Heywood (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Heywood
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
18851918
Number of membersone
Replaced by Heywood and Radcliffe
Created from South East Lancashire

Heywood was a county constituency in the county of Lancashire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of the United Kingdom. [1] Created by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, it was represented by one Member of Parliament. The constituency was abolished in 1918. [2]

Contents

Boundaries and History

This area had previously been represented as part of the South East Lancashire multi-seat division. The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 divided the former constituency into eight new single-member seats, one of which was designated South-East Lancashire, Heywood Division. [3]

The constituency comprised the Municipal Borough of Heywood, the cotton town of Ramsbottom, and a number of surrounding townships, namely: Ainsworth, Ashworth, Pilkington, Tottington Higher End and the rural part of the parish of Spotland. [4]

The constituency was mostly industrial but it included some agriculture. The town of Heywood was the most Liberal part of the constituency, having an engineering-based economy; Ramsbottom was more marginal politically. The countryside element of the constituency was Conservative inclined. Overall the division was Liberal 1885–1895, Liberal Unionist 1895–1904 and after a change of allegiance by the sitting MP was Liberal again from 1904 until the constituency was abolished in 1918.

The constituency adjoined Westhoughton to the west, Rossendale to the north, Middleton and Rochdale to the east as well as Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth, Bury, and another part of the Middleton constituency to the south.

The Representation of the People Act 1918 abolished this constituency. The successor seat was Heywood and Radcliffe.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Isaac Hoyle Liberal
1892 Thomas Snape Liberal
1895 George Kemp Liberal Unionist
1904 Liberal
1906 Sir Edward Holden, Bt Liberal
Jan 1910 Harold Thomas Cawley Liberal
1915 by-election Albert Illingworth Liberal
1918 constituency abolished: see Heywood and Radcliffe

Elections

Elections in the 1880s

Kenyon James Kenyon.jpg
Kenyon
General election 1885: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Hoyle 4,538 53.4
Conservative James Kenyon 3,95546.6
Majority5836.8
Turnout 8,49391.6
Registered electors 9,269
Liberal win (new seat)
Lawson Sir John Lawson, 1st Baronet, of Knavesmire Lodge.jpg
Lawson
General election 1886: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Hoyle 4,206 52.8 -0.6
Conservative John Lawson 3,76247.2+0.6
Majority4445.6-1.2
Turnout 7,96886.0-5.6
Registered electors 9,269
Liberal hold Swing -0.6

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1892: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Snape 4,366 53.8 +1.0
Liberal Unionist Sir Henry Hayes Lawrence, 2nd Baronet3,74546.2-1.0
Majority6217.6+2.0
Turnout 8,11187.7+1.7
Registered electors 9,251
Liberal hold Swing +1.0
Kemp George Kemp.jpg
Kemp
General election 1895: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist George Kemp 4,489 53.3 +7.1
Liberal Thomas Snape 3,93346.7-7.1
Majority5566.6N/A
Turnout 8,42290.2+2.5
Registered electors 9,334
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +7.1

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist George Kemp 4,657 51.2 2.1
Liberal Edward Holden 4,43148.8+2.1
Majority2262.44.2
Turnout 9,08890.7+0.5
Registered electors 10,022
Liberal Unionist hold Swing -2.1
Holden Edward Holden.jpg
Holden
General election 1906: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Edward Holden 5,351 55.8 +7.0
Liberal Unionist Mervyn Manningham-Buller 4,24544.27.0
Majority1,10611.6N/A
Turnout 9,59691.7+1.0
Registered electors 10,463
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +7.0

Elections in the 1910s

Cawley 1910 Harold Thomas Cawley MP.jpg
Cawley
General election January 1910: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Harold Thomas Cawley 5,809 55.0 -0.8
Conservative Mervyn Manningham-Buller 4,75045.0+0.8
Majority1,05910.0-1.6
Turnout 10,55993.1+1.4
Liberal hold Swing -0.8
General election December 1910: Heywood [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Harold Thomas Cawley 5,430 53.9 -1.1
Conservative Robert A L Hutchinson4,64146.1+1.1
Majority7897.8-2.2
Turnout 10,07188.8-4.3
Liberal hold Swing -1.1

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

Illingworth Albert Holden Illingworth in 1917.jpg
Illingworth
1915 Heywood by-election [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Albert Holden Illingworth Unopposed
Liberal hold

Related Research Articles

South Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

South Norfolk is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Richard Bacon, a Conservative.

Chippenham (UK Parliament constituency) UK Parliament constituency since 2010

Chippenham is a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom since 2015 by Michelle Donelan, a Conservative, who also currently serves as Minister of State for Universities. The 2010 constituency includes the towns of Bradford on Avon, Chippenham, Corsham and Melksham.

South Londonderry was a UK Parliament constituency in Ireland. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the British House of Commons from 1885 until it was abolished in 1922.

Oxford University was a university constituency electing two members to the British House of Commons, from 1603 to 1950. The last two members to represent Oxford University when it was abolished were A. P. Herbert and Arthur Salter.

London University was a university constituency electing one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, from 1868 to 1950.

Accrington (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885–1983

Accrington was a parliamentary constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 to 1983. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first-past-the-post system of election.

Isle of Ely was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, centred on the Isle of Ely in Cambridgeshire. Until its abolition in 1983, it elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Whitechapel (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885–1918

Whitechapel was a parliamentary constituency in the Whitechapel district of East London. In 1885 the seat was established as a division of the parliamentary borough of Tower Hamlets. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Oldham was a parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Oldham, England. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The constituency was created by the Great Reform Act of 1832 and was abolished for the 1950 general election when it was split into the Oldham East and Oldham West constituencies.

Birmingham Bordesley was a borough constituency in the city of Birmingham, which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Elections were held using the first-past-the-post voting system.

Middleton was a county constituency in the county of Lancashire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Created by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, it was represented by one Member of Parliament. The constituency was abolished in 1918.

Prestwich was a constituency in the county of Lancashire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Created by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, it was represented by one Member of Parliament. The constituency was abolished in 1918.

Bournemouth is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. The seat was created in 1918 and existed until it was abolished and split into two new seats in 1950. During the constituency's existence it was the most south-westerly seat in Hampshire.

East Dorset was a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was formally known as the Eastern Division of Dorset. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by one Knight of the Shire.

Croydon was a constituency in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament from 1885 to 1918. As with most in its lifetime following the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, it was a seat, that elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Finsbury East was a parliamentary constituency centred on the Finsbury district of North London, England. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post system.

Ramsey was a parliamentary constituency in Huntingdonshire, which elected one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was also known as North Huntingdonshire.

Stamford was a constituency in the county of Lincolnshire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of England to 1706 then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was represented by two Members of Parliament until 1868 when this was reduced to one.

Wandsworth was the name of a borough constituency created in 1885, abolished in 1918, covering the vast bulk of today's London Borough of Wandsworth in South London but excluding Battersea. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament.

Radcliffe-cum-Farnworth was a parliamentary constituency centred on the towns of Radcliffe and Farnworth in Lancashire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post system.

References

  1. "Parliamentary Constituencies and their registers since 1832" (PDF). British Library.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. Water-supply Paper. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1931.
  3. Schedule 7: Counties at Large, Number of Members and Names and Contents of Divisions, Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885 (C.23)
  4. F A Youngs Jr., Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol.II: Northern England, London, 1991
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, FWS Craig
  6. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser 18 May 1914

Sources