Jersey Honorary Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

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Jersey Honorary Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
Ian Rank-Broadley effigy military medal.png
Obverse design of the medal
TypeLong service medal
Awarded for12 years service
Presented by Bailiwick of Jersey
EligibilityMembers of the Honorary Police
Clasps Bar for 9 subsequent years of service
Established1 December 2014
Total75 (2015–17). [1]
Jersey Honorary Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal ribbon.png
Ribbon of the medal
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Prison Services (Operational Duties) Long Service and Good Conduct Medal [2]
Next (lower) Merchant Navy Medal for Meritorious Service [2]

The Jersey Honorary Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is a decoration for members of the Honorary Police of the Bailiwick of Jersey. First instituted by Royal Warrant on 1 December 2014, [3] it is an official award that can be worn alongside other British medals and decorations. [2]

It is awarded for 12 years service, with a bar awarded for each subsequent period of 9 years. To qualify for the medal a member must have been: [3]

Produced by the Royal Mint, the rhodium plated cupro-nickel circular medal has the following design: [1]

The professional States of Jersey Police do not qualify, but are eligible for the Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Micic, Zeb (June 2021). "The Jersey Honorary Police Long and Meritorious Service Medal". Orders & Medals Research Society Journal. 60 (2): 109. ISSN   1474-3353.
  2. 1 2 3 "No. 62529". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 January 2019. p. 327.
  3. 1 2 "Honours and Awards". Comité des Connétables. Retrieved 16 May 2017.