NMP (political party)

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NMP was a political organisation in New Zealand. Several different meanings of the initials "NMP" have been given at different times - the more common definitions are "No More Parties", "No More Politics", and "New Millennium Partnership". The party went through several stages in the 1999 election, its platform drew on theories of the New Age movement, but by the 2002 election, it appears to have been captured by a group aiming for the radical reform of the New Zealand political system. As a result of its multiple incarnations, its policy focus was not well communicated. In the 2002 election, it received only 274 votes (0.01%) across New Zealand. [1] It never won any seats, and on 14 March 2003, the party was officially removed from the register of parties at its own request.

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References

  1. "Official Count Results -- Overall Status". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 7 August 2013.