Mai-Ndombe Province

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Mai-Ndombe
Province de Mai-Ndombe
Maindombe1.JPG
Democratic Republic of the Congo (26 provinces) - Mai-Ndombe.svg
Coordinates: 01°57′S18°16′E / 1.950°S 18.267°E / -1.950; 18.267 Coordinates: 01°57′S18°16′E / 1.950°S 18.267°E / -1.950; 18.267
CountryFlag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg  DR Congo
Established2015 (2015)
Named for Lake Maï Ndombe
Capital Inongo
Government
  GovernorPaul Mputu Boleilanga [1]
  Vice-governorJacks Mbombaka Bokoso [1]
Area
  Total127,465 km2 (49,215 sq mi)
Population
 (2005 est.)
  Total1,768,327
  Density14/km2 (36/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+1 (WAT)
Official language French

Mai-Ndombe is one of the 21 new provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo created in the 2015 repartitioning. Mai-Ndombe, Kwango, and Kwilu provinces are the result of the dismemberment of the former Bandundu province. [2] Mai-Ndombe was formed from the Plateaux and Mai-Ndombe districts. The town of Inongo was elevated to capital city of the new province.

History

Mai-Ndombe Province was a separate province from 1962 to 1966, prior the creation of Bandundu Province from the post-colonial political regions of Kwango, Kwilu, and Mai-Ndombe. Presidents (from 1965, governors) were:[ citation needed ]

A whaling vessel sank in the province in 2021, killing at least 60 people. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Mfundu, Thierry (26 June 2019). "Felix Tshisekedi investit Carly Nzanzu Kasivita et Paul Mputu respectivement gouverneurs du Nord Kivu et Mai Ndombe". POLITICO.CD. Retrieved 8 July 2019.
  2. "RDC: démembrement effectif du Bandundu". Radio Okapi (in French). 19 July 2015. Archived from the original on 20 July 2015. Retrieved 4 June 2020.
  3. "Congo River: At least 60 drowned after boat capsizes". BBC News. 2021-02-16. Retrieved 2021-02-17.