African Police Medal for Meritorious Service

Last updated
African Police Medal for Meritorious Service
African Police Medal for Meritorious Service ribbon.png
Ribbon bar of the medal
TypeLong service medal
Awarded forActs of gallantry, meritorious, and long service
Presented bythe British Empire
EligibilityNon-European members of the police forces of British African colonies
StatusReplaced by the Colonial Police Medal and Colonial Police Long Service Medal
Established14 July 1915
Last awarded1948 (Southern Rhodesia - BSAP)
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Fire Brigade Long Service and Good Conduct Medal [1]
Next (lower) Royal Canadian Mounted Police Long Service Medal [1]
Related Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The African Police Medal for Meritorious Service was a medal awarded to non-European police officers in British African colonies. [2] Awarded from 1915-1938, the medal was replaced by the Colonial Police Medal and the Colonial Police Long Service Medal. [3] [4]

Contents

Appearance

The African Police Medal for Meritorious Service is circular, of silver. The obverse bears a crowned and uniformed effigy of George V surrounded by the inscription GEORGIVS V REX ET IND : IMP :. The reverse depict the Tudor Crown surmounted by a crowned lion encircled by a wreath tied at the base. Surrounding the central design is the inscription FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE IN THE POLICE • AFRICA •. [5]

The medal is suspended from a claw suspension with a ring through its ribbon. The ribbon is yellow with edges of red.

See also

Related Research Articles

Distinguished Conduct Medal

The Distinguished Conduct Medal, post-nominal letters DCM, was established in 1854 by Queen Victoria as a decoration for gallantry in the field by other ranks of the British Army. It is the oldest British award for gallantry and was a second level military decoration, ranking below the Victoria Cross, until its discontinuation in 1993 when it was replaced by the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. The medal was also awarded to non-commissioned military personnel of other Commonwealth Dominions and Colonies.

British Empire Medal British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service

The British Empire Medal (BEM) is a British and Commonwealth award for meritorious civil or military service worthy of recognition by the Crown. The current honour was created in 1922 to replace the original medal, which had been established in 1917 as part of the Order of the British Empire.

Queens Police Medal

The Queen's Police Medal (QPM) is awarded to police in the United Kingdom for gallantry or distinguished service. It was also formerly awarded within the wider British Empire, including Commonwealth countries, most of which now have their own honours systems. The medal was established on 7 July 1909 as the King's Police Medal (KPM), initially inspired by the need to recognise the gallantry of the police officers involved in the Tottenham Outrage. Renamed the King's Police and Fire Services Medal (KPFSM) in 1940, it was replaced on 19 May 1954 by the Queen's Police Medal (QPM), when a separate Queen's Fire Service Medal was also instituted.

Meritorious Service Medal (Canada)

The Meritorious Service Medal is a decoration that is, within the Canadian system of honours, one of the two Meritorious Service Decorations gifted by the Canadian monarch, through the Governor-in-Council. Created in 1991, the medal is intended to recognize individuals—both Canadian and foreign—who have carried out meritorious acts bringing benefit and honour in either of two categories: military and civilian. Award of the medal grants recipients the ability to use the post-nominal letters MSM.

Military General Service Medal

The Military General Service Medal (MGSM) was a campaign medal approved in 1847 and issued to officers and men of the British Army in 1848.

Meritorious Service Medal (United Kingdom) British military decoration

The Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) is a British medal awarded to sergeants and warrant officers of the British armed forces for long and meritorious service. From 1916 to 1928, eligibility was extended to cover both valuable services by selected other ranks irrespective of length of service, and for gallantry not in the face of the enemy.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was established in 1899 as recognition for long and meritorious service as a part-time commissioned officer in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates. It superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies in all these territories, but not in the Indian Empire.

The Hong Kong Disciplined Services Medal was a long service medal awarded to members of the Hong Kong Disciplined Services in British Hong Kong. Established by Royal Warrant 8 July 1986, the award of the medal was intended to replace the awarding of the Imperial Service Medal. This medal was replaced by both the Hong Kong Customs & Excise Long Service Medal and the Hong Kong Immigration Service Long Service Medal, for long service to members of the respective disciplined services, upon the transfer of sovereignty in 1997, however the same ribbon continues to be used for the Hong Kong Immigration Service Long Service Medal.

The Indian Police Medal (IPM) was an award of the British Raj presented to both European and Asian police personnel. Established in 1932, the award was presented for meritorious service and gallantry that was of a lesser degree than what was required for the King's Police Medal.

The Canada Medal was an honour created in 1943 as part of an attempt to establish an indigenous honours system in Canada. It was meant to serve as the highest award that could be awarded to civilians and military personnel.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (Cape of Good Hope)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to their local military forces. The Cape of Good Hope introduced this system in September 1895 and, in 1896, instituted the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal .

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (Natal) British Colonial Army medal

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to their local military forces. The Colony of Natal introduced this system in August 1895 and, in 1897, instituted the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (Natal).

Meritorious Service Medal (Cape of Good Hope)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to members of their local permanent military forces. The Cape of Good Hope introduced this system in September 1895 and, in 1896, instituted the Meritorious Service Medal .

Meritorious Service Medal (Natal)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to members of their local permanent military forces. The Colony of Natal introduced this system in August 1895 and, in 1897, instituted the Meritorious Service Medal (Natal).

Volunteer Officers Decoration for India and the Colonies UK long service medal for volunteer officers

The Volunteer Officers' Decoration was instituted in 1892 as an award for long and meritorious service by officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. In 1894, the grant of the decoration was extended to commissioned officers of Volunteer Forces throughout the British Empire. A separate new decoration was instituted, the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies, post-nominal letters VD.

John Luard (1790–1875) was a British Army officer and author of History of the Dress of the British Soldier

The Meritorious Conduct Medal was a Rhodesian military decoration for brave and gallant conduct.

The Uganda Intelligence Department (UID) was an organisation mobilised at short notice by the colonial government in the Uganda Protectorate at the start of World War 1. The National Archives 'British Army medal index cards 1914–1920 records list at least 20 people affiliated with the UID; although all those listed below may not have been serving concurrently as mobilisation dates on medal cards do vary.

Brigadier-General William Francis Howard Stafford was a British Army officer who served with the Royal Engineers in various campaigns in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Towards the end of his career, he was in command of the South Irish coastal defences.

References

  1. 1 2 "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3352.
  2. "Lot 836, 23 September 2005 | Dix Noonan Webb". Dnw.co.uk. 23 September 2005. Retrieved 29 June 2013.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. Allen, Anthony (2008). "African Police Medal for Meritorious Service 1915-38". The Journal of the Orders and Medals Research Society. 47 (1): 12–18.
  4. Mackay, James, Editor; Mussell, John W.; Editorial Team of Medal News (2004). The Medal Yearbook 2004. Devon, UK: Token Publishing Ltd. p. 206. ISBN   9781870192620.
  5. "Lot 365, 25 September 2008". Dix Noonan Webb. Retrieved 29 June 2013.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)