irish Horse: 30; King Edward's Horse: 14; Infantry: 823; Channel Islands (Jersey and Guernsey): 5. [7] [8]

George V King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India

George V was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936.

Royal Artillery artillery arm of the British Army

The Royal Regiment of Artillery, commonly referred to as the Royal Artillery (RA) and colloquially known as "The Gunners", is the artillery arm of the British Army. The Royal Regiment of Artillery comprises thirteen Regular Army regiments, King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and five Army Reserve regiments.

Royal Engineers corps of the British Army

The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army.

Appearance

The Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is a silver 32 millimetres (1.3 in) wide oval shaped medal of the following design: [8]
The obverse depicts the bust of the reigning King in Field Marshall's uniform facing left. Originally Edward VII was shown, with the legend, EDWARDVS VII REX IMPERATOR. In 1911 the image was changed to that of George V, the legend reading GEORGIVS V BRITT: OMN: REX ET IND: IMP:.
The reverse bears the words SPECIAL RESERVE arched above FOR LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT on four lines.
A claw suspension and ring suspender attaches the medal from a 32 mm wide dark blue ribbon with a centre stripe of light blue. [9]
The recipient's service number, rank, name, and unit were impressed on the edge of the medal. [3]

Obverse and reverse front and back side of coins, medals, orders of merit, and paper bills

Obverse and its opposite, reverse, refer to the two flat faces of coins and some other two-sided objects, including paper money, flags, seals, medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art, and printed fabrics. In this usage, obverse means the front face of the object and reverse means the back face. The obverse of a coin is commonly called heads, because it often depicts the head of a prominent person, and the reverse tails.

Related Research Articles

Distinguished Conduct Medal United Kingdom military decoration for bravery

The Distinguished Conduct Medal, post-nominal letters DCM, was established in 1854 by Queen Victoria as a decoration for gallantry in the field by other ranks of the British Army. It is the oldest British award for gallantry and was a second level military decoration, ranking below the Victoria Cross, until its discontinuation in 1993 when it was replaced by the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. The medal was also awarded to non-commissioned military personnel of other Commonwealth Dominions and Colonies.

Territorial Decoration military medal of the United Kingdom

The Territorial Decoration (TD) was a military medal of the United Kingdom awarded for long service in the Territorial Force and its successor, the Territorial Army. This award superseded the Volunteer Officer's Decoration when the Territorial Force was formed on 1 April 1908, following the enactment of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907, which was a large reorganisation of the old Volunteer Army and the remaining units of militia and Yeomanry. However, the Militia were transferred to the Special Reserve rather than becoming part of the Territorial Force. A recipient of this award is entitled to the letters "TD" after their name (post-nominal).

Volunteer Officers Decoration military service decoration of the United Kingdom

The Volunteer Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was instituted in 1892 as an award for long and meritorious service by officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the decoration was discontinued in the United Kingdom when it was superseded by the Territorial Decoration in 1908, but it continued to be awarded in some Crown Dependencies until 1930.

King Edward's Horse was a cavalry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1901, which saw service in the First World War.

Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

The Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, post-nominal letters VD until c. 1947 and VRD thereafter, was instituted in 1908. It could be awarded to part-time commissioned officers in the United Kingdom's Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve after twenty years of service as efficient and thoroughly capable officers. The decoration was a Naval version of the Volunteer Officers' Decoration and its successor, the Territorial Decoration.

Territorial Efficiency Medal

The Territorial Efficiency Medal (TEM) was a United Kingdom award for long service in the Territorial Army. It superseded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal when the Territorial Force became the Territorial Army in 1921. It was superseded by the Efficiency Medal in 1930.

Efficiency Medal

The Efficiency Medal was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of efficient service on the active list of the Militia or the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom, or of the other Auxiliary Military Forces throughout the British Empire. At the same time a clasp was instituted for award to holders of the medal upon completion of further periods of six years of efficient service.

South Irish Horse

The South Irish Horse was a Special Reserve cavalry regiment of the British Army. Formed on 2 January 1902 as the South of Ireland Imperial Yeomanry. It was renamed as the South Irish Horse from 7 July 1908 and transferred to the Special Reserve (Cavalry). Having taken part in the fighting of the First World War, it was disbanded in 1922.

Efficiency Decoration

The Efficiency Decoration, post-nominal letters TD for recipients serving in the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom or ED for those serving in the Auxiliary Military Forces, was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time officers after twenty years of service as an efficient and thoroughly capable officer. The decoration superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration and the Territorial Decoration.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was established in 1899 as recognition for long and meritorious service as a part-time commissioned officer in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates. It superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies in all these territories, but not in the Indian Empire.

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, initially designated the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service Medal, was instituted in 1908. It could be awarded to part-time ratings in the United Kingdom's Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve after twelve years of service and good conduct. The medal was a Naval version of the Volunteer Long Service Medal and its successor, the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal.

Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Medal

The Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Medal is a long service and good conduct medal, instituted for award to other ranks of the Permanent Forces of the Dominions and Colonies of the British Empire. The medal, also known as the Permanent Overseas Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, was established in 1910 as a single common award to supersede the several local versions of the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal which were being awarded by the various territories.

Militia Long Service Medal

The Militia Long Service Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom between 1904 and 1930.

Volunteer Long Service Medal

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks and some officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the medal was discontinued when it was superseded by the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal in 1908.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was instituted by King William IV in 1830. The medal remained in use for 100 years, until it was replaced by the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) in 1930. During that time the reverse of the medal remained virtually unchanged, while the design of the obverse was altered during the reigns of Queen Victoria, King Edward VII and King George V.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (Natal)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to their local military forces. The Colony of Natal introduced this system in August 1895 and, in 1897, instituted the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (Natal).

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1899 as a military long service award for part-time members of all ranks in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates throughout the British Empire. The medal gradually superseded the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies in all these territories, with the exception of the Isle of Man, Bermuda and the Indian Empire.

Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal

The Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom. It is no longer awarded.

Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks and some officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. In 1896, the grant of the medal was extended to other ranks and officers who had served in the ranks of the Volunteer Forces throughout the British Empire. A separate new medal was instituted, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies. Awarding of this medal was discontinued in stages when it was superseded in most territories by the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal in 1899 and in the remainder by the Efficiency Medal in 1930.

References

  1. 1 2 "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3353.
  2. Ian F. W. Beckett (2011). Britain's Part-Time Soldiers: The Amateur Military Tradition: 1558–1945. Barnsley, Yorkshire: Pen & Sword. p. 206–216. ISBN   9781848843950.
  3. 1 2 3 4 D. W. Collett, editor. Medal Year Book 1981. p. 182. Published by Medals Yearbook, London E4.
  4. This ensured consistent criteria with the former Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal, for which the two Irish Yeomanry regiments qualified prior to April 1908.
  5. Duckers, Peter. "British Military Medals: A Guide for the Collector and Family Historian Second Edition". Pen and Sword. Retrieved 24 June 2015.
  6. "No. 33653". The London Gazette . 17 October 1930. p. 6311.
  7. J. M. A. Tamplin. The Special Reserve LS&GC Medal. p. 8. Published by Spink & Son, London. 1979. Figures exclude two cancelled awards.
  8. 1 2 John W. Mussell, editor. Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 238. Published Token Publishing Limited, Honiton, Devon.
  9. "Object Number: CM.1312-2009". Fitzwilliam Museum. Retrieved 25 June 2015.