Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

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Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
George Medal, Queen Elizabeth, second obverse.png Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, reverse.png
Obverse and reverse of the medal
(Scottish awards have a different reverse)
TypeLong service and good conduct medal
Awarded for20 years of service
Presented bythe United Kingdom
EligibilityAssociate Ambulance Practitioners (AAP), Ambulance Technicians, A&E Support Clinicians, Ambulance Nurses, Community First Responders (CFR) (trained to FREC 5 or higher), Emergency Ambulance Crews (EAC), Paramedics and Ambulance Officers
StatusCurrently awarded
Established5 July 1995 [1]
Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.png
Ribbon bar of the medal
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Civil Defence Long Service Medal [2]
Next (lower) Royal Fleet Auxiliary Service Medal [2]

The Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is a long service medal of the United Kingdom established in 1995. The medal is awarded to recognise long service by all clinical grades of the ambulance services who serve on emergency duty.

Contents

Criteria

The Ambulance Service (Emergency Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is presented for 20 years commendable service to all clinical grades, such as Associate Ambulance Practitioners (AAP), Ambulance Technicians, A&E Support Clinicians, Ambulance Nurses, Community First Responders (CFR trained to FREC level 5 or higher), Emergency Ambulance Crews (EAC), Paramedics and Ambulance Officers employed in emergency duties in the ambulance services across the United Kingdom. Full-time, part-time and voluntary service qualify. [1] For ambulance officers, at least seven of their 20 years service must have been spent on emergency duties as a clinical grade.

Support staff and Non-clinical grades, such as 999 Call takers and Dispatchers, Ambulance Care Assistants (Non-Emergency Patient Transport Service), Emergency Care Assistants (ECA), Emergency Care Support Workers (ECSW) and Emergency Vehicle Operators (EVO) do not automatically qualify, however, can be nominated by senior management for consideration, if length of service and good conduct criteria on emergency duties are met. [3]

Service prior to 1974 in an ambulance service maintained by a local authority may also be counted. [1] There is no provision for ribbon clasps to recognise further periods of service.

The bodies covered by the medal are the various ambulance services trusts in England; the ambulance services of Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man and the States of Jersey; and the Guernsey Ambulance and Rescue Service. [1]

Appearance

The medal is circular, 1.4 inches (36 mm) in diameter, and made of cupro-nickel. The obverse bears the crowned effigy of the reigning sovereign, surrounded by the royal titles, ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA F.D. The reverse depicts the insignia of the NHS ambulance services trusts or, for awards in Scotland that of the Scottish Ambulance Service, with the words FOR EXEMPLARY SERVICE above. [1]

The medal has a ring suspension, the 1.25 inches (32 mm) wide ribbon being green with white edges that are bisected by a narrow green stripe. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 John Mussell (ed). Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 252. Published by Token Publishing Ltd. Honiton, Devon.
  2. 1 2 "No. 62529". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 January 2019. p. 327.
  3. "Board of Community Health Councils | Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Ceremony". Wales.nhs.uk. 20 October 2004. Retrieved 17 June 2013.