Green Society

Last updated
New Zealand Green Society logo NewZealandGreenSocietyLogo.png
New Zealand Green Society logo

The Green Society was a small New Zealand political party dedicated to environmentalism. It was one of three environmentalist parties involved in the 1996 election, the others being the Green Party (then part of the Alliance) and the Progressive Green Party. The Green Society believed that environmentalism should be the sole and exclusive focus of any "green" party, and that both of the other groups were in error in their attempts to lay out social and economic policies as well.[ citation needed ] The party was led by Simon Reeves, an environmental lawyer, who contested the Auckland Central electorate. [1] The party contested eight electorates as well as the party list, but gained only 1,140 electorate and 2,363 list votes (0.11%), failing to win any seats. [2]

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

Environmentalism broad philosophy, ideology and social movement

Environmentalism or environmental rights is a broad philosophy, ideology, and social movement regarding concerns for environmental protection and improvement of the health of the environment, particularly as the measure for this health seeks to incorporate the impact of changes to the environment on humans, animals, plants and non-living matter. While environmentalism focuses more on the environmental and nature-related aspects of green ideology and politics, ecology combines the ideology of social ecology and environmentalism. Ecology is more commonly used in continental European languages while ‘environmentalism’ is more commonly used in English but the words have slightly different connotations.

The party did not contest the 1999 election and was deregistered in February 2001. [3]

Related Research Articles

The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a left-wing political party in New Zealand. Like many Green parties around the world it has four organisational pillars: ecology, social responsibility, grassroots democracy, and nonviolence.

1996 New Zealand general election

The 1996 New Zealand general election was held on 12 October 1996 to determine the composition of the 45th New Zealand Parliament. It was notable for being the first election to be held under the new mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, and produced a parliament considerably more diverse than previous elections. It saw the National Party, led by Jim Bolger, retain its position in government, but only after protracted negotiations with the smaller New Zealand First party to form a coalition. New Zealand First's position as "kingmaker", able to place either of the two major parties into government, was a significant election outcome.

1993 New Zealand general election

The 1993 New Zealand general election was held on 6 November 1993 to determine the composition of the 44th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the governing National Party, led by Jim Bolger, win a second term in office, despite a major swing away from National in both seats and votes. The opposition Labour Party, despite a slight drop in their support, managed to make gains in terms of seats. The new Alliance and New Zealand First parties gained significant shares of the vote, but won few seats. The election was New Zealand's last under the non-proportional first past the post electoral system.

Margaret Ann Hartley, known as Ann Hartley, is a former New Zealand member of parliament, a former Mayor of North Shore City, and a member of the Labour Party.

Ann Batten is an Anglican priest, peace activist and a former New Zealand politician. She has been a member of various political parties and represented New Zealand First and Mauri Pacific in Parliament.

Peter Malcolm Hilt is a former New Zealand politician.

Suzanne Mary Sinclair is a former New Zealand politician of the Labour Party.

2008 New Zealand general election election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand parliament. The conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked an end to nine years of Labour Party government, and the beginning of the Fifth National Government of New Zealand which would govern for 9 years, until its loss to the Labour Party in the 2017 general election.

Maungakiekie (New Zealand electorate)

Maungakiekie is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Maungakiekie is Denise Lee of the National Party. The name is from Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill, a large and symbolically important hill at the western end of the seat; the name denotes the presence of kiekie vines on the hill.

Auckland Central (New Zealand electorate)

Auckland Central is a New Zealand electoral division returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. Its current representative is Nikki Kaye, a member of the National Party; she has represented the seat since 2008.

Bay of Plenty (New Zealand electorate) electorate in New Zealand

Bay of Plenty is a New Zealand electoral division returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current representative is Todd Muller of the National Party, first elected at the 2014 election. He replaced Tony Ryall, also of the National Party, who retired after representing the seat since 1996.

Epsom (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Epsom is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. As of the 2017 general election, its member of parliament is David Seymour.

Manurewa (New Zealand electorate) New Zealand electorate

Manurewa is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate in southern Auckland. Louisa Wall has represented the electorate since the 2011 election.

Mount Albert (New Zealand electorate) New Zealand Parliamentary electorate

Mount Albert is a parliamentary electorate in Auckland, New Zealand, returning one Member of Parliament (MP) to the New Zealand House of Representatives. It was represented by David Shearer from 13 June 2009 to 31 December 2016. It was represented by Helen Clark from the 1981 general election until her resignation from Parliament on 17 April 2009. It has elected only Labour Party MPs since it was first contested at the 1946 election. The current representative is the Prime Minister and Labour Party leader, Jacinda Ardern, who was elected in a 2017 by-election gaining 77 percent of votes cast in the preliminary results.

New Lynn (New Zealand electorate)

New Lynn is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. Deborah Russell of the Labour Party has represented the electorate since the 2017 general election.

Northcote (New Zealand electorate) New Zealand parliamentary electorate

Northcote is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. Currently, the MP for Northcote is Dan Bidois of the National Party, who won the seat at the Northcote by-election.

Pakuranga (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Pakuranga is a New Zealand Parliamentary electorate. It gave the Social Credit Party one of its few MPs when Neil Morrison held the seat from 1984 to 1987, but otherwise the electorate seat has been held by the National Party since 1972. Its current MP is Simeon Brown who has held the electorate since the 2017 general election.

Wellington Central (New Zealand electorate) Current New Zealand electorate

Wellington Central is an electorate, represented by a Member of Parliament in the New Zealand House of Representatives. Its MP since November 2008 has been Labour Party's Grant Robertson.

Candidates in the 2008 New Zealand general election by electorate

Seventy of the one hundred and twenty members of the New Zealand House of Representatives elected in New Zealand's 2008 general election will be from single member constituencies, an increase of one electorate seat from 2005. The initial composition of the 2005 Parliament gave the Labour and National parties each 31 constituencies, the Māori Party four and ACT, United Future and the Progressive Party one each.

2014 New Zealand general election

The 2014 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.

References

  1. "Auckland Central 03" (PDF). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. pp. 3–4. Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  2. "Part I: Summary of Party List and Electorate Candidate Seats" (PDF). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 2007. Retrieved 29 June 2008.
  3. "Political party registered logos". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 16 January 2007. Archived from the original on 14 October 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2008.