Frank Pitts

Last updated
Frank Pitts
No. 25, 85
Position: Wide receiver
Personal information
Born: (1943-11-12) November 12, 1943 (age 77)
Atlanta, Georgia
Career information
College: Southern
NFL Draft: 1965  / Round: 16 / Pick: 213
(by the Chicago Bears)
AFL draft: 1965  / Round:  4  / Pick: 32
(by the Kansas City Chiefs) [1]
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:175
Receiving yards:2897
Touchdowns:27
Player stats at NFL.com

Frank H. Pitts (born November 12, 1943 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a former professional American football wide receiver in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). He played ten seasons for the AFL's Kansas City Chiefs (1965–1969) and then the NFL's Chiefs (1970), Cleveland Browns (1971–1973) and Oakland Raiders (1974).

Contents

Kansas City Chiefs

Pitts came to the Chiefs in 1965, the team's fourth-round draft pick. He had speed and desire, but throughout the wide receiver's first three seasons in Kansas City. he acquired a "bad hands" label. However, he worked through the problem, and when starting wide receiver Otis Taylor was injured in 1968, Pitts stepped in. He was a starter the next three seasons, and his end around reverse runs became a big part of the Chiefs' offense.

Super Bowl IV

Hank Stram told the play to Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson. "Listen, let's have a ... 9-0-8, 51 G-O reverse." As Dawson ran back to the huddle, Stram told everyone on the sidelines, "Here comes the reverse from Tight I, it could be wide open." Dawson took the snap, faked to Wendell Hayes on the left side of the line, then turned the ball to a sprinting Frank Pitts, who turned the corner and jetted down the right sideline for 20 yards. It was one of the biggest plays of the Chiefs' Super Bowl IV win over the Minnesota Vikings, and it set up Jan Stenerud's third field goal of the game.

Pitts ran the reverse again in the third quarter and picked up a critical first down. Otis Taylor scored on the next play.

In 74 games for Kansas City, Pitts caught 78 passes for 11 touchdowns and ran the ball 24 times for 238 yards and one touchdown.

Cleveland and Oakland

The Chiefs traded Pitts to the Cleveland Browns before the start of the 1971 season, where he became one of their starting wide receivers. He finished his career with the Oakland Raiders.

Personal life

Frank currently resides in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Frank is married to Diane Guidry Pitts and they have three children.

His grandson Brandon Bolden played at Ole Miss and is now a running back for the New England Patriots. [2] [3]

See also

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References

  1. "1965 AFL Draft" . Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  2. Reiss, Mike. "Football journey: Brandon Bolden". Patriots Blog. ESPN Boston. Retrieved 2012-09-22.
  3. Blog, KC Chiefs. "Around The Web: Replacing TG, Krumrie Runs, Chiefs Bloodlines In SEC". Archived from the original on 2013-01-27. Retrieved 2012-09-22.