Socialist Party of Aotearoa

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Socialist Party of Aotearoa
LeaderBrendan Tuohy
SecretaryWarren Brewer [1] [2]
Founder G. H. Andersen
Founded1990
Split from Socialist Unity Party of New Zealand [3]
Preceded by Socialist Unity Party, Communist Party of New Zealand
Headquarters Lyttelton, Canterbury [4]
Ideology Communism
Marxism-Leninism [5] [6]
International affiliation International Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties
ColoursRed
House of Representatives
0 / 121
Local Government [7]
0 / 1,626
Website
www.socialistparty.org.nz

The Socialist Party of Aotearoa was a minor political party in New Zealand. It was formed in 1990 [1] [8] through a split in the Socialist Unity Party, led by G. H. (Bill) Andersen. [3] [9] The last known leader of the party was Brendan Tuohy. [1] [2]

Contents

The party published a monthly newspaper called Red Flag. [10] [11] It operates the Workers' Institute of Scientific Socialist Education (WISSE). [12] [13]

The party is best known through the influence of its late founder Bill Andersen, a well-known trade unionist who served as president of the Auckland Trades Council, national secretary of the Socialist Unity Party, and president of the National Distribution Union. [9] [14]

It did not stand any candidates at the 2014 election.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Socialist Party of Aotearoa website. Socialist Party of Aotearoa. Retrieved 12 July 2013, from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. 1 2 "Greetings from the Socialist Party of Aotearoa (New Zealand)". Communist Party USA . Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  3. 1 2 Pacey, quoted in Locke, C. (2012, p. 239). Workers in the Margins: Union Radicals in Post-war New Zealand. Wellington: Bridget Williams Books.
  4. Socialist Party of Aotearoa. Membership form. Retrieved 12 July 2013, from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 August 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  5. Marxist-Leninist Collective. (March 1997). These Marxist Principles Cannot be Destroyed People's Voice. Retrieved from .
  6. Socialist Party of Aotearoa. About. Retrieved on 12 July 2013, from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 August 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  7. Paulin, Judy (June 2008). "Representation process: A desktop review" (PDF). Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  8. Andersen, G. H. (1990). The 1990 general elections and beyond. Auckland: Socialist Party of Aotearoa.
  9. 1 2 Pickmere, Arnold (21 January 2005). "Obituary: Bill Andersen". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  10. Andersen, Bill (15 December 2001). "The red flag keeps flying". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  11. Red Flag. (October 2002). Subscribe to Red Flag. Red Flag., p. 12.
  12. Loudon, Trevor (2 May 2009). "Cuba's Kiwi Fifth Column" . Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  13. WISSE. WISSE website. Retrieved on 12 July 2013, from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 5 February 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  14. Verran, D. (2005). Gordon Harold (Bill) Andersen. Retrieved from