New Zealand Outdoors Party

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The New Zealand Outdoors Party is a registered political party in New Zealand. The Party is led by Co-Leaders Alan Simmons and David Haynes and seeks to protect New Zealand's environment and "outdoors heritage." [1]

A political party is an organized group of people, with broadly common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Contents

Principles and policies

The New Zealand Outdoors Party aims to protect the environment and New Zealand's "outdoors heritage", [1] and advocates for clean, full and unmodified rivers, greater protection from development for the conservation estate, large game animals to be managed by all hunters for recreation and conservation benefit, removal of ecologically destructive trawling practices within the inshore fishery and a Futures Commission to determine environmental limits to the growth of population, tourism, economy and infrastructure. [2]

History

The New Zealand Outdoors Party was launched in September 2015 by Co-Leaders Alan Simmons and David Haynes with the aim of protecting New Zealand's environment and outdoor heritage. [1] In its December 2016 newsletter, the party stated it was "pushing hard" to get to 500 members so that it could register. [3] In a letter to Rural News, Simmons claimed the party "has possibly more members than some parties already in Parliament", though did not give figures. [4]

On 22 July 2017 the party applied for registration with the Electoral Commission. [5] Registration was granted on 11 August 2017. [6] The party stood four electorate candidates in Nelson, Taupō, Maungakiekie and Hutt South. The same four candidates were also on the party list for the 2017 general election. [2] During the 2017 general election, the Outdoors Party gained 0.1% of the party vote and failed to win any seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives. [7]

Nelson (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Nelson is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives of New Zealand. From 1853 to 1860, the electorate was called Town of Nelson. From 1860 to 1881, it was City of Nelson. The electorate is the only one that has continuously existed since the 1st Parliament in 1853.

Taupō (New Zealand electorate)

Taupō is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. Taupo first existed between 1963 and 1981, and was recreated for the introduction of MMP in 1996. The current MP for Taupō is Louise Upston of the National Party. She has held this position since 2008.

Maungakiekie (New Zealand electorate)

Maungakiekie is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Maungakiekie is Denise Lee of the National Party. The name is from Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill, a large and symbolically important hill at the western end of the seat; the name denotes the presence of kiekie vines on the hill.

Electoral results

ElectionCandidates nominatedSeats wonVotesVote share %Government
ElectorateList
2017 44
0 / 120
1,6200.1%Not In Parliament

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "A new political party based on the Outdoors." Scoop. 21 September 2015. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  2. 1 2 "The Outdoors Party wants to get into Parliament". NewsHub. 22 August 2017. Retrieved 22 August 2017.
  3. "NZ Outdoors Party Newsletter December 2016". www.outdoorsparty.co.nz. Retrieved 2017-01-22.
  4. "NZ Outdoors Party Newsletter". www.outdoorsparty.co.nz. Retrieved 2017-01-22.
  5. "Application to register political party and logo". Electoral Commission. 22 July 2017. Retrieved 28 July 2017.
  6. "Registration of NZ Outdoors Party and Logo". Electoral Commission. 11 August 2017. Retrieved 11 August 2017.
  7. "2017 General Election - Official Result". New Zealand Electoral Commission . Retrieved 7 October 2017.