New Zealand Liberal Party (1962)

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New Zealand Liberal Party
Founded 1962
Ideology Classical Liberalism
Laissez-faire
Political position Centre-right
Colours     Yellow

The New Zealand Liberal Party of 1962, a defunct laissez-faire Liberal Party, was formed to stand candidates in the 1963 New Zealand general election.

Laissez-faire is an economic system in which transactions between private parties are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies. The phrase laissez-faire is part of a larger French phrase and literally translates to "let (it/them) do", but in this context usually means "let go".

History

At the election, "the Liberals, with over twenty candidates, collected only 1 per cent of the vote, although they caused the National Party a little concern by drawing financial support from some farmers in Canterbury." [1] The Liberal Party argued the National government was not doing enough to promote private enterprise, but made little influence on the election and did not fulfill expectations that they would split the National Party's vote. [2]

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Second National Government of New Zealand

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The number of candidates put forward was 23, and they attracted 10,339 votes (0.9%). The electorates were: Auckland Central, Awarua, Eastern Maori, Eden, Hamilton, Hauraki, Invercargill, Mount Albert, North Shore, Onehunga, Otaki, Palmerston North, Piako, Raglan, Remuera, Roskill, Selwyn, Tamaki, Waimarino, Waipa, Waitakere, Waitomo and Wallace. The highest number of votes for any Liberal candidate was Invercargill (1,064 votes), then Wallace (828 votes). [3]

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Auckland Central is a New Zealand electoral division returning one member to the New Zealand House of Representatives. Its current representative is Nikki Kaye, a member of the National Party; she has represented the seat since 2008.

Awarua was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate from 1881 to 1996.

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Eden, a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate, lay in the general area of the suburb of Mount Eden in the city of Auckland.

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References

  1. Milne, Robert Stephen (1966). Political Parties in New Zealand. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press. pp. 66–67.
  2. Gustafson, Barry (1986). The First 50 Years : A History of the New Zealand National Party . Auckland: Reed Methuen. p. 90. ISBN   0-474-00177-6.
  3. Norton, Clifford (1988). New Zealand Parliamentary Election Results 1946-1987: Occasional Publications No 1, Department of Political Science. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington. ISBN   0-475-11200-8.