Internet Party and Mana Movement

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Internet Party and Mana Movement
Abbreviation Internet Mana
Co-Leaders Hone Harawira
Laila Harré
Founded May 2014
Dissolved 13 December 2014;3 years ago (13 December 2014)
Merger of Internet Party
Mana Movement
Ideology Collaborative e-democracy
Māori rights

The Internet Party and Mana Movement, also stylised as Internet Party and MANA Movement or simply Internet MANA, was a coalition of the Internet Party and the Mana Movement formed to contest the party vote in the 2014 New Zealand general election.

The term "coalition" is the denotation for a group formed when two or more people, factions, states, political parties, militaries etc. agree to work together temporarily in a partnership to achieve a common goal. The word coalition connotes a coming together to achieve a goal.

Internet Party (New Zealand)

The Internet Party is a political party in New Zealand that promotes Internet freedom and privacy. Founded in January 2014 with the support of Internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, the party contested the 2014 New Zealand election as part of an electoral alliance with the Mana Movement but failed to win any seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Internet Party contested the 2017 general election under the leadership of journalist Suzie Dawson but failed to win any seats.

The Mana Movement is a New Zealand political party led by Hone Harawira which was formed in April 2011, following his resignation from the Māori Party. Harawira won the by-election in Te Tai Tokerau of 25 June 2011 for the Mana Party, and retained the seat during the 2011 general election but lost it in 2014 and 2017 to Labour Party candidate, Kelvin Davis.

Contents

History

In May 2014, Internet Party chief executive Vikram Kumar and Mana Movement leader Hone Harawira announced a merger of the parties, to be known as the Internet Party and Mana Movement, or the abbreviated Internet Mana. Harawira is the founding leader of the party. [1] Mana member Sue Bradford resigned immediately after the merger was announced. [2] The party and its logo were registered with the New Zealand Electoral Commission on 24 July 2014, allowing the party to contest the party vote. [3]

Hone Harawira New Zealand politician

Hone Pani Tamati Waka Nene Harawira is a New Zealand Māori activist and former parliamentarian. He was elected to the New Zealand Parliament for the Māori electorate of Te Tai Tokerau in the 2005 general election as the Māori Party candidate. His resignation caused the Te Tai Tokerau by-election, held on 25 June 2011, which he won with a majority of 1117. As Leader of the Mana Movement and Member of Parliament for Te Tai Tokerau, he sat on the front bench in the New Zealand House of Representatives until losing the seat in the 2014 general election.

Sue Bradford New Zealand politician

Sue Bradford is a New Zealand activist, academic, and former New Zealand politician who served as a list Member of Parliament representing the Green Party from 1999 to 2009.

Electoral Commission (New Zealand) crown entity administering elections in New Zealand

The Electoral Commission is an independent Crown entity set up by the New Zealand Parliament. It is responsible for the administration of parliamentary elections and referenda, promoting compliance with electoral laws, servicing the work of the Representation Commission, and the provision of advice, reports and public education on electoral matters. The Commission also assists electoral agencies of other countries on a reciprocal basis with their electoral events.

The Internet Party and Mana Movement contested the 2014 general election as a single entity. The memorandum of understanding between the Mana Movement and Internet Party gave the Mana Movement first, third and fourth places on the combined party list, while the Internet Party took second, fifth and sixth places. Subsequent places on the party list alternate between the two component parties. Electorate candidates stood as members of their respective parties rather than Internet Party and Mana Movement. [1] [ better source needed ] The memorandum of understanding states that the agreement would remain in force until at least six weeks after polling day. The two component parties agreed to review their arrangement within five weeks of the election. [1]

The Internet Party and Mana Movement was funded by online millionaire Kim Dotcom. It failed to win a seat in parliament. Dotcom, who was not a candidate because he is not a New Zealand citizen, [4] told reporters as election results became clear, "I take full responsibility for this loss tonight because the brand—the brand Kim Dotcom—was poison for what we were trying to achieve." [5]

Kim Dotcom German-Finnish Internet entrepreneur

Kim Dotcom, also known as Kimble and Kim Tim Jim Vestor, is a German-Finnish Internet entrepreneur and political activist who resides in Queenstown, New Zealand. He first rose to fame in Germany in the 1990s as an Internet entrepreneur.

Following post-election reviews by both components of the Internet Mana Movement, the relationship was dissolved on 13 December with both sides agreeing there had been 'no regrets' about the decision made to run together. [6] With the dissolution several members in the leadership of the Internet Party choose to step down from their leadership positions and the composite party are now in state of restructuring their engagement with members and supporters.

Electoral results

Stage at an Internet MANA rally Internet Mana Party Tour 4 August 2014 02.JPG
Stage at an Internet MANA rally
Election # of party votes % of party vote # of seats
won
Government/opposition?
2014 [7] 34,094 1.42
0 / 121
Unelected

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Memorandum of Understanding between the MANA Movement and the Internet Party". 25 May 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  2. Martin, Matthew (28 May 2014). "Mana merger 'slap in the face'". Rotorua Daily Post. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  3. "Registration of Internet Party and MANA Movement logo". Electoral Commission. 24 July 2014. Retrieved 8 August 2014.
  4. New Zealand's National Party wins re-election, BBC News, 20 September 2014
  5. New Zealand's Ruling National Party Is Re-elected, The New York Times, 20 September 2014
  6. "Sound file" (MP3). Podcast.radionz.co.nz. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  7. "Official Count Results – Overall Status (2014)". Elections New Zealand. Retrieved 21 January 2016.