Fallsington Historic District

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Fallsington Historic District
FallsingtonPA StageCoachTavern.jpg
The Stage Coach Tavern
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LocationS of U.S. 1, E of New Tyburn Rd., Fallsington, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°8′40″N74°48′58″W / 40.14444°N 74.81611°W / 40.14444; -74.81611 Coordinates: 40°8′40″N74°48′58″W / 40.14444°N 74.81611°W / 40.14444; -74.81611
Area170 acres (69 ha)
Architectural styleLate Victorian, Colonial, Federal
NRHP reference No. 72001099 [1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJune 19, 1972
Designated PHMCJune 03, 1961 [2]

The Fallsington Historic District is a historic district in Fallsington, Pennsylvania.

Contents

The district's history spans over 300 years. While William Penn resided at nearby Pennsbury Manor, he attended Friends meeting in Fallsington. The center of the district is Meetinghouse Square, where the first meetinghouse was built in 1690. The third meetinghouse, built in 1790, is currently used as a community center, the William Penn Center. The fourth meetinghouse on the square, built in 1841, still operates as a place of worship for Quakers. [3]

Historic Falsington offers tours of the district, including the interiors of three preserved buildings: the Moon-Williamson Log House, Burges-Lippincott House, and the Stagecoach Tavern.

The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. It comprises 62 contributing buildings, one contributing site, and two contributing objects. [4]

Quaker meeting houses

The first meeting house in the district was built in 1690. Its site is marked by a bronze tablet erected in 1933. The second meeting house in the district was built in 1728. It is known as the Grambrel Roof House. After the third meeting house was built, the Gambrel Roof House was used as a school and later was converted into an apartment building with five apartments. It is three stories constructed of stone. [4]

The third meeting house was constructed in 1789 and is now used as a community center called the William Penn Center. In 1841 a fourth meeting house was built to the north of the Gambrel Roof House. This is the meeting house currently in use. [4]

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References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. "PHMC Historical Markers". Historical Marker Database. Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission. Archived from the original on December 7, 2013. Retrieved December 19, 2013.
  3. "Welcome". Fallsington Friends Meeting. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 "Historic Fallsington" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places nomination form. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved December 16, 2013.