99 MP Party

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The 99 MP Party was a small New Zealand political party that contested the 2005 General Election. It supported a reduction of the number of Members of Parliament from 120 to 99.

New Zealand Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Contents

History

With the introduction of Mixed Member Proportional in 1996, the number of MPs rose from 99 to 120. Margaret Robertson organised a referendum in 1999 calling for the number to be reduced back to 99.

Electoral reform in New Zealand

Electoral reform in New Zealand has, in recent years, become a political issue as major changes have been made to both Parliamentary and local government electoral systems.

Local businessman Jack Yan proposed that Robertson's campaign be turned into a political party in 2001, a decision that she agreed to the following year after finding that most parties in Parliament generally did not support a reduction. Robertson took initial steps toward achieving the membership number required. Yan initially served as president and designed the logo and marketing collateral, but lived in Europe in the northern summer of 2002, became less involved on his return, and was replaced.

Jack Yan Hong Kong businessman

Jack Yan is a New Zealand publisher, designer and businessman, who has run several times for the post of Mayor of Wellington. He is best known as the organiser of the Miss Universe New Zealand beauty pageant.

The 2002 policies were centrist to conservative, including the toughening of the Crimes Act 1961 and reforming Parliament and the select committee structure. In addition to the reduction of MP numbers, the party also supports making referendums mandatory for all constitutional changes.

Crimes Act 1961

The Crimes Act 1961 is an Act of the Parliament of New Zealand that forms a leading part of the criminal law in New Zealand. It repeals the Crimes Act 1908, itself a successor of the Criminal Code Act 1893, and partially codifies the criminal law in New Zealand. Most crimes in New Zealand are created by the Crimes Act, but some are created elsewhere. All common law offences are abolished by section 9, as are all offences against Acts of the British Parliaments, but section 20 saves the old common law defences where they are not specifically altered.

The Electoral Commission accepted the party's official registration on 14 April 2005. It put forward a party list of two people: Robertson and Ramasmy Ramanathan.

2005 General Election and subsequent deregistration

In the 2005 elections, the 99 MP Party gained 0.03% of the vote. Shortly afterwards, Margaret Robertson announced plans to step down.

On 16 March 2006, the Parliament of New Zealand passed the first reading of New Zealand First MP Barbara Stewart's private members bill, to cut the number of MPs to 100. [1] A number of parties indicated though that their support was for it to go to select committee, at which public submissions could be heard. [2] However, but the bill was defeated at its Second Reading on 8 November 2006. As of 2017, the size of parliament remains at least 120.

New Zealand First, commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand. It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party. It has formed governments with both major parties in New Zealand: first with the National Party from 1996 to 1998, and then with the Labour Party from 2005 to 2008 and from 2017 to present.

Barbara Joy Stewart is a New Zealand politician. She is a member of the New Zealand First party.

In September 2006, the party was deregistered, having failed to provide evidence of the necessary 500 members.

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References

  1. "Bill to cut number of MPs passes hurdle". The New Zealand Herald . 16 March 2006. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  2. "Parliament to consider cutting number of MPs". The New Zealand Herald . 15 March 2006. Retrieved 15 September 2011.