New Zealand Republican Party (1995)

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The New Zealand Republican Party of 1995 was a political party which campaigned for the creation of a New Zealand republic as one of its main policies. It existed from 1995 to 2002.

Republicanism in New Zealand is a political position that holds that New Zealand's system of government should be changed from a constitutional monarchy to a republic.

Contents

Founding

The party was registered as an incorporated society on 24 January 1995 as "The Confederation of United Tribes of New Zealand Incorporated" but changed its name on 8 February 1995 to the New Zealand Republican Party. It was led by William Powell.

1996 election

Although the party was registered in time for the 1996 election, it was late in submitting its party list. The party challenged its exclusion as a result of failing to submit a list at the High Court of New Zealand, and attempted to have the 1996 elections postponed to allow this. Their application for an injunction was rejected however.

High Court of New Zealand Court in New Zealand

The High Court of New Zealand is the superior court of New Zealand. It has general jurisdiction and responsibility, under the Senior Courts Act 2016, as well as the High Court Rules 2016, for the administration of justice throughout New Zealand. There are 18 High Court locations throughout New Zealand, plus one stand-alone registry.

1999 election

In the 1999 election, the party submitted a list, but won only 0.01% (292 votes in total) [1] of the vote, the lowest of all registered parties. The party was officially de-registered on 24 June 2002., [2] just before the 2002 election

See also

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References

  1. "1999 election results". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 2008-01-18.
  2. "Political party registered logos". Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 2007-04-29. Retrieved 2008-01-18.