Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal

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Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal
Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal, obverse.png Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal, reverse.png
Obverse and reverse of the medal
TypeLong service and good conduct medal
Awarded forAwarded for 10 years service and attending 10 annual camps.
Presented bythe United Kingdom
EligibilityMembers of the Imperial Yeomanry serving on or after 9 November 1904.
Established1904
Last awarded1908
Total1,674
Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal.png
Ribbon bar
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Militia Long Service Medal [1]
Next (lower) Territorial Decoration [1]

The Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom. It is no longer awarded.

Contents

Eligibility

Authorised by King Edward VII under Army Order No. 211 of 1904, the medal was awarded to troopers and non-commissioned officers in the Imperial Yeomanry for 10 years service and attending 10 annual camps. [2] [3] Any previous full time service in the Regular Army did not count towards this medal, although service in other volunteer and auxiliary forces could be counted, provided that five years immediately preceding the award were served in the Yeomanry. [4]

In 1908, the Imperial Yeomanry along with the Volunteer Force were transferred to the newly created Territorial Force. The medal was then superseded by the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal. [5]

Awards were published in Army Orders, with a total of 1,674 medals awarded, to men in over fifty different Yeomanry regiments, [6] including 951 awards when the medal was first established. [7]

Among the recipients was the military artist Harry Payne, who served with the Queen's Own West Kent Yeomanry. [8]

Appearance

The Imperial Yeomanry Long Service and Good Conduct Medal is an oval shaped silver medal with a fixed ring suspender at the top. The obverse depicts the bust of King Edward VII in uniform facing left. Around the top edge is the legend, EDWARDVS VII REX IMPERATOR. The reverse bears the words IMPERIAL YEOMANRY FOR LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT. The medal hangs from a 32 mm light yellow ribbon threaded through the top ring suspender. [3] [9]

The medal was issued with the recipient's name, rank and unit impressed on the rim. [6]

Related Research Articles

Territorial Decoration

The Territorial Decoration (TD) was a military medal of the United Kingdom awarded for long service in the Territorial Force and its successor, the Territorial Army. This award superseded the Volunteer Officer's Decoration when the Territorial Force was formed on 1 April 1908, following the enactment of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907, which was a large reorganisation of the old Volunteer Army and the remaining units of militia and Yeomanry. However, the Militia were transferred to the Special Reserve rather than becoming part of the Territorial Force. A recipient of this award is entitled to use the letters "TD" after their name (post-nominal).

Volunteer Officers Decoration

The Volunteer Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was instituted in 1892 as an award for long and meritorious service by officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the decoration was discontinued in the United Kingdom when it was superseded by the Territorial Decoration in 1908, but it continued to be awarded in some Crown Dependencies until 1930.

Emergency Reserve Decoration

The Emergency Reserve Decoration (ERD) was a British military decoration for long service, instituted on 17 November 1952 and given for service up to 1967.

Victory Medal (United Kingdom) British service medal

The Victory Medal is a United Kingdom and British Empire First World War campaign medal.

Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

The Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, post-nominal letters VD until c. 1947 and VRD thereafter, was instituted in 1908. It could be awarded to part-time commissioned officers in the United Kingdom's Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve after twenty years of service as efficient and thoroughly capable officers. The decoration was a Naval version of the Volunteer Officers' Decoration and its successor, the Territorial Decoration.

Territorial Efficiency Medal

The Territorial Efficiency Medal (TEM) was a United Kingdom award for long service in the Territorial Army. It superseded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal when the Territorial Force became the Territorial Army in 1921. It was superseded by the Efficiency Medal in 1930.

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal

The Territorial Force Efficiency Medal was a United Kingdom award for long service in the Territorial Force between 1908 and 1921.

Efficiency Medal

The Efficiency Medal was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of efficient service on the active list of the Militia or the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom, or of the other Auxiliary Military Forces throughout the British Empire. At the same time a clasp was instituted for award to holders of the medal upon completion of further periods of six years of efficient service.

Efficiency Decoration

The Efficiency Decoration, post-nominal letters TD for recipients serving in the Territorial Army of the United Kingdom or ED for those serving in the Auxiliary Military Forces, was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time officers after twenty years of service as an efficient and thoroughly capable officer. The decoration superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration and the Territorial Decoration.

Territorial War Medal

The Territorial Force War Medal was a campaign medal awarded to members of the British Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Service who served overseas in World War I. It is the rarest of the five British Great War medals.

Efficiency Decoration (South Africa)

The Efficiency Decoration , post-nominal letters ED, was instituted in 1930 for award to efficient and thoroughly capable part-time officers in the Citizen Force of the Union of South Africa after twenty years of service. The decoration superseded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration.

Efficiency Medal (South Africa)

The Efficiency Medal was instituted in 1930 for award to part-time warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men after twelve years of efficient service on the active list of the Citizen Force of the Union of South Africa. At the same time, a clasp was instituted for award to holders of the medal upon completion of further periods of six years of efficient service. The medal superseded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was established in 1899 as recognition for long and meritorious service as a part-time commissioned officer in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates. It superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies in all these territories, but not in the Indian Empire.

Militia Long Service Medal

The Militia Long Service Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom between 1904 and 1930.

Volunteer Long Service Medal

The Volunteer Long Service Medal was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks and some officers of the United Kingdom's Volunteer Force. Award of the medal was discontinued when it was superseded by the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal in 1908.

Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (South Africa)

The Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct is a distinctive South African version of the British Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military). It was awarded to members of the Permanent Force of the Union of South Africa who had completed eighteen years of reckonable service.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was instituted by King William IV in 1830. The medal remained in use for 100 years, until it was replaced by the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) in 1930. During that time the reverse of the medal remained virtually unchanged, while the design of the obverse was altered during the reigns of Queen Victoria, King Edward VII and King George V.

Meritorious Service Medal (Cape of Good Hope)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to members of their local permanent military forces. The Cape of Good Hope introduced this system in September 1895 and, in 1896, instituted the Meritorious Service Medal .

Meritorious Service Medal (Natal)

In May 1895, Queen Victoria authorised Colonial governments to adopt various British military medals and to award them to members of their local permanent military forces. The Colony of Natal introduced this system in August 1895 and, in 1897, instituted the Meritorious Service Medal (Natal).

Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

The Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was a long service medal awarded by the United Kingdom. The medal was awarded for service in the Army Special Reserve, or a combination of service in the Special Reserve and other part-time military forces. Awarded between 1908 and 1930, the medal was only awarded 1,078 times.

References

  1. 1 2 "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3353.
  2. Seaby Coin & Medal Bulletin, Issues 593-604. B. A. Seaby. 1968. p. 423.
  3. 1 2 Dorling, H.T.; Dorling, E.E. (1918). Ribbons, Medals and Regimental Badges. G. Philip & Son. p. 68.
  4. J. M. A. Tamplin. Imperial Yeomanry LS&GC Medal. p. 8. Published by Spink & Son, London. 1978.
  5. John W. Mussell, editor. Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 238. Published Token Publishing Limited, Honiton, Devon. 2015.
  6. 1 2 D. W. Collett, editor. Medal Year Book 1981. p. 181. Published by Medals Yearbook, London E4.
  7. The 951 names appear in Army Order 27, February 1905. See The Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medal. An award for very long service indeed by Will Bennett. Orders & Medals Research Society Journal, Vol 51 No 3, page 174, September 2012.
  8. Orders & Medals Research Society Journal, Vol 33 No 3, Autumn 1994, page 263.
  9. Duckers, Peter (16 September 2013). British Military Medals: A Guide for the Collector and Family Historian Second Edition. Pen and Sword. ISBN   9781473829831 . Retrieved 24 June 2015.