Young New Zealand Party

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The Young New Zealand Party was a faction in the New Zealand Parliament in the 19th century. It predated the creation of political parties as they are understood today.

New Zealand Parliament legislative body of New Zealand

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Queen is usually represented by a governor-general. Before 1951, there was an upper chamber, the New Zealand Legislative Council. The Parliament was established in 1854 and is one of the oldest continuously functioning legislatures in the world.

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

The Young New Zealand Party was generally reformist in outlook, and would probably be considered left-wing in modern terms. It had connections to the labour movement (particularly miners), to small farmers, and to small businessmen. It was contrasted with another reformist faction, led by Julius Vogel, Robert Stout, and John Ballance. This group pursued a more academic type of reform, focused around socially liberal causes such as women's suffrage and Māori rights. Both groups were originally part of a government led by George Grey, but fractured after Grey's government was defeated.

The labour movement or labor movement consists of two main wings, the trade union movement or labor union movement, also called trade unionism or labor unionism on the one hand, and the political labour movement on the other.

Julius Vogel 8th Premier of New Zealand

Sir Julius Vogel was the eighth Premier of New Zealand. His administration is best remembered for the issuing of bonds to fund railway construction and other public works. He was the first Jewish prime minister of New Zealand. Historian Warwick R. Armstrong assesses Vogel's strengths and weaknesses:

Vogel's politics were like his nature, imaginative – and occasionally brilliant – but reckless and speculative. He was an excellent policymaker but he needed a strong leader to restrain him....Yet Vogel had vision. He saw New Zealand as a potential 'Britain of the South Seas', strong both in agriculture and in industry, and inhabited by a large and flourishing population.

Robert Stout New Zealand politician

Sir Robert Stout was a New Zealand politician who was the 13th Premier of New Zealand on two occasions in the late 19th century, and later Chief Justice of New Zealand. He was the only person to hold both these offices. He was noted for his support of liberal causes such as women's suffrage, and for his strong belief that philosophy and theory should always triumph over political expediency.

Key figures in the Young New Zealand Party were William Montgomery (the de facto leader), Richard Seddon, James McGowan, John McKenzie, Joseph Ward and William Hall-Jones. The group had no formal organisation, and had no membership or structure outside Parliament. [1]

William Montgomery (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

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Richard Seddon 15th and longest-serving Prime Minister of New Zealand

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James McGowan (politician) New Zealand politician

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Later, many of members of the Young New Zealand Party would, along with members of the other reformist faction, establish the Liberal Party. [1] Three members of the Young New Zealand Party, being Seddon, Ward, and Hall-Jones, would serve as Prime Minister.

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

Prime Minister of New Zealand head of the New Zealand government

The Prime Minister of New Zealand is the head of government of New Zealand. The incumbent Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, leader of the New Zealand Labour Party, took office on 26 October 2017.

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References

  1. 1 2 Foster, Bernard John (22 April 2009) [1966]. "LIBERAL PARTY". In McLintock, A. H. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand . Retrieved 10 April 2010.