Glassboro, New Jersey

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Glassboro, New Jersey
Borough of Glassboro
Glassboro NJ Collage.png
Clockwise from top right: Glassblower Statue, Bunce Hall (Rowan University), glass bottles from area glassworks, Glassboro Municipal Building, Hollybush Mansion, panorama of the Rowan Boulevard downtown area, Glassboro Water Tower, and Historic West Jersey Depot (old train station).
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Working Logo
Nickname(s): 
Summit City; [1] Borough of Glass[ citation needed ]
Map of Gloucester County highlighting Glassboro.png
Glassboro highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Glassboro, New Jersey.png
Census Bureau map of Glassboro, New Jersey
Location map of Gloucester County, New Jersey.svg
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Glassboro
Location in Gloucester County
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Glassboro
Location in New Jersey
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Glassboro
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°42′00″N75°06′41″W / 39.700096°N 75.111423°W / 39.700096; -75.111423 Coordinates: 39°42′00″N75°06′41″W / 39.700096°N 75.111423°W / 39.700096; -75.111423 [2] [3]
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of New Jersey.svg  New Jersey
County Flag of Gloucester County, New Jersey.png Gloucester
Established1779
Incorporated March 11, 1878
Named for Glass industry
Government
[4]
  Type Borough
  BodyBorough Council
   Mayor John E. Wallace III (D, term ends December 31, 2021) [5] [6]
   Administrator Ed Malandro [7]
   Municipal clerk Karen Cosgrove [8]
Area
[2]
  Total9.221 sq mi (23.882 km2)
  Land9.184 sq mi (23.787 km2)
  Water0.037 sq mi (0.095 km2)  0.40%
Area rank217th of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county [2]
Elevation
[9]
148 ft (45 m)
Population
  Total18,579
  Estimate 
(2018) [13]
19,992
  Rank137th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county [14]
  Density2,022.9/sq mi (781.0/km2)
  Density rank291st of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county [14]
Time zone UTC−5:00 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC−4:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08028 [15] [16]
Area code(s) +1 (856) exchanges: 442, 863, 881, [17] 256 (Rowan University)
FIPS code 3401526340 [2] [18] [19]
GNIS feature ID0885231 [2] [20]
Website www.glassboroonline.com

Glassboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 18,579, [10] [11] [12] reflecting a decline of 489 (−2.6%) from the 19,068 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,454 (+22.1%) over the 15,614 counted in the 1990 Census. [21]

A borough, in the context of local government in the U.S. state of New Jersey, refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government.

Gloucester County, New Jersey County in New Jersey

Gloucester County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 292,206, making it the state's 14th-most populous county, an increase of 1.4% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 288,288, in turn an increase of 33,615 (+13.2%) from the 254,673 counted in the 2000 U.S. Census. The percentage increase in the county's population between 2000 and 2010 was the largest in New Jersey, almost triple the statewide increase of 4.5%, and the absolute increase in residents was the third highest. Its county seat is Woodbury.

New Jersey State in the United States

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. It is a peninsula, bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by the Delaware Bay and Delaware. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017, making it the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states with its biggest city being Newark. New Jersey lies completely within the combined statistical areas of New York City and Philadelphia. New Jersey was the second-wealthiest U.S. state by median household income as of 2017.

Contents

What is now Glassboro was originally formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1878, from portions of Clayton Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Elk Township (April 17, 1891) and Pitman (May 24, 1905). Glassboro was incorporated as a borough on March 18, 1920, replacing Glassboro Township. [22] The borough was named for its glass industry. [23] [24] [25]

A township, in the context of New Jersey local government, refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. As a political entity, a township in New Jersey is a full-fledged municipality, on par with any town, city, borough, or village. They collect property taxes and provide services such as maintaining roads, garbage collection, water, sewer, schools, police and fire protection. The Township form of local government is used by 27% of New Jersey municipalities; however, slightly over 50% of the state's population resides within them.

New Jersey Legislature the legislature of the U.S. state of New Jersey

The New Jersey Legislature is the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state of New Jersey. In its current form, as defined by the New Jersey Constitution of 1947, the Legislature consists of two houses: the General Assembly and the Senate. The Legislature meets in the New Jersey State House, in the state capital of Trenton. Democrats currently hold super majorities in both chambers of the legislature.

Clayton, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Clayton is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,179, reflecting an increase of 1,040 (+14.6%) from the 7,139 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 984 (+16.0%) from the 6,155 counted in the 1990 Census.

Glassboro is home to Rowan University, founded in 1923 and formerly known as Glassboro State College, which was the site of the Glassboro Summit Conference in 1967 between U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin. [26] [27]

Rowan University university in New Jersey, USA

Rowan University is a public research university in Glassboro, New Jersey, with a medical campus in Stratford, New Jersey and medical and academic campuses in Camden, New Jersey. The university was founded in 1923 as Glassboro Normal School on a 25-acre (10 ha) site donated by 107 local residents.

Glassboro Summit Conference

The Glassboro Summit Conference, usually just called the Glassboro Summit, was the 23–25 June 1967 meeting of the heads of government of the United States and the Soviet Union—President Lyndon B. Johnson and Premier Alexei Kosygin, respectively—for the purpose of discussing Soviet Union–United States relations in Glassboro, New Jersey. During the Arab–Israeli Six-Day War diplomatic contact and cooperation increased, leading some to hope for an improvement in the two countries' relations. Some even hoped for joint cooperation on the Vietnam War. Although Johnson and Kosygin failed to reach agreement on anything important, the generally amicable atmosphere of the summit was referred to as the "Spirit of Glassboro" and is seen to have improved Soviet–US relations.

Lyndon B. Johnson 36th president of the United States

Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to by the initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969. Formerly the 37th vice president from 1961 to 1963, he assumed the presidency following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. A Democrat from Texas, Johnson also served as a United States Representative and as the Majority Leader in the United States Senate. Johnson is one of only four people who have served in all four federal elected positions.

History

St. Thomas Episcopal Church, built in 1846, is one of the oldest buildings in the borough. St Toms NJ.JPG
St. Thomas Episcopal Church, built in 1846, is one of the oldest buildings in the borough.

Glassboro's early history was built on the manufacturing of glass. The town was first established in 1779 by Solomon Stanger as "Glass Works in the Woods"; glass manufacturers over the years since include Heston-Carpenter Glass Works, Olive Glass Works, Harmony Glass Works, Temperanceville Glass Works, Whitney Brothers Glass Works, Owens Bottle Company, Owens Illinois Glass Company, and Anchor Hocking. [28]

In 1958, an epidemic of typhoid fever broke out in the predominantly African American neighborhoods of Elsmere and Lawns, which was attributed to 20 years of municipal neglect of the sanitary infrastructure. [29]

Typhoid fever Bacterial infection due to a specific type of Salmonella

Typhoid fever, also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to a specific type of Salmonella that causes symptoms. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe, and usually begin 6 to 30 days after exposure. Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days. This is commonly accompanied by weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, headaches, and mild vomiting. Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots. In severe cases, people may experience confusion. Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months. Diarrhea is uncommon. Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others. Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever, along with paratyphoid fever.

The Glassboro Summit Conference between U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin took place in Glassboro. Johnson and Kosygin met for three days from June 23 to June 25, 1967, at Glassboro State College (later renamed Rowan University). The location was chosen as a compromise. Kosygin, having agreed to address the United Nations in New York City, wanted to meet in New York. Johnson, wary of encountering protests against the Vietnam War, preferred to meet in Washington, D.C. They agreed on Glassboro because it was equidistant between the two cities. [30] The generally amicable atmosphere of the summit was referred to as the "Spirit of Glassboro," although the leaders failed to reach agreement on limiting anti-ballistic missile systems.

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Premier of the Soviet Union Head of government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

The Premier of the Soviet Union was the head of government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). The office had three different names throughout its existence: Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars (1923–1946), Chairman of the Council of Ministers (1946–1991) and Prime Minister of the Soviet Union (1991). The term premier was used by outside commentators to describe the office of head of government.

Alexei Kosygin Soviet politician

Alexei Nikolayevich Kosygin was a Soviet-Russian statesman during the Cold War. Kosygin was born in the city of Saint Petersburg in 1904 to a Russian working-class family. He was conscripted into the labour army during the Russian Civil War, and after the Red Army's demobilisation in 1921, he worked in Siberia as an industrial manager. Kosygin returned to Leningrad in the early 1930s and worked his way up the Soviet hierarchy. During the Great Patriotic War, Kosygin was a member of the State Defence Committee and was tasked with moving Soviet industry out of territories soon to be overrun by the German Army. He served as Minister of Finance for a year before becoming Minister of Light Industry. Stalin removed Kosygin from the Politburo one year before his own death in 1953, intentionally weakening Kosygin's position within the Soviet hierarchy.

On June 19, 1986, Ronald Reagan became the first sitting president to speak at a high school graduation when he spoke at the Glassboro High School commencement ceremonies. [31]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 9.221 square miles (23.882 km2), including 9.184 square miles (23.787 km2) of land and 0.037 square miles (0.095 km2) of water (0.40%). [2] [3]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Elsemere. [32]

Glassboro borders Clayton Borough, Elk Township, Harrison Township, Mantua Township, Monroe Township, Pitman and Washington Township. [33] [34]

Climate

The climate in the area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Glassboro has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [35]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 2,088
1890 2,64226.5%
1900 2,677*1.3%
1910 2,821*5.4%
1920 3,0738.9%
1930 4,79956.2%
1940 4,9252.6%
1950 5,86719.1%
1960 10,25374.8%
1970 12,93826.2%
1980 14,57412.6%
1990 15,6147.1%
2000 19,06822.1%
2010 18,579−2.6%
Est. 201819,992 [13] [36] [37] 7.6%
Population sources: 1880–2000 [38]
1880–1920 [39] 1880–1890 [40]
1890–1910 [41] 1910–1930 [42]
1930–1990 [43] 2000 [44] [45] 2010 [10] [11] [12]
* = Lost territory in previous decade. [22]

Census 2010

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 18,579 people, 6,158 households, and 3,971.910 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,022.9 per square mile (781.0/km2). There were 6,590 housing units at an average density of 717.5 per square mile (277.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 72.25% (13,423) White, 18.67% (3,469) Black or African American, 0.11% (21) Native American, 2.87% (534) Asian, 0.05% (10) Pacific Islander, 3.12% (580) from other races, and 2.92% (542) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.42% (1,378) of the population. [10]

There were 6,158 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.13. [10]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.4% under the age of 18, 26.4% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28.4 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 95.0 males. [10]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $54,795 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,793) and the median family income was $67,171 (+/- $9,496). Males had a median income of $49,695 (+/- $4,361) versus $43,489 (+/- $2,608) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,108 (+/- $1,421). About 9.3% of families and 14.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.6% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over. [46]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census [18] there were 19,068 people, 6,225 households, and 4,046 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,071.3 people per square mile (799.4/km²). There were 6,555 housing units at an average density of 712.0 per square mile (274.8/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 74.5% White, 19.5% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.5% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.8% of the population. [44] [45]

There were 6,225 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.17. [44] [45]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.1% under the age of 18, 25.6% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 16.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males. [44] [45]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,992, and the median income for a family was $55,246. Males had a median income of $40,139 versus $30,358 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,113. About 8.5% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over. [44] [45]

Parks and recreation

The Glassboro Wildlife Management Area covers almost 2,400 acres (970 ha) in portions of Glassboro, Clayton and Monroe Township. [47] [48]

Government

Local government

Glassboro is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. [4] The Borough form of government used by Glassboro, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council. [49] [50]

As of 2019, the Mayor of Glassboro is Democrat John E. Wallace, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022. [5] Members of the Borough Council are Council President George P. Cossabone Sr. (D, 2019), Joe D'Alessandro (D, 2020), Andrew Halter (D, 2021), Anna Miller (D, 2021) and Daniele Spence (D, 2019; appointed to serve an unexpired term), with one seat expiring in December 2020 remaining vacant. [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56]

In March 2019, Danielle Spence was selected to fill the seat on the Borough Council expiring in December 2019 that had been held by Edward A. Malandro. [57]

Anna Miller was appointed by the borough council in March 2013 from among three candidates offered by the municipal Democratic committee to fill the vacant seat of George Cossabone. [58] [59]

Federal, state and county representation

Glassboro is located in the 1st Congressional District [60] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district. [11] [61] [62] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Glassboro had been in the 4th state legislative district. [63]

For the 116th United States Congress , New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross ( D , Camden ). [64] [65] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker ( Newark , term ends 2021) [66] and Bob Menendez ( Paramus , term ends 2025). [67] [68]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township). [69] [70]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders , whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2018, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger ( D , West Deptford Township ; term as freeholder and as freeholder director ends December 31, 2018), [71] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township ; term as freeholder and as freeholder deputy director ends 2018), [72] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township ; 2020), [73] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township ; 2019), [74] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township ; 2019), [75] Jim Jefferson (D, Woodbury ; 2020) [76] and Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro ; 2020). [77] [78] [79] [80] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan (D, Franklinville in Franklin Township ; 2022), [81] [82] Sheriff Carmel Morina (D, Greenwich Township; 2018) [83] [84] and Surrogate Helene M. Reed (D, Monroe Township ; 2022). [85] [86] [80] [87]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,772 registered voters in Glassboro, of which 3,733 (38.2%) were registered as Democrats, 1,408 (14.4%) were registered as Republicans and 4,617 (47.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties. [88]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 63.7% of the vote (4,578 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 34.6% (2,485 votes), and other candidates with 1.8% (128 votes), among the 7,252 ballots cast by the borough's 10,804 registered voters (61 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 67.1%. [89] [90] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.8% of the vote (4,516 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 35.4% (2,547 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (62 votes), among the 7,195 ballots cast by the borough's 10,312 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.8%. [91] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 58.5% of the vote (3,930 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 40.1% (2,699 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (60 votes), among the 6,723 ballots cast by the borough's 9,801 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.6. [92]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 53.0% of the vote (2,106 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 45.0% (1,786 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (80 votes), among the 4,074 ballots cast by the borough's 10,838 registered voters (102 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 37.6%. [93] [94] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 51.7% of the vote (2,198 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 39.0% (1,659 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.7% (287 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (29 votes), among the 4,255 ballots cast by the borough's 9,958 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout. [95]

Education

Glassboro Intermediate School Glassboro Intermediate School.jpg
Glassboro Intermediate School

The Glassboro Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2017-18 school year, the district and its five schools had an enrollment of 2,088 students and 179.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.7:1. [96] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics [97] ) are J. Harvey Rodgers School [98] (291 students; in grades PreK and kindergarten), Dorothy L. Bullock School [99] (462; 1-3), Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School [100] (463; 4-6), Glassboro Intermediate School [101] (287; 7-8) and Glassboro High School [102] (533; 9-12). [103] [104]

Students from across the county are eligible to apply to attend Gloucester County Institute of Technology, a four-year high school in Deptford Township that provides technical and vocational education. As a public school, students do not pay tuition to attend the school. [105]

Rowan University is a public university with an enrollment of 19,500 undergraduate and graduate students in 2018-19. [106] The university was founded in 1923 as Glassboro Normal School on a 25-acre (10 ha) site donated by the borough. The school became New Jersey State Teachers College at Glassboro in 1937 and Glassboro State College in 1958. Starting in the 1970s, it expanded into a multi-purpose institution, adding programs in business, communications, and engineering. [27] Rowan Boulevard is a mixed-use development intended to provide a vibrant downtown district for Glassboro, incorporating university student life into its design, as part of an effort to accommodate a student body that is projected to grow to about 25,000 in 2023. [107]

Transportation

US 322 and Route 47 in Glassboro 2018-08-26 14 31 16 View west along U.S. Route 322 and Gloucester County Route 536 and north along New Jersey State Route 47 (Delsea Drive) at Gloucester County Route 689 (New Street) in Glassboro, Gloucester County, New Jersey.jpg
US 322 and Route 47 in Glassboro

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 78.43 miles (126.22 km) of roadways, of which 57.61 miles (92.71 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.29 miles (21.39 km) by Gloucester County and 7.53 miles (12.12 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation. [108]

Glassboro is crisscrossed by a number of major roads. County Route 553, [109] Route 47 [110] and Route 55 (limited access) [111] travel north-south, while U.S. Route 322 (much of which is also Mullica Hill Road) passes through east-west. [112]

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Philadelphia on the 313, 408 and 412 routes. [113] [114]

The Pureland East-West Community Shuttle connects the Pureland Industrial Complex and the Avandale Park and Ride. [115]

Passenger train service to Glassboro existed from 1860 to 1971. The station used by the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines is being renovated as a visitor center. [116] [117] [118] The station is a planned terminal on the Glassboro–Camden Line, an 18-mile (28.97 km) diesel multiple unit (DMU) light rail system. [119] [120] Completion is expected for 2025. [121]

Walking and cycling

Walking is a popular form of transportation especially around the university where many underclassmen are not permitted to have cars. [122]

The Glassboro - Williamstown Trail (also known as the Monroe Township Bikepath) runs for more than 6 miles (9.7 km) between Glassboro and the Williamstown section of Monroe Township. The trail traverses the Glassboro State Wildlife Refuge before terminating at Delsea Drive. [123] Future work will extend this trail along former railroad right of way from Delsea Drive to Rowan U's Bunce Hall. Path links to Elmer and Pitman are also proposed.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Glassboro include:

See also

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Newfield, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Newfield is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,553, reflecting a decline of 63 (-3.9%) from the 1,616 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 24 (+1.5%) from the 1,592 counted in the 1990 Census.

Paulsboro, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Paulsboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,097, reflecting a decline of 63 (-1.0%) from the 6,160 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 417 (-6.3%) from the 6,577 counted in the 1990 Census.

Pitman, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Pitman is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 9,011, reflecting a decline of 320 (−3.4%) from the 9,331 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 34 (−0.4%) from the 9,365 counted in the 1990 Census. The borough was named for Rev. Charles Pitman, a Methodist minister.

South Harrison Township, New Jersey Township in New Jersey

South Harrison Township is a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,162, reflecting an increase of 745 (+30.8%) from the 2,417 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 498 (+26.0%) from the 1,919 counted in the 1990 Census.

Swedesboro, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Swedesboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,584, reflecting an increase of 529 (+25.7%) from the 2,055 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 31 (+1.5%) from the 2,024 counted in the 1990 Census.

Washington Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Township in New Jersey

Washington Township is a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. In the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 48,559, reflecting an increase of 1,445 (+3.1%) from the 47,114 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,154 (+12.3%) from the 41,960 counted in the 1990 Census.

Wenonah, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Wenonah is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,278, reflecting a decline of 39 (-1.7%) from the 2,317 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 14 (-0.6%) from the 2,331 counted in the 1990 Census. It is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) south of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Westville, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Westville is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,288, reflecting a decline of 212 (-4.7%) from the 4,500 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 73 (-1.6%) from the 4,573 counted in the 1990 Census. The Borough of Westville is known as "The Gateway to South Jersey!"

Woodbury Heights, New Jersey Borough in New Jersey

Woodbury Heights is a borough located in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2000 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,055, reflecting an increase of 67 (+2.2%) from the 2,988 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 404 (-11.9%) from the 3,392 counted in the 1990 Census.

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