Invercargill (New Zealand electorate)

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Invercargill electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election Invercargill electorate, 2014.svg
Invercargill electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Invercargill is an electorate of the New Zealand Parliament that has existed since 1866. Since the 2014 election, the electorate's representative is Sarah Dowie of the National Party.

New Zealand Parliament legislative body of New Zealand

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Queen is usually represented by her governor-general. Before 1951, there was an upper chamber, the New Zealand Legislative Council. The New Zealand Parliament was established in 1854 and is one of the oldest continuously functioning legislatures in the world. It has met in Wellington, the capital of New Zealand, since 1865.

2014 New Zealand general election

The 2014 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.

Sarah Dowie New Zealand politician

Sarah Maree Dowie is a New Zealand politician who was elected to the New Zealand parliament at the 2014 general election as a representative of the New Zealand National Party and holds the Invercargill seat.

Contents

Population centres

The electorate covers Invercargill city and the surrounding rural area, including Stewart Island / Rakiura. In 1996 a boundary redistribution resulted in the abolition of the Awarua electorate and merged with Invercargill following re-drawing of boundaries due to the introduction of mixed-member proportional voting (MMP). Minor but steady population decline in the Southland region has generally resulted in Invercargill expanding northwards. The 2013 redistribution, however, has left Invercargill unchanged. [1]

Invercargill City in South Island, New Zealand

Invercargill is the southernmost and westernmost city in New Zealand, and one of the southernmost cities in the world. It is the commercial centre of the Southland region. The city lies in the heart of the wide expanse of the Southland Plains on the Oreti or New River some 18 km north of Bluff, which is the southernmost town in the South Island. It sits amid rich farmland that is bordered by large areas of conservation land and marine reserves, including Fiordland National Park covering the south-west corner of the South Island and the Catlins coastal region.

Awarua was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate from 1881 to 1996.

Mixed-member proportional (MMP) representation is a mixed electoral system in which voters get two votes: one to decide the representative for their single-seat constituency, and one for a political party. Seats in the legislature are filled firstly by the successful constituency candidates, and secondly, by party candidates based on the percentage of nationwide or region-wide votes that each party received. The constituency representatives are elected using first-past-the-post voting (FPTP) or another plurality/majoritarian system. The nationwide or region-wide party representatives are, in most jurisdictions, drawn from published party lists, similar to party-list proportional representation. To gain a nationwide representative, parties may be required to achieve a minimum number of constituency candidates, a minimum percentage of the nationwide party vote, or both.

History

The electorate was established in 1866 when it separated from the Wallace electorate. [2]

Wallace was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was established in 1858, the first election held in 1859, and existed until 1996. For a time, it was represented by two members. In total, there were 18 Members of Parliament from the Wallace electorate.

The first representative was William Wood, who won the 1866 election. [3] Wood retired at the end of the parliamentary term in 1870. William Henderson Calder succeeded Wood in the 1871 election and he resigned in March 1873. [4] The resulting 1873 by-election was won by John Cuthbertson, who served until the end of the parliamentary term in 1875. [5]

William Wood (New Zealand politician) 19th-century New Zealand politician

William Wood was a 19th-century New Zealand politician.

1866 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between 12 February and 6 April to elect 70 MPs to the fourth term of the New Zealand Parliament.

William Henderson Calder was a 19th-century Member of Parliament in Invercargill, New Zealand.

Cuthbertson was defeated by George Lumsden in the 1875 election. Lumsden resigned in June 1878, [6] which caused the 1878 by-election. Henry Feldwick was the successful candidate and he commenced his first of three terms for the electorate. [7] At the 1879 election, Feldwick was defeated by James Walker Bain, who retired at the end of the parliamentary term in 1881. [8] At the 1881 election, Feldwick was again the successful candidate, [7] only to be defeated again at the 1884 election, on that occasion by Joseph Hatch. [9] At the 1887 election, Feldwick defeated Hatch and commenced his third and final term for the Invercargill electorate, serving until the end of the parliamentary term in 1890. [7]

George Lumsden New Zealand politician

George Lumsden was a 19th-century New Zealand politician.

1875–76 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1875–76 was held between 20 December 1875 and 29 January 1876 to elect a total of 88 MPs in 73 electorates to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. The Māori vote was held on 4 and 15 January 1876. A total of 56,471 voters were registered.

1878 Invercargill by-election New Zealand by-election

The 1878 Invercargill by-election was a by-election during the 6th New Zealand Parliament in the Southland electorate of Invercargill. The by-election occurred following the resignation of MP George Lumsden and was won by Henry Feldwick.

James Whyte Kelly defeated Feldwick in the 1890 election. Kelly became a member of the Liberal Party and served for three parliamentary terms, [7] but broke away from the Liberal Party and became an Independent Liberal in 1895. [10] For the 1899 election, the Josiah Hanan of the Liberal Party challenged Kelly, with Hanan being successful. [11] Hanan served the electorate until 1925, when he retired. [12]

James Whyte Kelly was a 19th-century New Zealand politician, initially of the Liberal Party but later an Independent Liberal.

1890 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1890 was one of New Zealand's most significant. It marked the beginning of party politics in New Zealand with the formation of the Liberal Government, which was to enact major welfare, labour and electoral reforms, including giving the vote to women.

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

The 1925 election was narrowly won by the former Prime Minister Sir Joseph Ward standing for the Liberal Party, who beat James Hargest of the Reform Party with 4957 votes to 4798; a third contender, Patrick Hickey, stood for the Labour Party. [13] Until 1919, Ward had for many years represented Awarua. [14] Ward, a former leader of the Liberal Party, contested the election under the "Liberal" label, despite the fact that the remnants of the Liberal Party were now calling themselves by different names. [15] In 1928, Ward helped form the United Party [15] and won the 1928 election. [14] He died on 8 July 1930, [15] which caused the 1930 by-election won by his son Vincent Ward, who retired at the end of the parliamentary term in 1931. [14]

Vincent Ward was succeeded by James Hargest in the 1931 election. At the end of the parliamentary term in 1935, Hargest successfully contested the Awarua electorate. [14] He was succeeded in the Invercargill electorate by William Denham of the Labour Party, who held the electorate for three terms from 1935 [16] until his defeat in the 1946 election by Ralph Hanan of the National Party. [12] Hanan was re-elected seven times and died in office on 24 July 1969; the need to hold a by-election before the general election on 29 November was avoided by a special act, the By-election Postponement Act 1969.

The successful candidate in the 1969 general election was John Chewings, who was defeated at the end of the parliamentary term at the 1972 election by Labour's J. B. Munro. At the next election in 1975, Munro was in turn beaten by National's Norman Jones. Jones retired at the end of his fourth term in August 1987 and died shortly thereafter on 19 November. [17]

Jones was succeeded by National's Rob Munro in the 1987 election. Munro served two parliamentary terms before being beaten by Labour's Mark Peck in the 1993 election. Peck retired after four parliamentary terms in 2005 and was succeeded by National's Eric Roy in the 2005 election. Roy retired after three parliamentary terms and was succeeded in 2014 by Sarah Dowie. [18]

Members of Parliament

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Liberal–Labour   

  United     Labour     National     NZ First   

ElectionWinner
1866 election William Wood
1871 election William Henderson Calder
1873 by-election John Cuthbertson
1875 election George Lumsden
1878 by-election Henry Feldwick
1879 election James Walker Bain
1881 election Henry Feldwick (2nd time)
1884 election Joseph Hatch
1887 election Henry Feldwick (3rd time)
1890 election James Whyte Kelly
1893 election
1896 election
1899 election Josiah Hanan
1902 election
1905 election
1908 election
1911 election
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election Joseph Ward
1928 election
1930 by-election Vincent Ward
1931 election James Hargest
1935 election William Denham
1938 election
1943 election
1946 election Ralph Hanan
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election
1957 election
1960 election
1963 election
1966 election
1969 election John Chewings
1972 election J. B. Munro
1975 election Norman Jones
1978 election
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election Rob Munro
1990 election
1993 election Mark Peck
1996 election
1999 election
2002 election
2005 election Eric Roy
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election Sarah Dowie
2017 election

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Invercargill electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
1996 election Eric Roy
1999 election
2005 Lesley Soper [lower-alpha 1]
2007
2015 Ria Bond [lower-alpha 2]
2017 election Liz Craig

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Invercargill [19]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Sarah Dowie 18,10251.05−0.4317,41448.39−0.87
Labour Liz Craig 12,52335.31+5.8112,89135.82+10.86
NZ First Ria Bond 3,2149.06+1.643,1398.72−2.39
Green Rochelle Surendran1,6234.58−2.751,1663.24−4.29
Opportunities  7602.11
Legalise Cannabis  1410.39−0.26
Ban 1080  1030.29−0.21
ACT  950.26−0.07
Conservative  790.22−3.45
Māori  730.20−0.12
Democrats  430.12−0.16
United Future  270.08−0.12
Outdoors  230.06
People's Party  210.06
Internet  90.03−0.58 [lower-alpha 3]
Mana  60.02−0.59 [lower-alpha 4]
Informal votes445163
Total Valid votes35,46235,990
Turnout 36,153
National holdMajority5,57915.73−6.25

2014 election

2014 general election: Invercargill [20]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Sarah Dowie 17,52651.48−3.1016,88049.26−0.62
Labour Lesley Soper 10,04429.50−5.298,55324.96−3.77
NZ First Ria Bond [lower-alpha 2] 2,5267.42+7.423,80611.11+4.27
Green David Kennedy2,4977.33−0.362,5817.53−0.89
Conservative Laura Storr7192.11+2.111,2563.67+2.68
Democrats Stephnie de Ruyter 3330.98−0.67950.28−0.12
Legalise Cannabis  2240.65−0.14
Internet Mana  2100.61+0.42 [lower-alpha 5]
Ban 1080  1730.50−0.32
ACT  1130.33−0.90
Māori  1100.32−0.18
United Future  680.20−0.62
Civilian  230.07+0.07
Independent Coalition  110.03+0.03
Focus  100.03+0.03
Informal votes400153
Total Valid votes34,04534,266
Turnout 34,29276.48+4.60
National holdMajority7,48221.98+2.19

2011 election

2011 general election: Invercargill [21]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Eric Roy 17,27554.58-1.3916,14049.88+2.35
Labour Lesley Soper 11,01234.79-1.969,29628.73-8.15
Green David Kennedy2,4337.69+2.732,7238.42+4.16
Democrats Stephnie de Ruyter 5211.65+1.651290.40+0.22
ACT Ian Carline2760.87-0.333971.23-1.47
Libertarianz Shane Pleasance1330.42+0.04340.11+0.05
NZ First  2,2136.84+3.44
Conservative  6431.99+1.99
United Future  2640.82-0.09
Legalise Cannabis  2570.79+0.28
Māori  1620.50-0.08
Mana  630.19+0.19
Alliance  340.11-0.05
Informal votes863324
Total Valid votes31,65032,355
National holdMajority6,26319.790.58

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 45,014 [22]

2008 election

2008 general election: Invercargill [23]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Eric Roy 19,41455.97+6.4616,66347.54+8.05
Labour Lesley Soper 12,75036.76-6.2212,92736.88-8.30
Green Craig Carson1,7184.95+2.071,4924.26+1.18
ACT Ian Carline4161.20+0.069472.70+1.55
United Future Maureen Smith2580.74-0.703190.91-2.31
Libertarianz Shane Pleasance1310.38210.06+0.03
NZ First  1,1923.40-1.41
Bill and Ben  4131.18
Progressive  2920.83-0.39
Māori  2050.58+0.25
Legalise Cannabis  1790.51+0.21
Family Party  1450.41
Kiwi  1050.30
Democrats  610.17-0.02
Alliance  540.15+0.08
Pacific  180.05
Workers Party  140.04
RONZ  40.01-0.00
RAM  10.00
Informal votes338143
Total Valid votes34,68735,052
National holdMajority6,66419.21+12.69

2005 election

2005 general election: Invercargill [24]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Eric Roy 15,57049.5112,55939.49
Labour Wayne Harpur13,51842.9814,36945.18
Green Craig Carson9062.889803.08
United Future Ralph Kennard4531.41,0243.22
ACT Ian Beker3581.143651.15
Progressive Heka Taefu2310.733881.22
Democrats Bruce Stirling1870.59630.20
Māori Gina Haremate-Crawford1630.521060.33
Direct Democracy Craig Guy650.21110.03
NZ First  1,5304.81
Destiny  1880.59
Legalise Cannabis  960.30
Christian Heritage  560.19
Alliance  220.07
One NZ  130.04
Family Rights  110.03
Libertarianz  100.03
99 MP  90.03
RONZ  50.02
Informal votes316111
Total Valid votes31,45131,805
National gain from Labour Majority2,0526.52

2002 election

2002 general election: Invercargill
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Mark Peck 14,54848.77-8.3114,08946.73+1.80
National Eric Roy 11,75639.41+7.718,02126.60-3.32
Progressive Stephnie de Ruyter 1,0063.37-1.61 [lower-alpha 6] 7602.52
Green Craig Carson9633.23+1.041,2984.30+1.22
United Future Vince Smith8062.701,8516.14
ACT Peter Phiskie3131.051,0733.56+0.23
Christian Heritage Mervyn Lemuel Clayton2350.793011.00-1.63
Alliance Anna McMartin2020.682410.80-9.11
NZ First  1,8386.10+3.33
ORNZ  4441.47
Legalise Cannabis  2190.73-0.45
One NZ  140.05+0.01
Mana Māori  20.01-0.02
NMP  10.000.00
Informal votes296108
Total Valid votes29,82930,152
Labour holdMajority2,7929.36-16.02

1999 election

1999 general election: Invercargill
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Mark Peck 17,97057.08+8.2514,19644.93+11.69
National Eric Roy 9,98031.70-3.699,45329.92-4.34
Alliance Stephnie de Ruyter 1,5674.983,1329.91+0.15
Green Craig William Carson6892.199743.08
Christian Heritage Russell Zwies5361.708322.63
NZ First Allan Wise4881.558752.77-9.12
ACT Matt McInnes2510.801,0513.33+0.41
Legalise Cannabis  3721.18-0.47
Future NZ  2450.78
South Island  1570.50
Libertarianz  920.29+0.26
United NZ  860.27-0.21
Animals First  440.14-0.01
McGillicuddy Serious  440.14-0.19
Natural Law  130.04-0.12
One NZ  130.04
Mana Māori  80.03+0.02
People's Choice  50.02
Mauri Pacific  20.01
Freedom Movement  10.00
NMP  00.00
Republican  00.00
Informal votes431317
Total Valid votes31,48131,595
Labour holdMajority7,99125.38+11.94

1996 election

1996 general election: Invercargill [25] [26] [27]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Mark Peck 15,38348.8310,50233.24
National Red x.svgN Eric Roy 11,14835.3910,82534.26
NZ First Owen Horton2,3027.313,75711.89
Alliance Bruce Stirling1,5364.883,0839.76
ACT Louis Crimp4411.409212.92
Independent Philip Jones2940.93
McGillicuddy Serious Anthony Hobbs2000.631050.33
United NZ Stuart Jordan1110.351530.48
Natural Law Jacque Hughes870.28490.16
Christian Coalition  1,4954.73
Legalise Cannabis  5211.65
Progressive Green  600.19
Animals First  470.15
Green Society  260.08
Conservatives  140.04
Superannuitants & Youth  110.03
Libertarianz  80.03
Advance New Zealand 60.02
Mana Māori  40.01
Te Tawharau 40.01
Asia Pacific United 20.01
Ethnic Minority Party 10.00
Informal votes207115
Total Valid votes31,50231,594
Labour holdMajority4,23513.44

1993 election

1993 general election: Invercargill [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mark Peck 8,477 43.66
National Rob Munro 7,30337.61-9.05
Alliance Cecily Treweek2,25011.58+8.72
Independent Philip Jones7023.61
NZ First K Kawe3932.02
Christian Heritage H Macann2421.24
Natural Law Rhonda-Lisa Comins480.24
Majority1,1746.04
Turnout 19,41584.29+0.02
Registered electors 23,033

1990 election

1990 general election: Invercargill [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Rob Munro 10,727 46.66 -2.06
Labour B G Rait6,59028.66
NewLabour J Moore7463.24
Democrats Cecily Treweek6592.86-5.82
Social Credit H M Thompson3341.45
Legalise Marijuana K Dreaver3191.38
Majority4,13717.99+15.34
Turnout 19,37584.27-6.17
Registered electors 22,989

1987 election

1987 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Rob Munro 10,115 48.72
Labour Dougal Soper9,56346.06+5.29
Democrats Cecily Treweek1,8038.68
Majority5522.65
Turnout 20,76190.44-3.36
Registered electors 22,955

1984 election

1984 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Norman Jones 9,805 46.89 +1.26
Labour Dougal Soper8,52640.77+2.91
NZ Party Maurice Coughlan1,7218.23
Social Credit Joe Radich8013.83-12.67
Independent G J Gilbert560.26
Majority1,2796.11+1.65
Turnout 20,90993.80+2.58
Registered electors 22,291

1981 election

1981 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Norman Jones 9,350 45.63 -2.33
Labour Dougal Soper7,75837.86
Social Credit Joe Radich3,38216.50+2.71
Majority1,5927.76+6.49
Turnout 20,49091.22+16.45
Registered electors 22,460

1978 election

1978 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Norman Jones 8,666 43.30 -9.28
Labour Aubrey Begg 8,41042.02
Social Credit Joe Radich2,76013.79
Values R J Thomson1750.87
Majority2561.27-12.44
Turnout 20,01174.77-11.06
Registered electors 26,762

1975 election

1975 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Norman Jones 9,713 52.58
Labour J. B. Munro 7,18038.87-9.81
Social Credit N G Green1,0455.65
Values Malcolm Blair5332.88
Majority2,53313.71
Turnout 18,47185.83-6.33
Registered electors 21,518

1972 election

1972 general election: Invercargill [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour J. B. Munro 8,125 48.68
National John Chewings 7,36044.09-3.74
Social Credit M L Patterson8555.12
Independent Labour W F Manson2511.50
Liberal Reform H W I Le Page600.35
New Democratic J Murphy390.23
Majority7654.58
Turnout 16,69092.16+3.77
Registered electors 18,108

1969 election

1969 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National John Chewings 7,699 47.83
Labour T D Young6,66841.42
Social Credit D L Steele1,72810.73+6.15
Majority1,0316.40
Turnout 16,09588.39+2.78
Registered electors 18,209

1966 election

1966 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 7,626 49.30 -0.87
Labour Noel Valentine5,23033.81
Social Credit D L Steele2,61116.88+11.69
Majority2,39615.49+3.18
Turnout 15,46785.61-4.40
Registered electors 18,066

1963 election

1963 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 7,879 50.17 -4.18
Labour O J Henderson5,94537.85-3.62
Liberal Ronald MacGregor Hutton-Potts1,0646.77
Social Credit D L Steele8155.19+1.02
Majority1,93412.31+0.56
Turnout 15,70390.01+0.74
Registered electors 17,445

1960 election

1960 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 8,128 54.35 +4.34
Labour O J Henderson6,20241.47
Social Credit D L Steele6244.17
Majority1,92612.87+8.39
Turnout 14,95489.27-3.75
Registered electors 16,751

1957 election

1957 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 7,577 50.01 +6.25
Labour Thomas Francis Doyle 6,89845.53
Social Credit L G Russell6734.44-14.87
Majority6794.48-2.37
Turnout 15,14893.02+2.65
Registered electors 16,284

1954 election

1954 general election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 6,020 43.76 -13.66
Labour William Denham 5,07736.91
Social Credit L G Russell2,65719.31
Majority9436.85-8.00
Turnout 13,75490.37+0.69
Registered electors 15,218

1951 election

1951 General election: Invercargill [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 8,208 57.42 +3.47
Labour F G Spurdle6,08542.57
Majority2,12314.85+6.94
Turnout 14,29389.68-5.27
Registered electors 15,937

1949 election

1949 general election: Invercargill [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 7,897 53.95 +3.18
Labour William Denham 6,73846.04-3.18
Majority1,1597.91+6.36
Turnout 14,63594.95+0.86
Registered electors 15,412

1946 election

1946 general election, 1946: Invercargill [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Ralph Hanan 7,315 50.77
Labour William Denham 7,09149.22-2.12
Majority2241.55
Turnout 14,40694.09-3.34
Registered electors 15,310

1943 election

1943 general election: Invercargill [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Denham 7,442 51.34 -5.42
National William Bell6,43544.40
Democratic Labour L. Assheton Harbord5233.60
Informal votes1130.77+0.40
Majority1,0076.94-8.17
Turnout 14,49397.43+1.47
Registered electors 14,874

1938 election

1938 general election: Invercargill [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Denham 8,094 56.76 +26.21
National Fred Hall-Jones 5,93841.64
Independent George Edward Thompson Dorman1741.22
Informal votes540.37-0.29
Majority2,15615.11+12.54
Turnout 14,26095.96+1.28
Registered electors 14,860

1935 election

1935 general election: Invercargill [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour William Denham 4,241 31.55 +4.98
Democrat Gordon Reed3,89528.98
Reform John Miller2,70820.15
Independent Liberal William McChesney2,59519.30-15.30
Informal votes900.660.35
Majority3462.57
Turnout 13,43994.68+7.16
Registered electors 14,194

1931 election

1931 general election: Invercargill [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent James Hargest 4,652 38.84 -8.25
United William McChesney4,14434.60
Labour William Denham 3,18226.57
Majority5084.24-1.58
Informal votes370.31+0.05
Turnout 12,01587.52+8.02
Registered electors 13,729

1930 by-election

1930 Invercargill by-election [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
United Vincent Ward 5,194 52.91
Reform James Hargest 4,62347.09
Majority5715.82
Informal votes250.25-0.51
Turnout 9,84279.50-13.62
Registered electors 12,380

1928 election

1928 general election: Invercargill [39] [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
United Joseph Ward 7,309 63.89 +16.98
Reform Morell Macalister4,13136.11
Majority3,17827.78+26.27
Informal votes880.76+0.25
Turnout 11,52893.12-0.61
Registered electors 12,380

1925 election

1925 general election: Invercargill [13] [41] [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Joseph Ward 4,957 46.91
Reform James Hargest 4,79845.41
Labour Pat Hickey 8117.68
Majority1591.50-9.22
Informal votes550.52-0.34
Turnout 10,62193.73+3.44
Registered electors 11,332

1899 election

1899 general election: Invercargill [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Josiah Hanan 2,451 52.82
Liberal–Labour James Whyte Kelly 2,18947.18-2.07
Majority2625.65-7.08
Turnout 4,64079.94+1.02
Registered electors 5,804

1896 election

1896 general election: Invercargill [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal–Labour James Whyte Kelly 2,237 49.25 -17.98
Liberal John Sinclair 1,65936.53
Conservative William Benjamin Scandrett 64614.22
Majority57812.73-21.74
Turnout 4,54278.92+0.71
Registered electors 5,755

1893 election

1893 general election: Invercargill [45] [46]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal–Labour James Whyte Kelly 2,423 67.23 +25.48
Independent Joseph Hatch 1,18132.77
Majority1,24234.46+26.61
Turnout 3,60478.21+4.48
Registered electors 4,608

1890 election

1890 general election: Invercargill [47]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal–Labour James Whyte Kelly 633 41.75
Conservative James Walker Bain 51734.10
Liberal Henry Feldwick 36624.15
Majority1167.65
Turnout 1,51673.73
Registered electors 2,056

1878 by-election

1878 Invercargill by-election [48]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Henry Feldwick 230 51.22 +51.22
Independent James Walker Bain 21948.78+48.78
Majority112.45
Turnout 449

1875 election

1875 general election: Invercargill [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent George Lumsden 180 53.10 +53.10
Independent John Cuthbertson 15946.90−5.58
Majority216.19
Turnout 339

1873 by-election

1873 Invercargill by-election [50]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent John Cuthbertson 159 52.48
Independent William Wood 14447.52
Majority154.95
Turnout 303

1871 election

1871 general election: Invercargill [51]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent William Henderson Calder 142 61.21 +61.21
Independent George Lumsden 9038.79+38.79
Majority5222.41
Turnout 232

1866 election

1866 general election: Invercargill [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent William Wood 75 50.67
Independent Theophilus Heale 7349.32
Majority21.35
Turnout 148

Table footnotes

  1. Soper entered parliament twice as a list MP; on 5 April 2005 replacing Jonathan Hunt and on 14 February 2007 replacing Georgina Beyer.
  2. 1 2 Bond entered parliament as a list MP on 28 April 2015 after Winston Peters won the 2015 Northland by-election.
  3. 2017 Internet Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with Mana Party in the 2014 election
  4. 2017 Mana Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with the Internet Party in the 2014 election
  5. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.
  6. Percentage change calculated as a candidate for the Alliance Party in the 1999 election

Notes

  1. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 10. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  2. Scholefield 1950, p. 159.
  3. Scholefield 1950, p. 149.
  4. Scholefield 1950, p. 99.
  5. Scholefield 1950, p. 102.
  6. Scholefield 1950, p. 120.
  7. 1 2 3 4 Scholefield 1950, p. 105.
  8. Scholefield 1950, p. 94.
  9. Scholefield 1950, p. 112.
  10. "The New Parliament". Otago Witness (2232). 10 December 1896. p. 20. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  11. "The Invercargill Seat". Colonist. XLIII (9659). 12 December 1899. p. 3. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  12. 1 2 Scholefield 1950, p. 111.
  13. 1 2 The General Election, 1925. Government Printer. 1926. p. 5. Retrieved 20 November 2014.
  14. 1 2 3 4 Scholefield 1950, p. 146.
  15. 1 2 3 Bassett, Michael. "Ward, Joseph George 1856–1930". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 26 November 2011.
  16. Scholefield 1950, p. 103.
  17. "Obituary—N. P. H. Jones". VDIG group. Retrieved 25 November 2011.
  18. Berwick, Louise; Mcdougall, Nicci; Mcleod, Hannah (20 September 2014). "Soper won't stand again as Dowie wins city vote". The Southland Times . Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  19. "Official Count Results -- Invercargill (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 9 October 2017.
  20. "Official Count Results – Invercargill (2014)". Electoral Commission . Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  21. Invercargill results, 2011
  22. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 26 November 2011.
  23. 2008 election results Archived 11 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  24. "Official Count Results -- Invercargill". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  25. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place – Invercargill, 1996" (PDF). Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  26. "Part III – Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  27. "Part III – Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  28. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1993. p. 46.
  29. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990.
  30. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Norton 1988, p. 254.
  31. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Norton 1988, p. 253.
  32. "The General Election, 1949". National Library. 1950. pp. 1–5, 8. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  33. "The General Election, 1946". National Library. 1947. pp. 1–11, 14. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  34. "The General Election, 1943". National Library. 1944. p. 11. Retrieved 28 March 2014.
  35. "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. pp. 1–6. Retrieved 8 February 2012.
  36. The General Election, 1935. Government Printer. 1936. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  37. The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 3. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  38. "Invercargill Seat". The Evening Post . CX (44). 20 August 1930. p. 10. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  39. "General Election". The Evening Post . CVI (121). 27 November 1928. p. 14. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  40. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 3. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  41. "Missing Votes in Lyttelton Election". Auckland Star . LVI (LVI). 13 November 1925. p. 8. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  42. "Amended Results". The Evening Post . CX (117). 13 November 1925. p. 6. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  43. "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 3. Retrieved 12 February 2014.
  44. "Otago". Auckland Star . XXVII (305). 23 December 1896. p. 6. Retrieved 6 January 2014.
  45. "The General Election, 1893". National Library. 1894. p. 3. Retrieved 19 November 2013.
  46. "The General Election". Otago Daily Times . 28 November 1893. p. 6. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  47. "The General Election, 1890". National Library. 1891. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  48. "Invercargill Election". Grey River Argus. 21 (3097). 19 July 1878. p. 2. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  49. "Invercargill 25th December". The Evening Post . XII (152). 28 December 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  50. "The Invercargill Election". The Southland Times (1744). 23 May 1873. p. 2. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  51. "Invercargill Election". Daily Southern Cross . XXVII (4199). 28 January 1871. p. 2. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  52. "Invercargill Election". The Southland Times . 12 March 1866.

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