Westhoughton (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
Westhoughton
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
County Lancashire (until 1974)
Greater Manchester (from 1974)
18851983
Number of membersOne
Replaced by Bolton West
Wigan
Leigh
Chorley
Created from South East Lancashire

Westhoughton was a parliamentary constituency in Lancashire, England. Centred on the former mining and cotton town of Westhoughton, it returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom constituencies electoral area in the UK (do not use in P31; use subclasses of this instead)

In the United Kingdom (UK), each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elect one member to a parliament or assembly, with the exception of European Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly constituencies which are multi member constituencies.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Westhoughton town in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester, England

Westhoughton is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton, Greater Manchester, England. It is 4 miles (6 km) southwest of Bolton, 5 miles (8 km) east of Wigan and 13 miles (21 km) northwest of Manchester.

Contents

The constituency was created for the 1885 general election, and abolished for the 1983 general election.

1885 United Kingdom general election nationwide election to the House of Commons

The 1885 United Kingdom general election was held from 24 November to 18 December 1885. This was the first general election after an extension of the franchise and redistribution of seats. For the first time a majority of adult males could vote and most constituencies by law returned a single member to Parliament fulfilling one of the ideals of Chartism to provide direct single-member, single-electorate accountability. It saw the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, win the most seats, but not an overall majority. As the Irish Nationalists held the balance of power between them and the Conservatives who sat with an increasing number of allied Unionist MPs, this exacerbated divisions within the Liberals over Irish Home Rule and led to a Liberal split and another general election the following year.

1983 United Kingdom general election election for members of the British House of Commons

The 1983 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 9 June 1983. It gave the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of the Labour Party in 1945.

History and boundaries

Westhoughton in Lancashire, boundaries used 1974-83 Westhoughton1974Constituency.svg
Westhoughton in Lancashire, boundaries used 1974-83

1885–1918

The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 divided the existing constituency of South East Lancashire into eight single-member seats. The new seat of South-East Lancashire, Westhoughton Division comprised an area surrounding, but not including, the County Borough of Bolton. [1] It consisted of the towns of Aspull, Blackrod, Horwich, Little Lever, and Westhoughton, and the surrounding townships of Anglezarke, Bradshaw, Breightmet, Darcy Lever, Edgworth, Entwistle, Great Lever, Harwood, Heaton, Longworth, Lostock, Middle Hulton, Over Hulton, Quarlton and Rivington, plus Turton Urban District, and the parts of Rumworth, Sharples and Tonge with Haulgh outside the Parliamentary Borough of Bolton. [2] [3] [4]

Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 United Kingdom legislation

The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was a piece of electoral reform legislation that redistributed the seats in the House of Commons, introducing the concept of equally populated constituencies, a concept in the broader global context termed equal apportionment, in an attempt to equalise representation across the UK. It was associated with, but not part of, the Representation of the People Act 1884.

South East Lancashire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by two Members of Parliament. The constituency was created by the Reform act of 1867 by the splitting of the South Lancashire constituency into South-West and South-East divisions.

County Borough of Bolton

Bolton was, from 1838 to 1974, a local government district in the northwest of England, conterminate with the town of Bolton.

1918–1950

The Representation of the People Act 1918 reorganised parliamentary seats throughout Great Britain. Constituencies were redefined in terms of the urban and rural districts created by the Local Government Act 1894. Lancashire, Westhoughton Division consisted of five adjoining urban districts: Aspull, Blackrod, Hindley, Horwich and Westhoughton. [3] [5] [6]

Representation of the People Act 1918 United Kingdom legislation

The Representation of the People Act 1918 was an Act of Parliament passed to reform the electoral system in Great Britain and Ireland. It is sometimes known as the Fourth Reform Act. The Act extended the franchise in parliamentary elections, also known as the right to vote, to men aged 21 and over, whether or not they owned property, and to women aged 30 and over who resided in the constituency or occupied land or premises with a rateable value above £5, or whose husbands did. At the same time, it extended the local government franchise to include women aged 21 and over on the same terms as men.

Great Britain island in the North Atlantic off the north-west coast of continental Europe

Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world. In 2011, Great Britain had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan. The island of Ireland is situated to the west of Great Britain, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.

In England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland, an urban district was a type of local government district that covered an urbanised area. Urban districts had an elected urban district council (UDC), which shared local government responsibilities with a county council.

1950–1983

The next redrawing of English constituencies was effected by the Representation of the People Act 1948. The Act introduced the term "county constituency". Westhoughton County Constituency was enlarged by the addition of Standish with Langtree Urban District and Wigan Rural District. [3] [7] The revised boundaries were first used at the 1950 general election, and were unchanged until abolition. [8]

Representation of the People Act 1948 United Kingdom legislation

The Representation of the People Act 1948 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that altered the law relating to parliamentary and local elections. It is noteworthy for abolishing plural voting, including by the abolition of the twelve separate university constituencies; and for again increasing the number of members overall, in this case to 613.

Wigan Rural District was an administrative district in Lancashire, England from 1894 to 1974. The rural district comprised an area to the north, but did not include the town of Wigan.

1950 United Kingdom general election

The 1950 United Kingdom general election was the first general election ever to be held after a full term of Labour government. The election was held on Thursday 23 February 1950. Despite polling over 700,000 votes more than the Conservatives, and receiving more votes than they had during the 1945 general election, Labour obtained a slim majority of just five seats—a stark contrast to 1945, when they had achieved a comfortable 146-seat majority. There was a national swing towards the Conservatives, who gained 90 seats. Labour called another general election in 1951.

Abolition

The 1983 redistribution of seats reflected local government reforms made in 1974. The bulk of the seat became part of the parliamentary county of Greater Manchester: Blackrod, Horwich and Westhoughton formed part of the new Bolton West county constituency, Aspull and Standish part of Wigan borough constituency and Hindley was included in Leigh borough constituency. Some parishes in the north of the old constituency remained in Lancashire, and were included in Chorley county constituency. [9]

Local Government Act 1972 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government Act 1972 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales on 1 April 1974.

Greater Manchester County of England

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county and combined authority area in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the cities of Manchester and Salford. Greater Manchester was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, and designated a functional city region on 1 April 2011.

Bolton West (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1950 onwards

Bolton West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Chris Green of the Conservative Party.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMember [10] Party
1885 Frank Hardcastle Conservative
1892 Edward Stanley Conservative
1906 William Wilson Labour
1921 by-election Rhys Davies Labour
1951 by-election Tom Price Labour
1973 by-election Roger Stott Labour
1983 constituency abolished

Election results

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1885: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Frank Hardcastle 6,01161.6N/A
Liberal Edward Cross [12] 3,74138.4N/A
Majority2,27023.2N/A
Turnout 9,75291.8N/A
Registered electors 10,625
Conservative win (new seat)
General election 1886: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Frank Hardcastle Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1892: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Stanley 6,71157.9N/A
Liberal Lewis Haslam 4,87142.1N/A
Majority1,84015.8N/A
Turnout 11,58289.2N/A
Registered electors 12,979
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1895: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Stanley Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Stanley 7,98961.7N/A
Liberal Franklin Thomasson 4,94938.3N/A
Majority3,04023.4N/A
Turnout 12,93881.7N/A
Registered electors 15,827
Conservative hold Swing N/A
By-election, 1903: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Stanley Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1906: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Repr. Cmte. William Wilson 9,26260.2N/A
Conservative Edward Stanley 6,13439.821.9
Majority3,12820.4N/A
Turnout 15,39685.6+3.9
Registered electors 17,984
Labour Repr. Cmte. gain from Conservative Swing N/A

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Wilson 10,14156.83.4
Conservative H. M. Byrne7,70943.2+3.4
Majority2,43213.66.8
Turnout 17,85090.4+4.8
Registered electors 19,751
Labour hold Swing 3.4
General election December 1910: Westhoughton [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Wilson 9,06453.23.6
Conservative G. F. Clarke7,97446.8+3.6
Majority1,0906.47.2
Turnout 17,03886.34.1
Registered electors 19,751
Labour hold Swing 3.6
General election 1918: Westhoughton [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Wilson 11,84963.9+10.7
Independent Liberal James Tonge6,69736.1N/A
Majority5,15227.8+21.4
Turnout 18,54661.624.7
Registered electors 30,108
Labour hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1920s

1921 Westhoughton by-election [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 14,87657.86.1
Liberal
  • James Tonge
10,86742.2+6.1
Majority4,00915.612.2
Turnout 25,74384.7+23.1
Registered electors 30,409
Labour hold Swing 6.1
General election 1922: Westhoughton [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 14,84655.48.5
National Liberal James Tonge11,93744.6+8.5
Majority2,90910.817.0
Turnout 26,78385.4+23.8
Registered electors 31,351
Labour hold Swing 8.5
General election 1923: Westhoughton [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 15,34760.3+4.9
Unionist John Haslam 10,10339.7N/A
Majority5,24420.6+9.8
Turnout 25,45079.36.1
Registered electors 32,081
Labour hold Swing +4.9
General election 1924: Westhoughton [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 16,03355.84.5
Unionist John Haslam 12,68444.2+4.5
Majority3,34911.69.0
Turnout 28,71788.8+8.8
Registered electors 32,587
Labour hold Swing 4.5
General election 1929: Westhoughton [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 22,30561.5+5.6
Unionist James Wain Lomax9,85527.217.0
Liberal Ernest Everett Canney4,13211.4N/A
Majority12,45034.3+22.6
Turnout 36,29287.11.0
Registered electors 41,648
Labour hold Swing +11.3

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: Westhoughton [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 19,30153.46
Conservative P. Higson16,80146.54
Majority2,5006.92
Turnout 85.49
Labour hold Swing
General election 1935: Westhoughton [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 21,09360.36
Conservative H. O. Dixon13,85139.64
Majority7,24220.72
Turnout 83.24
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Westhoughton [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 20,99064.91
Conservative Stanley Bell11,34635.09
Majority9,64429.82
Turnout 77.44
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1950: Westhougton [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Rhys Davies 30,11762.26
Conservative F. Joan Crowther18,25937.74
Majority11,85824.51
Turnout 88.30
Labour hold Swing
1951 Westhoughton by-election [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 25,36860.4-1.8
Conservative Frank J. Land16,61439.6+1.8
Majority8,75420.8-3.7
Turnout 41,982
Labour hold Swing
General election 1951: Westhoughton [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 29,31961.13
Conservative Frank J. Land18,64438.87
Majority10,67522.26
Turnout 86.6
Labour hold Swing
General election 1955: Westhoughton [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 27,90060.99
Conservative Eric Dunnett17,84839.01
Majority10,05221.97
Turnout 82.95
Labour hold Swing
General election 1959: Westhoughton [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 29,35961.17
Conservative John E. Gouldbourn18,63438.83
Majority10,72522.35
Turnout 84.28
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1964: Westhoughton [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 30,24961.75
Conservative John I. Hanrahan18,73838.25
Majority11,51123.50
Turnout 81.92
Labour hold Swing
General election 1966: Westhoughton [24]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 31,38764.96
Conservative John I. Hanrahan16,92735.04
Majority14,46029.93
Turnout 78.75
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1970: Westhoughton [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Tom Price 29,67455.4
Conservative Cyril A. Unsworth23,84744.6
Majority5,82710.9
Turnout 53,52176.9
Labour hold Swing
1973 Westhoughton by-election [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Roger Stott 26,29457.0+1.6
Conservative Cyril A. Unsworth19,51142.3-2.3
Democratic SocialistBrian O'Hara3350.7+0.7
Majority6,78314.7+3.8
Turnout 46,140
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: Westhoughton [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Roger Stott 30,57451.5
Conservative Brian H. Tetlow17,90930.1
Liberal R. S. Hale10,93918.4
Majority12,66521.3
Turnout 59,42283.2
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: Westhoughton [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Roger Stott 30,37354.1
Conservative Brian H. Tetlow16,79829.9
Liberal R. S. Hale8,92615.9
Majority13,57524.2
Turnout 56,09777.9
Labour hold Swing
General election 1979: Westhoughton [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Roger Stott 29,68548.2
Conservative Carolyn Johnson24,39839.6
Liberal J. Pigott7,54412.2
Majority5,2878.6
Turnout 61,62780.1
Labour hold Swing

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References

  1. Boundary Commissioners for England and Wales (1885). "South East Lancashire, New Divisions of County (Map)". Report of the Boundary Commissioners for England and Wales. londonancestor.com. Retrieved 2008-09-28.
  2. Seventh Schedule, Counties At Large, Number Of Members And Names And Contents Of Divisions, Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 (C.23)
  3. 1 2 3 F A Youngs Jr., Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol.II: Northern England, London 1991
  4. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Boundary Map of South East Lancashire Westhoughton PDivCon". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  5. Ninth Schedule: Redistribution of Seats, Representation of the People Act 1918 (C.5)
  6. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Boundary Map of Lancashire Westhoughton PDivCon". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  7. First Schedule, Parliamentary Constituencies, Representation of the People Act 1948 (C.65)
  8. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Boundary Map of Westhoughton CCon". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  9. The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1983 (S.I. 1983 No.417)
  10. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 2)
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.
  12. "The General Election" . Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser . 20 November 1885. pp. 5–6. Retrieved 14 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  14. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1922
  15. General Election, 27 October 1931: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  16. General Election, 14 November 1935: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  17. General Election, 5 July 1945: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  18. General Election, 23 February 1950: Westhougton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  19. By-election 1951: Westhoughton. British Election Ephemera Archive. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  20. General Election 25 October 1951: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  21. General Election, 26 May 1955: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  22. General Election, 8 October 1959: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  23. General Election, 15 October 1964: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  24. General Election, 31 March 1966: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  25. General Election, 18 June 1970: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  26. By-election 1960: Westhoughton. British Election Ephemera Archive. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  27. General Election, 28 February 1974: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  28. General Election, 10 October 1974: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.
  29. General Election, 3 May 1979: Westhoughton. Political Science Resources. Retrieved 14 May 2010.

Coordinates: 53°36′N2°38′W / 53.60°N 2.64°W / 53.60; -2.64