Outdoor Recreation New Zealand

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Outdoor Recreation New Zealand (ORNZ) was an organisation and political party in New Zealand, concerned primarily with lobbying for the hunting and fishing fraternity, but also including other people who participate in other outdoor sports. The party stated its goal was to fight "the rapid erosion of sporting rights, resources and opportunities for outdoor sportspeople", claiming that current environmental policies impose unreasonable restrictions.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Hunting Searching, pursuing, catching and killing wild animals

Hunting is the practice of killing or trapping animals, or pursuing or tracking them with the intent of doing so. Hunting wildlife or feral animals is most commonly done by humans for food, recreation, to remove predators that can be dangerous to humans or domestic animals, or for trade. Lawful hunting is distinguished from poaching, which is the illegal killing, trapping or capture of the hunted species. The species that are hunted are referred to as game or prey and are usually mammals and birds.

Fishing Activity of trying to catch fish

Fishing is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. “Fishing” may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not normally applied to catching farmed fish, or to aquatic mammals, such as whales where the term whaling is more appropriate. In addition to being caught to be eaten, fish are caught as recreational pastimes. Fishing tournaments are held, and caught fish are sometimes kept as preserved or living trophies. When bioblitzes occur, fish are typically caught, identified, and then released.

The party was first proposed in October 2001. Shortly afterwards, a meeting near Nelson agreed to establish a political party. The founders of the party said that "lobbying government has never been effective", and that establishing a political party was the only way to achieve their goals. On 8 March 2002, the party successfully registered with the Electoral Commission, having obtained the necessary five hundred members. This entitled it to seek and gain list votes under the MMP system. The party also gained government funding for broadcasting.

Nelson, New Zealand City in Nelson City, New Zealand

Nelson is a city on the eastern shores of Tasman Bay. Nelson is the oldest city in the South Island and the second-oldest settled city in New Zealand – it was established in 1841 and was proclaimed a city by royal charter in 1858.

Outdoor Recreation New Zealand had its first test in the 2002 election. It won 25,985 votes, around 1.28% of the total. [1]

In 2003, the party announced that it would be seeking an agreement with the larger United Future New Zealand party, which was already in parliament. This agreement, further elaborated on in 2004, saw Outdoor Recreation "become affiliated" to United Future – Outdoor Recreation retained its separate identity, but contested the 2005 election under the United Future banner. It did not, however, gain any seats; of the three MPs elected for United Future, none were from Outdoor Recreation.

In March 2006 the party split with United Future due to a dissatisfaction with the Christian evangelism within the party. ORNZ acting chairman Phil Hoare stating that: "We strongly believe in the traditional bedrock values of our nation's heritage but we also affirm the separation of church and state." [2]

In 2007, the party requested and received deregistration. [3]

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