K. C. Keeler

Last updated
K. C. Keeler
Sport(s) Football
Current position
Title Head coach
Team Sam Houston State
Conference Southland
Record52–17
Biographical details
Born (1959-07-26) July 26, 1959 (age 59)
Emmaus, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1978–1980 Delaware
Position(s) Linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1981–1985 Amherst (assistant)
1986–1992 Rowan (assistant)
1993–2001Rowan
2002–2012 Delaware
2014–present Sam Houston State
Head coaching record
Overall226–90–1
Tournaments21–7 (NCAA D-III playoffs)
19–8 (NCAA D-I-AA/FCS playoffs)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 NCAA Division I-AA national (2003)
4 NJAC (1993, 1995, 1997, 2001)
2 A-10 (2003–2004)
1 CAA (2010)
2 Southland (2014, 2016)
Awards
Eddie Robinson Award (2016)
AFCA Coach of the Year (2010)
Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award (2010)

Kurt Charles "K. C." Keeler (born July 26, 1959) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at Sam Houston State University. He was the head football coach at the University of Delaware from 2002 to 2012. Keeler served as the head football coach at Rowan University from 1993 to 2001. His 2003 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens squad won the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship, and returned to the Division I Championship game in 2007 and 2010.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Sam Houston State University university

Sam Houston State University was founded in 1879 and is the third-oldest public institution of higher learning in Texas. It is approximately 70 miles north of downtown Houston, in Huntsville, Texas. It is one of the oldest purpose-built institutions for the instruction of teachers west of the Mississippi River and the first such institution in Texas. It is named for Sam Houston, who made his home in the city and is buried there.

University of Delaware American university

The University of Delaware is a public research university located in Newark, Delaware. University of Delaware is the largest university in Delaware. UD currently offers more than 135 undergraduate degrees. At the graduate level, it offers 67 doctoral, 142 master’s degree programs, 14 dual degrees, 15 interdisciplinary programs, 12 on-line programs, and 28 certificate programs across its seven colleges and more than 82 research centers and institutes. UD is one of the top 100 institutions for federal obligations in science and engineering and interdisciplinary initiatives in energy science and policy, the environment, and in human health. The main campus is in Newark, with satellite campuses in Dover, Wilmington, Lewes, and Georgetown. It is considered a large institution with approximately 18,500 undergraduate and 4,500 graduate students. UD is a privately governed university which receives public funding for being a land-grant, sea-grant, space-grant and urban-grant state-supported research institution.

Contents

Playing career

High school and college

Keeler played high school football at Emmaus High School in Emmaus, Pennsylvania. He went on to play collegiate football at the University of Delaware, where he was a linebacker from 1978 to 1980 under coach Tubby Raymond. He was a member of the 1979 Division II National Championship squad. [1] Once had 3 consecutive interceptions on 3 consecutive plays at University of Delaware.

Emmaus High School

Emmaus High School is a public high school located in Emmaus, Pennsylvania, in the United States. The school serves grades nine through 12 in Pennsylvania's East Penn School District in the Lehigh Valley region of the state. Emmaus High School is located immediately off Cedar Crest Boulevard, at 500 Macungie Avenue in Emmaus, a borough southwest of Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Emmaus, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Emmaus is a borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is located 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the state. It is 50 miles (80 km) north of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's largest city, and 20 miles (32 km) west of the Delaware River. Emmaus is located in the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is in the New York City-Newark, New Jersey, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area.

Linebacker defensive position in American football

A linebacker is a playing position in American football and Canadian football. Linebackers are members of the defensive team, and line up approximately three to five yards behind the line of scrimmage, behind the defensive linemen, and therefore "back up the line". Linebackers generally align themselves before the ball is snapped by standing upright in a "two-point stance".

NFL and USFL

In 1980, Keeler signed a free agent contract with the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. He was one of the last players released during the 1980 pre-season. He later earned tryouts again with the Eagles (1982–83) and with the United States Football League's Philadelphia Stars (1983) and Jacksonville Bulls (1984).

Philadelphia Eagles National Football League franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Philadelphia Eagles are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In the 2017 season the team won Super Bowl LII, their first Super Bowl win in franchise history and their fourth NFL title overall, after winning the Championship Game in 1948, 1949, and 1960.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

United States Football League American football league

The United States Football League (USFL) was an American football league that played for three seasons, 1983 through 1985. The league played a spring/summer schedule in each of its active seasons. The 1986 season was scheduled to be played in the autumn/winter, directly competing against the long-established National Football League (NFL). However, the USFL ceased operations before that season was scheduled to begin.

Coaching career

Amherst and Rowan

Keeler began his coaching career as an assistant at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1981 and then at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey in 1986. He became Rowan head coach in the 1993 season, ending his tenure in 2001 with an 88–21–1 (.804) record and seven NCAA Division III playoff appearances. [2] He was, however, 0–5 in NCAA Division III Football Championship Stagg Bowls at Rowan, losing by an average of 42.4 to 18.4.

Amherst College liberal arts college in Massachusetts

Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. Founded in 1821 as an attempt to relocate Williams College by its then-president Zephaniah Swift Moore, Amherst is the third oldest institution of higher education in Massachusetts. The institution was named after the town, which in turn had been named after Jeffery, Lord Amherst. Originally established as a men's college, Amherst became coeducational in 1975.

Amherst, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Amherst is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States, in the Connecticut River valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,819, making it the highest populated municipality in Hampshire County. The town is home to Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, three of the Five Colleges. The name of the town is pronounced without the h ("AM-erst"), giving rise to the local saying, "only the 'h' is silent", in reference both to the pronunciation and to the town's politically active populace.

Rowan University university in New Jersey, USA

Rowan University is a public research university in Glassboro, New Jersey, United States, with a satellite campus in Camden, New Jersey. The school was founded in 1923 as Glassboro Normal School on a 25-acre (10 ha) site donated by 107 local residents. The school became New Jersey State Teachers College at Glassboro in the 1930s, and Glassboro State College in 1958. Starting in the 1970s, it grew into a multi-purpose institution, adding programs in business and communications.

Delaware

After Raymond retired in 2002, Keeler was named the fourth Delaware head football coach in 62 years. He immediately brought a new offensive philosophy to the team, replacing its famed and historic Winged-T formation with a no-huddle, spread offense. Under Keeler, Delaware won its first national championship since 1979 and its first-ever Division I-AA title (in 2003) with a 15–1 record and a 149–23 total score in the four-game playoff series.

T formation

In American football, a T formation is a formation used by the offensive team in which three running backs line up in a row about five yards behind the quarterback, forming the shape of a "T".

The hurry-up offense is an American football offensive style, which has two different but related forms in which the offensive team avoids delays between plays. The hurry-up, no-huddle offense (HUNH) refers to avoiding or shortening the huddle to limit or disrupt defensive strategies and flexibility. The two-minute drill is a clock-management strategy that may limit huddles but also emphasizes plays that stop the game clock. While the two-minute drill refers to parts of the game with little time remaining on the game clock, the no-huddle may be used in some form at any time. The no-huddle offense was pioneered by the Cincinnati Bengals and reached its most famous and complete usage by the Buffalo Bills, nicknamed the "K-Gun", during the 1990s under head coach Marv Levy and offensive coordinator Ted Marchibroda.

Keeler became as much of a celebrity in Delaware as Raymond. He was named "Delawarean of the Year" in 2004 by Delaware Today magazine and was listed as one of the top college football recruiters in the nation by American Football Monthly magazine. The (Wilmington) News Journal reported that Keeler was forced to hire an agent after the 2003 championship to help manage speaking engagements, guest appearances and private functions. His trademark sunglasses (which he also wore during night games) and wireless headgear were emulated with K.C. Keeler bobbleheads sold at games and local Newark, Delaware businesses.

Delaware State of the United States of America

Delaware is one of the 50 states of the United States, in the South-Atlantic or Southern region. It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, north by Pennsylvania, and east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.

<i>The News Journal</i> Delaware newspaper

The News Journal is the main newspaper for Wilmington, Delaware, and the surrounding area. It is headquartered in unincorporated New Castle County, Delaware, near New Castle, and is owned by Gannett.

Bobblehead doll with a large head on a spring

A bobblehead, also known as a nodder, wobbler or bobble head, is a type of collectible doll. Its head is often oversized compared to its body. Instead of a solid connection, its head is connected to the body by a spring or hook in such a way that a light tap will cause the head to bobble, hence the name.

Keeler often attacked criticism that I-AA/FCS programs are of lesser caliber than I-A. "We're the LSU; we're the Georgia, the Florida of Division I-AA," Keeler said in a 2004 interview with American Football Monthly. "We have every resource. There's some people who have better resources than we do, but in general, the college campus we have is in one of the greatest college towns in America, and the academics ... we led the nation last year in out-of-state applications, more than Michigan or Texas. But that's what this school has become. Everybody wants to come to school here." [3]

On June 19, 2008, Keeler was granted a 10-year contract extension to keep him on as head coach of the Blue Hens through the 2017 season. However, following the 2012 season, in which his team posted a 5−6 record, Keeler was fired. [4]

Sam Houston State

On January 23, 2014, Keeler was named the 15th head coach in Sam Houston State program history. [5]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsTSN/STATS#Coaches°
Rowan Profs (New Jersey Athletic Conference)(1993–2001)
1993 Rowan11–25–01stL NCAA Division III Championship
1994 Rowan6–33–2T–3rd
1995 Rowan10–3–15–01stL NCAA Division III Championship
1996 Rowan10–34–12ndL NCAA Division III Championship
1997 Rowan11–15–01stL NCAA Division III Semifinal
1998 Rowan10–34–12ndL NCAA Division III Championship
1999 Rowan12–24–12ndL NCAA Division III Championship
2000 Rowan7–25–12nd
2001 Rowan11–25–1T–1stL NCAA Division III Semifinal
Rowan:88–21–138–7
Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens (Atlantic 10 Conference)(2002–2006)
2002 Delaware 6–64–5T–6th
2003 Delaware 15–18–1T–1stW NCAA Division I-AA Championship 11
2004 Delaware 9–47–1T–1st (South)L NCAA Division I-AA Quarterfinal 7
2005 Delaware 6–53–53rd (South)
2006 Delaware 5–64–5T–4th (South)
Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens (Colonial Athletic Association)(2007–2012)
2007 Delaware 11–45–3T–3rd (South)L NCAA Division I Championship 22
2008 Delaware 4–82–65th (South)
2009 Delaware 6–54–4T–4th (South)
2010 Delaware 12–36–2T–1stL NCAA Division I Championship 22
2011 Delaware 7–45–3T–5th1720
2012 Delaware 5–62–68th
Delaware:86–5249–41
Sam Houston State Bearkats (Southland Conference)(2014–present)
2014 Sam Houston State 11–57–1T–1stL NCAA Division I Semifinal 66
2015 Sam Houston State 11–47–22ndL NCAA Division I Semifinal 34
2016 Sam Houston State 12–19–01stL NCAA Division I Quarterfinal 55
2017 Sam Houston State 12–28–12ndL NCAA Division I Semifinal 43
2018 Sam Houston State 6–55–4T–4th
Sam Houston State:52–1736-8
Total:226–90–1
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth
  • #Rankings from final Sports Network Poll.

Coaching tree

Assistant coaches under K. C. Keeler who became NCAA head coaches:

See also

Related Research Articles

Harold R. "Tubby" Raymond was an American football and baseball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Delaware from 1966 to 2001, compiling a record of 300–119–3. Raymond was also the head baseball coach at the University of Maine from 1952 to 1953 and at Delaware from 1956 to 1964, tallying a career college baseball mark of 164–72–3. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2003.

Delaware Fightin Blue Hens football

The Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represents the University of Delaware in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) college football. The team is currently led by head coach Danny Rocco and plays on Tubby Raymond Field at 22,000-seat Delaware Stadium located in Newark, Delaware. The Fightin' Blue Hens have won six national titles in their 117-year history – 1946, 1963, 1971, 1972, 1979, and 2003. They returned to the FCS National Championship game in 2007 and 2010.

Sam Houston State Bearkats

The Sam Houston State Bearkats represent Sam Houston State University in intercollegiate athletics. Sam Houston State's colors are orange and white and their sports teams' nickname is the Bearkats. Sam Houston State sports teams participate in NCAA Division I in the Southland Conference. SHSU's primary rival is Stephen F. Austin State University and tensions between the two schools can run high before major sporting events that pit one against the other.

Delaware State Hornets football

The Delaware State Hornets football team compete in Division I FCS, and are full-members of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. They are a five-time conference champion and made their first-ever FCS playoff appearance in 2007. They play at the 7,193-seat Alumni Stadium located in Dover, Delaware. The facility opened in 1957 as a multi-purpose for football, and track and field.

The 2008 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2008 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA). K. C. Keeler served as head coach for the seventh season. Keeler twice brought the Blue Hens to the FCS championship game, and won in 2003. In 2007, the team lost in the final to Appalachian State. The 2008 season proved to be one of Delaware's worst seasons in its 117-year history. It was the only year that the Blue Hens have lost eight games.

Delaware Fightin Blue Hens Athletic teams that represent the University of Deleware

The Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens are the athletic teams of the University of Delaware of Newark, Delaware, in the United States. The Blue Hens compete in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) of Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as members of the Colonial Athletic Association.

2010 Delaware Fightin Blue Hens football team

The 2010 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2010 NCAA Division I FCS football season. They played their home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware. They were co–champions of the Colonial Athletic Association and advanced to the National Championship game before falling to Eastern Washington by blowing a 19 point lead with 16:30 left in the game. They finished with a record of 12–3, 6–2 in CAA play. Delaware received one vote in the AP Poll following their wins against Towson and UMass.

2011 Delaware Fightin Blue Hens football team

The 2011 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2011 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Blue Hens were led by 10th-year head coach K. C. Keeler and played their home games at Delaware Stadium. They were a member of the Colonial Athletic Association. They finished the season 7–4, 5–3 in CAA to finish in a tie for fifth place and were not invited to the FCS playoffs.

2012 Delaware Fightin Blue Hens football team

The 2012 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2012 NCAA Division I FCS football season. They were led by 11th-year head coach K. C. Keeler and played their home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware. They were a member of the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA). They finished the season 5–6, 2–6 in CAA play to finish in eighth place. Following the season, the school fired Keeler.

The 2006 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2006 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference (A-10). It was program's final season of play in the A-10. They were led by K. C. Keeler, who was in his fifth season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 2005 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2005 NCAA Division I-AA football season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference (A–10). They were led by K. C. Keeler, who was in his fourth season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 2004 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2004 NCAA Division I-AA football season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference. They were led by K. C. Keeler, who was in his third season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 2002 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in the 2002 NCAA Division I-AA football season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference (A–10). They were led by K. C. Keeler, who was in his first season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens after taking over following Tubby Raymond'fs retirement. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 2001 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in NCAA Division I-AA college football in its fifth season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference (A–10). They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 36th season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware. Coach Raymond would go on to retire following the season, ending his career with 300 wins, and would be replaced by K.C. Keeler. The September 15th game scheduled against West Chester was cancelled after the September 11 attacks.

The 2000 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in NCAA Division I-AA college football in its fourth season as a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference (A–10). They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 35th season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 1989 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in NCAA Division I-AA college football in its fourth season as a member of the Yankee Conference. They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 24th season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware. The season finale against Navy would prove to be the Midshipmen's final appearance at Delaware Stadium.

The 1988 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in NCAA Division I-AA college football in its third season as a member of the Yankee Conference. They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 23rd season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 1987 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in NCAA Division I-AA college football in its second season as a member of the Yankee Conference. They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 22nd season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

The 1986 Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football team represented the University of Delaware in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Division I-AA college football in its first season as a member of the Yankee Conference, after having been an Independent for the previous 16 seasons. They were led by Tubby Raymond, who was in his 21st season as head coach of the Fightin' Blue Hens. Quarterback Rich Gannon was a senior, and followed this season with an 18-year NFL career. The team played its home games at Delaware Stadium in Newark, Delaware.

References

  1. "Settling it on the field". Sports Illustrated . December 19, 2003. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  2. "Head Coach K. C. Keeler". Udel.edu. June 15, 2010. Archived from the original on May 9, 2008. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  3. Purdum, David (September 2004). "His Own Man". American Football Monthly. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  4. Tresolini, Kevin (January 7, 2013). "UD fires football coach K.C. Keeler". The News Journal. Retrieved January 7, 2013.
  5. Roepken, Corey (January 23, 2014). "Sam Houston State hires K.C. Keeler as head football coach". Houston Chronicle.