New Zealand Sovereignty Party

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New Zealand Sovereignty Party registered logo NewZealandSovereigntyPartyLogo.jpg
New Zealand Sovereignty Party registered logo

The New Zealand Sovereignty Party was a political party in New Zealand. It was founded in 2010 by Southland businessman Tony Corbett. [1]

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

The party advocated repealing the 2007 anti-smacking law and the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme and free dental care for school children. It opposes mining in national parks and privatisation. [1]

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In June 2011 the party was conditionally awarded $20,000 of broadcasting funding for the 2011 election. [2] On 19 October its logo was registered with the Electoral Commission. [3]

The party stood two candidates in the 2011 election — Tony Corbett in Clutha-Southland [4] and Robert Piriniha Wilson in Te Tai Hauāuru [5] — and received 248 votes in total. [6] It did not stand any candidates at the 2014 election.

Clutha-Southland Current New Zealand electorate

Clutha-Southland is a parliamentary constituency returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Clutha Southland is Hamish Walker of the National Party. He has held the seat since the 2017 general election.

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Te Tai Hauāuru is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives, that was first formed for the 1996 election. The electorate was represented by Tariana Turia from 2002 to 2014, first for the Labour Party and then for the Māori Party. Turia retired and was succeeded in 2014 by Labour's Adrian Rurawhe who again retained the seat in 2017.

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References

  1. 1 2 "New party rises from heartland". Southland Times. 2010-06-18. Retrieved 2011-05-21.
  2. "2011 Broadcasting Allocation Decision Released". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2011-06-01. Retrieved 2011-09-22.
  3. "Registration of party logos". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2011-10-19. Retrieved 2011-10-19.
  4. "Information for Voters in Clutha-Southland". Elections New Zealand. 2 November 2011. Archived from the original on 16 October 2008.
  5. "Information for Voters in Te Tai Hauāuru". Elections New Zealand. 2 November 2011. Archived from the original on 16 October 2008.
  6. "2011 General Election: Summary of Overall Results". New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 2014-01-15.