Bolton (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Bolton
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
18321950
Number of memberstwo
Replaced by Bolton East and Bolton West
Created from Lancashire

Bolton was a borough constituency centred on the town of Bolton in the county of Lancashire. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons for the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the bloc vote system.

Contents

Created by the Reform Act of 1832, it was represented by two Members of Parliament. The constituency was abolished in 1950, being split into single-member divisions of Bolton East and Bolton West.

Members of Parliament

Election1st member1st party2nd member2nd party
1832 Robert Torrens Whig [1] [2] William Bolling Tory [1] [3]
1834 Conservative [1] [3]
1835 Peter Ainsworth Whig [4] [5] [1]
1837
1841 John Bowring Radical [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [1]
1847 William Bolling Conservative [12] [13] [14]
1848 Stephen Blair Conservative [15] [16]
1849 Sir Joshua Walmsley Radicals [17] [18] [19]
1852 Thomas Barnes Radical [20] [21] Joseph Crook Radical [22] [23]
1857 William Gray Conservative
1859 Liberal
1861 Thomas Barnes Liberal
1865
1868 John Hick Conservative
1874 John Kynaston Cross Liberal
1880 John Pennington Thomasson Liberal
1885 Herbert Shepherd-Cross Unionist Francis Bridgeman Unionist
1886
1892
1895 Conservative George Harwood Liberal
1900
1906 Alfred Henry Gill Labour
Jan 1910
Dec 1910
1912 Thomas Taylor Liberal
1914 Robert Tootill Labour
1916 William Edge Liberal
1918 Coalition Liberal
1922 William Russell Conservative National Liberal
1923 Sir Herbert Cunliffe Conservative Albert Law Labour
1924 Cecil Hilton Unionist
1929 Michael Brothers Labour Albert Law Labour
1931 Sir John Haslam Conservative Sir Cyril Entwistle Conservative
1935
1940 Sir Edward Cadogan Conservative
1945 John Henry Jones Labour John Lewis Labour
1950 constituency abolished: see Bolton East & Bolton West

Boundaries

1832–1885: The township of Great Bolton, Little Bolton, and Haulgh, except the detached part of the township of Little Bolton which was situate to the north of the town of Bolton. [24]

1885–1918: The existing parliamentary borough, and so much of the municipal borough of Bolton as was not already included in the parliamentary borough. [25]

Elections

1840s1850s1860s1870s1880s1890s1900s1910s1920s1930s1940sReferences

Winning candidates are highlighted in bold.

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1832: Bolton (2 seats) [26] [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Robert Torrens 627 36.7
Tory William Bolling 492 28.8
Whig John Ashton Yates 48228.2
Radical William Eagle1076.3
Turnout 93589.9
Registered electors 1,040
Majority1357.9
Whig win (new seat)
Majority100.6
Tory win (new seat)
General election 1835: Bolton (2 seats) [26] [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Bolling 633 40.4 +11.6
Whig Peter Ainsworth 590 37.7 +9.5
Whig Robert Torrens 34321.914.8
Majority432.7+2.1
Turnout 92792.6+2.7
Registered electors 1,001
Conservative hold Swing +7.1
Whig hold Swing +6.2
General election 1837: Bolton (2 seats) [26] [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Peter Ainsworth 615 34.9 2.8
Conservative William Bolling 607 34.5 5.9
Whig Andrew Knowles53830.6+8.7
Turnout 1,07980.512.1
Registered electors 1,340
Majority80.4N/A
Whig hold Swing +0.1
Majority693.9+1.2
Conservative hold Swing 5.9

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1841: Bolton (2 seats) [26] [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Peter Ainsworth 669 29.6 35.9
Radical John Bowring 614 27.2 N/A
Conservative Peter Rothwell [27] 53623.7+6.5
Conservative William Bolling 44119.5+2.3
Turnout 1,16479.11.4
Registered electors 1,471
Majority552.4+2.0
Whig hold Swing 19.7
Majority783.5N/A
Radical gain from Conservative Swing N/A
General election 1847: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Bolling 714 35.5 7.7
Radical John Bowring 652 32.4 +5.2
Radical John Brooks [28] 64532.1N/A
Majority623.1N/A
Turnout 1,363 (est)92.1 (est)+13.0
Registered electors 1,479
Conservative gain from Whig Swing 6.5
Radical hold Swing +4.5

Bolling's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 12 September 1848: Bolton [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Stephen Blair Unopposed
Conservative hold

Bowring resigned after being appointed Consul-General at Canton, China, causing a by-election.

By-election, 9 February 1849: Bolton [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Radical Joshua Walmsley 621 52.2 12.3
Conservative Thomas Ridgway Bridson [29] 56847.8+12.3
Majority534.4N/A
Turnout 1,18982.79.4
Registered electors 1,437
Radical hold Swing 12.3

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Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Radical Thomas Barnes 745 29.4 3.0
Radical Joseph Crook 727 28.7 3.4
Conservative Stephen Blair 71728.37.2
Whig Peter Ainsworth [30] 34613.6N/A
Majority100.4N/A
Turnout 1,268 (est)75.9 (est)16.2
Registered electors 1,671
Radical hold Swing +0.3
Radical gain from Conservative Swing +0.1
General election 1857: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Gray 930 35.0 +6.7
Radical Joseph Crook 895 33.7 +5.0
Radical Thomas Barnes 83231.3+1.9
Majority351.3N/A
Turnout 1,794 (est)92.8 (est)+16.9
Registered electors 1,933
Conservative gain from Radical Swing +1.6
Radical hold Swing +0.8
General election 1859: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Gray Unopposed
Liberal Joseph Crook Unopposed
Registered electors 2,050
Conservative hold
Liberal hold

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Elections in the 1860s

Crook's resignation caused a by-election.

By-election, 11 Feb 1861: Bolton (1 seat) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Barnes Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1865: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Gray 1,022 28.5 N/A
Liberal Thomas Barnes 979 27.3 N/A
Liberal Samuel Pope [31] 86424.1N/A
Liberal-ConservativeWilliam Gibb [32] 72720.2New
Turnout 1,796 (est)82.2 (est)N/A
Registered electors 2,186
Majority431.2N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Majority2527.1N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1868: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Hick 6,062 26.6 +12.3
Conservative William Gray 5,848 25.7 +11.4
Liberal Thomas Barnes 5,45123.93.4
Liberal Samuel Pope [31] 5,43623.80.3
Majority3971.8+0.6
Turnout 11,399 (est)90.1 (est)+7.9
Registered electors 12,650
Conservative hold Swing +6.3
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +7.4

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Elections in the 1870s

General election 1874: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Hick 5,987 26.2 0.4
Liberal John Kynaston Cross 5,782 25.3 +1.4
Conservative William Gray 5,65024.71.0
Liberal James Knowles [33] 5,44023.80.0
Turnout 11,430 (est)90.7 (est)+0.6
Registered electors 12,595
Majority2050.90.9
Conservative hold Swing 0.2
Majority1320.6N/A
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.2

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Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Bolton (2 seats) [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Kynaston Cross 6,964 26.2 +0.9
Liberal John Pennington Thomasson 6,673 25.1 +1.3
Conservative Thomas Lever Rushton [34] 6,54024.61.6
Conservative Francis Bridgeman 6,41524.10.6
Majority1330.50.1
Turnout 13,296 (est)95.3 (est)+4.6
Registered electors 13,956
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.3
Liberal hold Swing +1.0
Cross J-k-cross-1880.jpg
Cross
Thomasson J-P-Thomasson-1880.jpg
Thomasson
General election 1885: Bolton (2 seats) [35] [36] [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Herbert Shepherd-Cross 7,933 26.6 +2.0
Conservative Francis Bridgeman 7,655 25.8 +1.7
Liberal John Kynaston Cross 6,72522.63.6
Liberal John Pennington Thomasson 6,22821.04.1
Ind. Conservative Henry Marriott Richardson1,1914.0New
Majority9303.2N/A
Turnout 15,06993.81.5 (est)
Registered electors 16,063
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +2.8
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +2.9
General election 1886: Bolton (2 seats) [35] [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Herbert Shepherd-Cross 7,780 27.5 +0.9
Conservative Francis Bridgeman 7,668 27.2 +1.4
Liberal Joseph Crook Haslam6,45222.9+0.3
Liberal Roger Charnock Richards6,31422.4+1.4
Majority1,2164.3+1.1
Turnout 14,16788.2-5.6
Registered electors 16,063
Conservative hold Swing +0.3
Conservative hold Swing +0.0

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Elections in the 1890s

Shepherd-Cross Herbert Shepherd-Cross.jpg
Shepherd-Cross
General election 1892: Bolton (2 seats) [35] [38] [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Herbert Shepherd-Cross 8,429 26.6 -0.9
Conservative Francis Bridgeman 8,140 25.7 -1.5
Liberal Frank Taylor7,57523.9+1.0
Liberal John Harwood7,53623.8+1.4
Majority5651.8-2.5
Turnout 31,68089.6+1.4
Registered electors 17,772
Conservative hold Swing -1.0
Conservative hold Swing -1.3
Harwood George Harwood.jpg
Harwood
General election 1895: Bolton (2 seats) [35] [36] [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Herbert Shepherd-Cross 8,594 31.0 +4.4
Liberal George Harwood 8,453 30.6 +6.7
Conservative Francis Bridgeman 7,90128.6+2.9
Ind. Labour Party Frederick Brocklehurst 2,6949.8N/A
Turnout 27,64292.1+2.5
Registered electors 18,183
Majority5,90021.2+19.4
Conservative hold Swing 1.2
Majority5522.0N/A
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.9

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Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Bolton (2 seats) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Herbert Shepherd-Cross Unopposed
Liberal George Harwood Unopposed
Conservative hold
Liberal hold
Goschen George Goschen the younger.jpg
Goschen
General election 1906: Bolton (2 seats) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Harwood 10,953 39.0 N/A
Labour Repr. Cmte. Alfred Henry Gill 10,416 37.1 New
Conservative George Goschen 6,69323.9N/A
Majority3,72313.2N/A
Turnout 28,06291.5N/A
Registered electors 20,388
Liberal hold
Labour Repr. Cmte. gain from Conservative
Gill Alfred Gill.JPG
Gill

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Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Bolton (2 seats) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Harwood 12,275 31.5 7.5
Labour Alfred Henry Gill 11,864 30.5 6.6
Conservative Miles Walker Mattinson 7,47919.24.7
Conservative Percy Ashworth7,32618.8N/A
Turnout 38,94493.8+2.3
Registered electors 21,341
Majority4,79612.32.8
Liberal hold Swing 0.5
Majority4,38511.31.9
Labour hold Swing 1.0
General election December 1910: Bolton (2 seats) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal George Harwood 10,358 35.5 +4.0
Labour Alfred Henry Gill 10,108 34.7 +4.2
Conservative George Hesketh (soldier)8,69729.88.2
Turnout 29,16389.34.5
Registered electors 21,341
Majority1,6615.76.6
Liberal hold Swing +6.1
Majority1,4114.96.4
Labour hold Swing +6.2

Harwood's death causes a by-election.

1912 Bolton by-election (1 seat) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Taylor 10,011 53.1 +17.6
Unionist Arthur Brooks8,83546.9+17.1
Majority1,1766.2N/A
Turnout 18,84688.9-0.4
Registered electors 21,195
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Gill's death caused a by-election.

1914 Bolton by-election (1 seat) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Robert Tootill Unopposed
Labour hold

Taylor's resignation causes a by-election.

1916 Bolton by-election (1 seat) [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal William Edge Unopposed
Liberal hold

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1918: Bolton (2 seats) [41] [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Liberal William Edge Unopposed
Labour Robert Tootill Unopposed
Liberal hold
Labour hold
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

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Elections in the 1920s

General election 1922: Bolton (2 seats) [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist William Russell 37,491 29.3 New
National Liberal William Edge 31,015 24.3 N/A
Labour Samuel Lomax 20,55916.1N/A
Labour William James Abraham 20,15615.8N/A
Liberal Isaac Edwards18,53414.5N/A
Turnout 127,75575.7N/A
Registered electors 84,342
Majority16,93213.2n/a
Unionist gain from Labour Swing N/A
Majority10,4568.2N/A
National Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1923: Bolton (2 seats) [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Albert Law 25,133 18.6 +2.5
Unionist Herbert Cunliffe 22,833 16.9 12.4
Unionist Cecil Hilton 22,64016.8N/A
Liberal William Edge 22,17316.57.8
Labour Fleming Eccles 21,04515.60.2
Liberal John Fletcher Steele21,04015.6+1.1
Turnout 134,86478.8+3.1
Registered electors 85,613
Majority2,4931.8N/A
Labour gain from Liberal Swing +5.2
Majority6600.412.8
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1924: Bolton (2 seats) [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Herbert Cunliffe 34,690 23.7 +6.8
Unionist Cecil Hilton 33,405 22.8 +6.0
Labour Albert Law 30,63220.9+2.3
Labour William Harold Hutchinson 28,91819.8+4.2
Liberal J. Percy Taylor10,0366.99.6
Liberal Alfred Ernest Holt8,5585.99.7
Turnout 146,23984.7+5.9
Registered electors 86,366
Majority2,7731.9+1.5
Unionist gain from Labour Swing +2.3
Unionist hold Swing +1.9
Entwistle Cyril Entwistle.jpg
Entwistle
General election 1929: Bolton (2 seats) [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Albert Law 43,520 24.0 +3.1
Labour Michael Brothers 37,888 20.9 +1.1
Unionist Cyril Entwistle 36,66720.33.4
Unionist Cecil Hilton 35,85019.83.0
Liberal Patrick Redmond Barry 27,07415.0+2.2
Turnout 180,99975.19.6
Registered electors 120,463
Majority1,2210.6N/A
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +3.3
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +2.1

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Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: Bolton (2 seats) [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Cyril Entwistle 66,385 33.94
Conservative John Haslam 63,402 32.42
Labour Albert Law 33,73617.25
Labour Michael Brothers 32,04916.39
Turnout 195,57279.56
Majority29,66615.17N/A
Conservative gain from Labour Swing
Majority32,64917.69N/A
Conservative gain from Labour Swing
General election 1935: Bolton (2 seats) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Cyril Entwistle 54,129 29.05
Conservative John Haslam 52,465 28.15
Labour Albert Law 39,89021.41
Labour John Lynch39,87121.40
Turnout 186,35575.07
Majority12,5756.64
Conservative hold Swing
Majority14,2397.64
Conservative hold Swing

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Elections in the 1940s

General Election 1939–40:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

However, in the by-election held in 1940 no other parties contested the seat due to the War-time electoral pact meaning that the Conservative candidate Edward Cadogan was elected unopposed.

General election 1945: Bolton (2 seats) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Jack Jones 44,595 23.99
Labour John Lewis 43,266 23.28
Conservative Sir John Reynolds, 2nd Baronet31,21716.79
Conservative Cyril Entwistle 30,91116.63
Liberal Robert Kewley Spedding18,1809.78New
Liberal Brian Reginald Connell17,7109.53New
Turnout 185,87977.2
Majority13,3787.20N/A
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
Majority12,0496.49N/A
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

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