Electoral district of Rozelle

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Rozelle was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, it was named after and including the Sydney suburb of Rozelle. It was created in the 1904 re-distirbution of electorates following the 1903 New South Wales referendum, which required the number of members of the Legislative Assembly to be reduced from 125 to 90. [1] It consisted of part of the abolished seat of Balmain South and part of Annandale. With the introduction of proportional representation, it was absorbed into the multi-member electorate of Balmain. It was recreated in 1927, but was abolished in 1930. [2] [3] [4]

Contents

Members for Rozelle

First incarnation (1904–1920)
MemberPartyTerm
  Sydney Law Liberal Reform 1904–1907
  James Mercer Labor 1907–1916
  Nationalist 1916–1917
  John Quirk Labor 1917–1920
Second incarnation (1927–1930)
MemberPartyTerm
  John Quirk Labor 1927–1930

Election results

Elections in the 1920s

1927

1927 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labor John Quirk 7,12653.4
Nationalist Albert Smith 4,92536.9
Independent Labor Cecil Murphy 1,1818.9
Independent Arthur Doughty1060.8
Total formal votes13,33897.9
Informal votes2832.1
Turnout 13,62186.1
Labor win(new seat)

District recreated

1920 - 1927

District abolished

Elections in the 1910s

1917

1917 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labor John Quirk 4,20462.0-4.1
Nationalist Alfred Reed2,57638.0+4.1
Total formal votes6,78099.0+0.4
Informal votes691.0-0.4
Turnout 6,84960.4-3.8
Labor hold Swing -4.1

1913

1913 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labor James Mercer 4,48666.1
Liberal Reform Alan Chavasse2,30433.9
Total formal votes6,79098.6
Informal votes991.4
Turnout 6,88964.2
Labor hold 

1910

1910 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [8]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour James Mercer 4,46062.5
Liberal Reform Tom Hoskins 2,67737.5
Total formal votes7,13798.7
Informal votes981.4
Turnout 7,23573.3
Labour hold 

1907

1907 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour James Mercer 3,47153.2+4.1
Liberal Reform Sydney Law 3,05646.8-4.1
Total formal votes6,52797.9
Informal votes1432.1
Turnout 6,67074.4
Labour gain from Liberal Reform Swing +4.1

1904

1904 New South Wales state election: Rozelle [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Reform Sydney Law 2,54250.9
Labour James Mercer 2,45049.1
Total formal votes4,99298.9
Informal votes551.1
Turnout 5,04761.8
Liberal Reform win(new seat)
Rozelle was a new seat that consisted of parts of the abolished set of Balmain South and Annandale. The member for Balmain South was Sydney Law who initially won that seat as a Labour candidate, before resigning and winning the seat as an Independent Labour candidate at the 1902 Balmain South by-election and contesting this election as an endorsed Liberal Reform candidate. The member for Annandale was William Mahony (Liberal Reform) who successfully contested that seat.

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References

  1. "1904 Redistribution". Atlas of New South Wales. NSW Land & Property Information. Archived from the original on 23 June 2015.
  2. Green, Antony. "Elections for the District of Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  3. "New South Wales Parliamentary Record 1824 – 2019" (PDF). Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  4. "Former Members". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  5. Green, Antony. "1927 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  6. Green, Antony. "1917 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  7. Green, Antony. "1913 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  8. Green, Antony. "1910 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 26 October 2019.
  9. Green, Antony. "1907 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 4 December 2019.
  10. Green, Antony. "1904 Rozelle". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 18 December 2019.