Reform New Zealand

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Reform New Zealand was a centre-right liberal conservative or classical liberal political party in New Zealand. The party was established in 2011 by dissatisfied members of ACT New Zealand, and advocates of similar policies of low taxation, [1] privatisation, [2] and reduced government. [3] The party never registered on any opinion polls, named its party leadership, or confirmed its organisational details. While claiming that it planned to contest the 2011 election [4] it never attempted to register with the Electoral Commission and did not stand any candidates.

A political party is an organized group of people who have the same ideology, or who otherwise have the same political positions, and who field candidates for elections, in an attempt to get them elected and thereby implement the party's agenda.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. It has a total land area of 268,000 square kilometres (103,500 sq mi). New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

ACT New Zealand New Zealand political party

ACT New Zealand, usually known as ACT, is a right-wing, classical-liberal political party in New Zealand. According to former party leader Rodney Hide, ACT stands for "individual freedom, personal responsibility, doing the best for our natural environment and for smaller, smarter government in its goals of a prosperous economy, a strong society, and a quality of life that is the envy of the world".

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It listed its policies as opposition to the current Key administration's seabed and foreshore compromise legislation which was designed to placate National's alternative coalition partner, the Māori Party; restoration of the Employment Contracts Act anti-union industrial relations legislation of the nineties; climate change denial; and sharp reduction in public sector employment through asset sale privatisation, as well as reduction of social welfare expenditure.

Māori Party New Zealand political party promoting indigenous rights

The Māori Party is an indigenous rights-based centre-left political party in New Zealand. Tariana Turia founded the party in 2004 after resigning from the governing centre-left Labour Party, for whom she was a minister, over the foreshore and seabed ownership controversy. She and Pita Sharples, a high-profile academic, became the first co-leaders.

Climate change denial Denial, dismissal, or unwarranted doubt about the scientific consensus on the rate and extent of global warming

Climate change denial, or global warming denial is denial, dismissal, or unwarranted doubt that contradicts the scientific consensus on climate change, including the extent to which it is caused by humans, its impacts on nature and human society, or the potential of adaptation to global warming by human actions. Many who deny, dismiss, or hold unwarranted doubt about the scientific consensus on anthropogenic global warming self-label as "climate change skeptics", which several scientists have noted is an inaccurate description. Climate change denial can also be implicit, when individuals or social groups accept the science but fail to come to terms with it or to translate their acceptance into action. Several social science studies have analyzed these positions as forms of denialism, pseudoscience, or propaganda.

The public sector is the part of the economy composed of both public services and public enterprises.

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References

  1. "Taxation". Reform New Zealand. Archived from the original on 24 February 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  2. "State Asset Ownership". Reform New Zealand. Archived from the original on 24 February 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  3. "Introduction". Reform New Zealand. Archived from the original on 21 February 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  4. Cheng, Derek (18 February 2011). "New right-wing party now shopping round." New Zealand Herald. Accessed November 2011.