Jamaica women's national football team

Last updated

Jamaica
Nickname(s) Reggae Girlz
Association Jamaica Football Federation
Head coach Hue Menzies [1]
Top scorer Khadija Shaw (40)
FIFA code JAM
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First colours
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 51 Steady2.svg(27 September 2019) [2]
Highest51 (July 2019)
Lowest128 (November 2010)
First international
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 1–0 Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg
(Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 17 April 1991)
Biggest win
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 14–0 Saint Lucia  Flag of Saint Lucia.svg
(San Cristóbal, Dominican Republic; 20 June 2014)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 11–1 Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg
(Brazil; 18 July 2007)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10–0 Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg
(Canada; 19 August 1994)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2019 )
Best resultGroup stage (2019)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances6 (first in 2002 )
Best result3rd place (2018)

Jamaica women's national football team, nicknamed the "Reggae Girlz", is one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Trinidad and Tobago and Haiti. In 2008, the team was disbanded after it failed to get out of the group stage of Olympic Qualifying, which notably featured the United States and Mexico. The program was restarted in 2014 after a nearly six-year hiatus, finishing second at the 2014 Women's Caribbean Cup after losing 1–0 against Trinidad and Tobago in the final. The team is backed by ambassador Cedella Marley, the daughter of the late Bob Marley; she helps raise awareness for the team, encourages development, and provides for it financially. [3] Jamaica qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, but the team was eliminated after losing all its matches in the group stage.

The Trinidad & Tobago women's national football team is commonly known in their country as the "Soca Princesses", but they prefer to be called the Women Soca Warriors. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Jamaica and Haiti. Trinidad & Tobago women's national football team is currently coached by Richard Hood, who replaced Randy Waldrum in 2016.

The Haiti women's national football team participates in several competitions including the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. The team also participates in qualification for the FIFA Women's World Cup and Summer Olympics, although they have yet to succeed in qualifying for either tournament. The team is controlled by the Fédération Haïtienne de Football. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago. Haiti women's national football team is currently coached by Shek Borkowski who is also the coach of the under 17 and under 20 teams.

United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic gold medals, and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups. It medaled in every World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF. The United States women's national soccer team recently just won the 2019 World Cup for the 4th time by defeating Netherlands 2-0.

Contents

History

Founding

Women's football in Jamaica started with the founding of the Jamaican Women's Football association (founded by Andrea Lewis its first president) in 1987. [4]

Andrea Desiree Lewis is a Canadian actress and singer, best known for her portrayal of Hazel Aden in the long-running TV series Degrassi: The Next Generation.

1990s

On 17 April 1991 the team competed in its first international match against Haiti, which they lost 1–0. [5] In August 1994, the Reggae Girlz were defeated 10–0 by the United States. [5]

2000s

In 2002, the Reggae Girlz qualified for the 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup (the qualifying tournament for the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, but lost all of their preliminary round games. In 2006, the team qualified for the Women’s Gold Cup again and finished in fourth place. [5]

The 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was the second staging of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. It was held in Seattle, Washington, United States and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial championship of women's association football teams organized by FIFA. It was held in the United States from 20 September to 12 October 2003 at six venues in six cities across the country. The tournament was won by Germany, who became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup.

2010s

In 2010, due to lack of funding, the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) cut the senior women’s program as well as the women’s Olympic program. Subsequently, the team was unable to participate in the qualifiers for the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup. [6] In 2011, due to over three years of inactivity, Jamaica was not ranked in the FIFA Women's World Rankings. [7]

The FIFA Women's World Rankings for football were introduced in 2003, with the first rankings published in March of that year, as a follow-on to the existing Men's FIFA World Rankings. They attempt to compare the strength of internationally active women's national teams at any given time.

In April 2014, Cedella Marley was named the team’s official ambassador and helped the team with their fundraising efforts. [8] On 24 June 2014, the team launched the fundraising campaign "Strike Hard for the Reggae Girlz!" [9] to raise $50,000 to pay for practices, travel expenses, housing, nutrition, and equipment in preparation for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship where they hoped to secure a spot at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. [10]

Cedella Marley is a Jamaican singer, dancer, fashion designer, actress, and entrepreneur. She is the daughter of reggae singers Bob Marley and Rita Marley and the mother of Skip Marley.

2014 CONCACAF Womens Championship

The 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship, the ninth edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship/Gold Cup/Women's World Cup qualifying tournament, was a women's football tournament that took place in the United States between 15 and 26 October 2014. It served as CONCACAF's qualifier to the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The top three teams qualified directly. The fourth placed team advanced to a play-off against the third placed team of the 2014 Copa América Femenina.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

In July 2014, it was announced that Jamaica was looking for players with Jamaican heritage in countries as far as the United Kingdom in order to improve their squad for the 2014 Women Caribbean Cup in Trinidad and Tobago. [11] The team again went unranked by FIFA in June 2017. [12]

In May 2018, Jamaica began the first round of Caribbean Zone qualifying, this was the first time the team had assembled in two years. [13] Jamaica won their group and advanced to the final round of Caribbean Zone qualifying. They hosted the final round tournament and won all four games securing their spot at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. [14] The same year, Jamaica competed in the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games. In the group stage, they had a record of one win and two losses, but did not advance to the knockout round. [14] At the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship, Jamaica was drawn into Group B alongside Canada, Costa Rica and Cuba. In their first match against Canada, they played well but lost 2–0. Jamaica secured an upset 1–0 victory over Costa Rica in their second match, thanks in part to the great play of goalkeeper Sydney Schneider. [15] In their final group match against Cuba, Jamaica won 9–0. As a result of Costa Rica losing their final group match, Jamaica finished second in their group and advanced to the semi-finals where they would face the number one ranked United States. [16] The US defeated Jamaica 6–0, in the semi-final. Jamaica won the third place match against Panama on penalty kicks, securing a spot at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Jamaica is the first Caribbean nation to ever qualify for a Women's World Cup and became the first Caribbean country to have both men's and women's teams to participate in men's and women's World Cup. [17] Interestingly, its male counterparts also qualified to the only FIFA World Cup also in France.

Jamaica placed in Group C with Italy, Australia and Brazil, and was considered as a dark horse, being rated the lowest in the group. Eventually, they finished last in the group after losing all matches but scored a lone goal by Havana Solaun.

World Cup record

World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Enter
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Did Not Enter
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Did Not Qualify
Flag of France.svg 2019 Group stage3003112-11
Total1/83003112-11
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
YearRoundDateOpponentResultStadium
Flag of France.svg 2019 Group stage9 JuneFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil L 0–3 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
14 JuneFlag of Italy.svg  Italy L 0–5 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims
18 JuneFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia L 1–4 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble

CONCACAF Women's Championship & Gold Cup record

Women's Gold Cup
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of Haiti.svg 1991 Group Stage3003112−11
Flag of the United States.svg 1993 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1994 Fifth Place3003222−20
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1998 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2000 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of the United States.svg 2002 Group Stage3003113−12
Flag of the United States.svg 2006 Fourth Place310227−5
Flag of Mexico.svg 2010 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2014 Group Stage310285+3
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 Third Place52121210+2
Total6/102041152669−43
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Match Schedule

2018

2019

Players

Up-to-date caps, goals, and statistics are not publicly available; therefore, caps and goals listed may be incorrect.

Current squad

The following 18 players were named to the roster for the 2020 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship qualification. [18]

Caps and goals are updated as of 8 October 2019 after the match against the Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  U.S. Virgin Islands.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Ricquelle Farquharson (1998-11-12) 12 November 1998 (age 20)20 Flag of the United States.svg South Florida Bulls
131 GK Chris-Ann Chambers (1995-10-24) 24 October 1995 (age 23)40Unattached
1 GK Milan Dewkinandan 2000 (age 1819)00 Flag of the United States.svg Grambling State Tigers

42 DF Chantelle Swaby (1998-08-06) 6 August 1998 (age 21)160 Flag of the United States.svg Rutgers Scarlet Knights
52 DF Konya Plummer (captain) (1997-08-02) 2 August 1997 (age 22)191 Flag of the United States.svg UCF Knights
122 DF Sashana Campbell (1991-03-02) 2 March 1991 (age 28)323Unattached
142 DF Deneisha Blackwood (1997-03-07) 7 March 1997 (age 22)237 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Praha
162 DF Dominique Bond-Flasza (1996-09-11) 11 September 1996 (age 23)214 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV
172 DF Allyson Swaby (1996-10-03) 3 October 1996 (age 23)170 Flag of Italy.svg Roma

63 MF Havana Solaun (1993-02-23) 23 February 1993 (age 26)61 Flag of Norway.svg Klepp
73 MF Chinyelu Asher (1993-05-20) 20 May 1993 (age 26)246 Flag of Norway.svg Stabæk
93 MF Tarania Clarke (1999-10-03) 3 October 1999 (age 20)32 Flag of Jamaica.svg Waterhouse
103 MF Shantel Bailey (1995-04-30) 30 April 1995 (age 24)30Unattached
193 MF Reilly Paterson 22 August21 Flag of the United States.svg Notre Dame de Namur Argonauts

24 FW Tiernny Wiltshire (1998-05-08) 8 May 1998 (age 21)30 Flag of the United States.svg Rutgers Scarlet Knights
84 FW Rena Gordon 10 Flag of Jamaica.svg Cavalier
114 FW Khadija Shaw (1997-01-31) 31 January 1997 (age 22)2740 Flag of France.svg Bordeaux
154 FW Tiffany Cameron (1991-10-16) 16 October 1991 (age 27)83 Flag of Norway.svg Stabæk
184 FW Trudi Carter (1994-11-18) 18 November 1994 (age 24)179Unattached
204 FW Cheyna Matthews (1993-11-10) 10 November 1993 (age 25)88 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Spirit
4 FW Jody Brown (2002-04-16) 16 April 2002 (age 17)188 Flag of the United States.svg Montverde Academy

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up in the past 12 months.

This list may be incomplete.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Sydney Schneider (1999-08-31) 31 August 1999 (age 20)150 Flag of the United States.svg UNC Wilmington Seahawks 2019 Pan American Games
GK Yazmeen Jamieson (1998-03-17) 17 March 1998 (age 21)30 Flag of New Zealand.svg Papakura City FC 2019 Pan American Games
GK Nicole McClure (1989-11-16) 16 November 1989 (age 29)190 Ulster Banner.svg Sion Swifts WFC 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
GK Teleisha Campbell (1986-07-06) 6 July 1986 (age 33) Flag of Jamaica.svg Arnett Gardens v. Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest, 28 October 2018

DF Toriana Patterson (1994-02-02) 2 February 1994 (age 25)140 Flag of Italy.svg Pink Sport Time 2019 Pan American Games
DF Jayda Hylton-Pelaia (1998-05-30) 30 May 1998 (age 21)40 Flag of the United States.svg East Carolina Pirates 2019 Pan American Games
DF Madiya Harriott (1999-02-16) 16 February 1999 (age 20)30 Flag of the United States.svg Vanderbilt Commodores 2019 Pan American Games
DF Rachelle Smith (1996-09-18) 18 September 1996 (age 23)10Unattached 2019 Pan American Games
DF Christina Chang (1985-06-13) 13 June 1985 (age 34)72 Flag of the United States.svg FC Surge v. Flag of Panama.svg  Panama, 19 May 2019
DF Brittany Simpson (1997-03-26) 26 March 1997 (age 22) Flag of the United States.svg Yale Bulldogs v. Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa, 7 April 2019
DF Cachet Lue (1997-03-26) 26 March 1997 (age 22)10 Flag of the United States.svg Minnesota Golden Gophers v. Flag of Chile.svg  Chile, 3 March 2019
DF Siobhan Wilson (1994-05-17) 17 May 1994 (age 25)00 Flag of Italy.svg Sassuolo Training camp, January 2019
DF Victoria Huxtable00 Flag of the United States.svg Richmond Spiders Training camp, January 2019
DF Vyan Sampson (1996-07-02) 2 July 1996 (age 23)00 Flag of England.svg West Ham United Training camp, January 2019
DF Erin Mikalsen (1999-06-21) 21 June 1999 (age 20)10 Flag of the United States.svg East Carolina Pirates v. Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest, 28 October 2018

MF Lauren Silver (1993-03-22) 22 March 1993 (age 26)201 Flag of Norway.svg Trondheims-Ørn 2019 Pan American Games
MF Jadyn Matthews (1999-11-16) 16 November 1999 (age 19)80 Flag of the United States.svg Cornell Big Red 2019 Pan American Games
MF Chanel Hudson-Marks (1997-09-14) 14 September 1997 (age 22)71Unattached 2019 Pan American Games
MF Chyanne Dennis (1999-04-09) 9 April 1999 (age 20)60 Flag of the United States.svg South Florida Bulls 2019 Pan American Games
MF Marlo Sweatman (1994-12-01) 1 December 1994 (age 24)154 Flag of Hungary.svg Szent Mihály 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
MF Ashleigh Shim (1993-11-11) 11 November 1993 (age 25)141Unattached 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
MF Laura Jackson (1991-01-17) 17 January 1991 (age 28)30Unattachedv. Flag of Panama.svg  Panama, 19 May 2019
MF Giselle Washington (2001-04-03) 3 April 2001 (age 18)122 Flag of the United States.svg Concorde Fire SC v. Flag of Chile.svg  Chile, 3 March 2019
MF Shanise Foster (1993-09-03) 3 September 1993 (age 26)21 Flag of Jamaica.svg Arnett Gardens Training camp, January 2019
MF Alyssa Julien Flag of the United States.svg Eastern Kentucky Colonels v. Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest, 28 October 2018

FW Mireya Grey (1998-09-07) 7 September 1998 (age 21)71 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Huskies 2019 Pan American Games
FW Olufolasade Adamolekun (2001-02-21) 21 February 2001 (age 18)70 Flag of the United States.svg USC Trojans 2019 Pan American Games
FW Shayla Smart (2000-05-30) 30 May 2000 (age 19)30 Flag of the United States.svg Wake Forest Demon Deacons 2019 Pan American Games
FW Kayla McCoy (1996-09-03) 3 September 1996 (age 23)30 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup INJ
FW Shakira Duncan (1989-01-10) 10 January 1989 (age 30)1324 Flag of Israel.svg Maccabi Holon v. Flag of Panama.svg  Panama, 19 May 2019
FW Shanoska Young (1989-04-26) 26 April 1989 (age 30)10 Flag of Israel.svg Maccabi Holon v. Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest, 28 October 2018
FW Shanel Spence Flag of Jamaica.svg Arnett Gardens v. Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest, 28 October 2018

Notes:

Records

As of 8 April 2018
Players in bold text are still active with Jamaica.

Managers

NameNatPositionYear
Grace Butterfield Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica National Senior Women's Team Manager1991
Jean Nelson Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica National Women's Teams Manager [19] [20] 1994
Jacqueline Cummings Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica National Women's Team Asst Manager1994
Elaine Walker-Brown Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica National Senior Women's Team Manager2014
Jean Nelson Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica National Women's Teams Manager2009–Present


Jamaica Women's Football Association
NameNatPositionYear
Jean Nelson Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica Women's Football Association President1991
Elaine Walker-Brown Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica Women's Football Association President1994

Current coaching staff

NameNatPosition
Hue Menzies Flag of England.svg Head coach
Andrew Price [21] Flag of Jamaica.svg Assistant coach
Lorne Donaldson Flag of Jamaica.svg Assistant coach
Hubert Busby Jr. Flag of Jamaica.svg Goalkeeping coach
Will Hitzelberger Flag of the United States.svg Physical Trainer
Jason Henry Flag of Jamaica.svg Physical Trainer
Dr Lori-Ann Miller Flag of Jamaica.svg Team Doctor
Saundria Codling Flag of Jamaica.svg Physiotherapist
Omar Folkes Flag of Jamaica.svg Equipment Manager
Sheridan Samuels [22] Flag of Jamaica.svg Head of delegation

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References

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