Wigram (New Zealand electorate)

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Wigram electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Wigram electorate, 2014.svg
Wigram electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Wigram is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Wigram is Megan Woods of the Labour Party. She took over this position from Jim Anderton, who had held this position from 1996 until 2011.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Megan Woods New Zealand politician

Megan Cherie Woods is the Labour Party Member of Parliament for the Wigram electorate of the New Zealand Parliament.

Contents

Population centres

Through an amendment in the Electoral Act in 1965, the number of electorates in the South Island was fixed at 25, an increase of one since the 1962 electoral redistribution. [1] It was accepted that through the more rapid population growth in the North Island, the number of its electorates would continue to increase, and to keep proportionality, three new electorates were allowed for in the 1967 electoral redistribution for the next election. [2] In the North Island, five electorates were newly created and one electorate was reconstituted while three electorates were abolished. [3] In the South Island, three electorates were newly created (including Wigram) and one electorate was reconstituted while three electorates were abolished. [4] The overall effect of the required changes was highly disruptive to existing electorates, with all but three electorates having their boundaries altered. [5] These changes came into effect with the 1969 election. [2]

South Island Southernmost of the two main islands in New Zealand

The South Island, also officially named Te Waipounamu, is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand in surface area; the other being the smaller but more populous North Island. It is bordered to the north by Cook Strait, to the west by the Tasman Sea, and to the south and east by the Pacific Ocean. The South Island covers 150,437 square kilometres (58,084 sq mi), making it the world's 12th-largest island. It has a temperate climate.

North Island The northern of the two main islands of New Zealand

The North Island, also officially named Te Ika-a-Māui, is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi), making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,749,200.

1969 New Zealand general election

The 1969 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of Parliament's 36th term. It saw the Second National Government headed by Prime Minister Keith Holyoake of the National Party win a fourth consecutive term.

Wigram is based around south-western Christchurch. The main suburbs in the seat are Spreydon, Hillmorton, Riccarton, Hornby and Sockburn. Following the 2013/2014 boundary review, it lost the suburb of Somerfield and parts of Hoon Hay to Port Hills. [6] The electorate's name comes from the suburb of Wigram, and by extension the former Wigram Aerodrome, itself named after colonial businessman Sir Henry Wigram.

Christchurch Metropolitan area in South Island, New Zealand

Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the seat of the Canterbury Region. The Christchurch urban area lies on the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. It is home to 404,500 residents, making it New Zealand's third-most populous city behind Auckland and Wellington. The Avon River flows through the centre of the city, with an urban park located along its banks.

Spreydon is a suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south-south-west of Cathedral Square. The most central street through Spreydon is Barrington Street. Spreydon is flanked by the suburbs Hoon Hay, Somerfield, and Lower Cashmere.

Riccarton, New Zealand Suburb

Riccarton is a suburb of Christchurch. It is due west of the city centre, separated from it by Hagley Park. Upper Riccarton is to the west of Riccarton. Vicki Buck is the Councillor for Riccarton.

History

The electorate had previously existed from 1969 to 1978, when it was held by Mick Connelly for Labour.

Mick Connelly New Zealand politician

Michael Aynsley (Mick) Connelly,, was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party, and a Cabinet Minister from 1972 to 1975 in the Third Labour Government.

Wigram was one of the original sixty-five Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) electorates created ahead of the 1996 election, when the number of South Island seats was reduced to sixteen. The formerly safe Labour seat of Sydenham lies at Wigram's core, and Labour's strong showing in the party vote in both 2002 and 2005, where the party won nearly half of all party votes cast, indicates that Wigram's political inclinations are left-leaning in nature. Its most well-known MP Jim Anderton was himself the Labour MP for Sydenham between 1984 and 1989, before he split from the party over its political directions and formed the NewLabour Party, which later merged into the Alliance; the Alliance disintegrated in 2002, but Anderton, by then the leader of the Progressive Party held off all challengers to easily hold the seat. In the 2011 election, the seat reverted to Labour candidate Megan Woods after his retirement, but the National Party comfortably won the party vote. [7] The chairman of the Canterbury-Westland branch of the National Party, Roger Bridge, stated in April 2014 that Woods had a low profile and the Wigram electorate was now "winnable". [8] Woods won re-election in the 2014 election with a more than a doubled majority. [9]

Mixed-member proportional (MMP) representation is a mixed electoral system in which voters get two votes: one to decide the representative for their single-seat constituency, and one for a political party. Seats in the legislature are filled firstly by the successful constituency candidates, and secondly, by party candidates based on the percentage of nationwide or region-wide votes that each party received. The constituency representatives are elected using first-past-the-post voting (FPTP) or another plurality/majoritarian system. The nationwide or region-wide party representatives are, in most jurisdictions, drawn from published party lists, similar to party-list proportional representation. To gain a nationwide representative, parties may be required to achieve a minimum number of constituency candidates, a minimum percentage of the nationwide party vote, or both.

1996 New Zealand general election

The 1996 New Zealand general election was held on 12 October 1996 to determine the composition of the 45th New Zealand Parliament. It was notable for being the first election to be held under the new mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system, and produced a parliament considerably more diverse than previous elections. It saw the National Party, led by Jim Bolger, retain its position in government, but only after protracted negotiations with the smaller New Zealand First party to form a coalition. New Zealand First's position as "kingmaker", able to place either of the two major parties into government, was a significant election outcome.

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

Members of Parliament

Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and started at general elections.

Key  Labour     Alliance     Progressive   

ElectionWinner
1969 election Mick Connelly
1972 election
1975 election
(Electorate abolished 1978–1996)
1996 election Jim Anderton
1999 election
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election Megan Woods
2014 election
2017 election

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Wigram [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

The incumbent is the current holder of an office. This term is usually used in reference to elections, in which races can often be defined as being between an incumbent and non-incumbent(s). For example, in the 2017 Hungarian presidential election, János Áder was the incumbent, because he had been the president in the term before the term for which the election sought to determine the president. A race without an incumbent is referred to as an open seat.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Megan Woods 17,00152.31+3.3613,82741.39+12.72
National David Hiatt12,40738.17+0.4513,76741.21-1.70
Green Richard Wesley1,6234.99-2.842,2396.70-6.12
NZ First Tane Apanui1,1863.651,9865.95-2.61
ACT Ruth Knights1250.38-0.691450.43-0.61
Independent Geoff McTague850.26
Economic EuthenicsTubby Hansen410.13-0.04
Democrats John Ring350.11-0.16170.05-0.05
Opportunities  9602.87
Māori  1340.40-0.07
Legalise Cannabis  1190.36-0.14
Conservative  980.29-3.32
United Future  320.10-0.18
People's Party  220.07
Ban 1080  230.07-0.06
Outdoors  210.06
Internet  90.03-0.73 [lower-alpha 1]
Mana  50.01-0.75 [lower-alpha 2]
Informal votes403146
Total Valid votes32,50333,404
Turnout 33,550
Labour holdMajority4,59414.13+2.90

2014 election

2014 general election: Wigram [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Megan Woods 14,51948.95+3.848,76428.67-1.94
National Karl Varley11,18937.72-2.5913,11742.91-1.64
Green Richard Wesley2,3247.83+0.073,91912.82-0.34
Conservative Mark Peters8472.86+0.341,1023.61+1.24
ACT Shaun Grieve3181.07+1.073171.04+0.41
Internet Mana Lois McClintoch2130.72+0.722310.76+0.56
Māori Te Whe Phillips1220.41+0.411450.47+0.03
Democrats John Ring790.27+0.27300.10+0.10
Economic EuthenicsTubby Hansen510.17+0.00
NZ First  2,6188.56+2.52
Legalise Cannabis  1540.50-0.08
United Future  860.28-0.50
Ban 1080  410.13+0.13
Civilian  310.10+0.10
Independent Coalition  70.02+0.02
Focus  50.02+0.02
Informal votes401136
Total Valid votes29,66230,567
Labour holdMajority3,33011.23+6.43

2011 election

2011 general election: Wigram [7]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Megan Woods 14,08045.11+29.979,86630.61-9.58
National Sam Collins12,58040.31+9.6514,35744.55+6.63
Green Richard Wesley2,4237.76+2.534,24313.16+6.22
Alliance Kevin Campbell 7932.54+2.381580.49+0.30
Conservative Mark Peters7852.52+2.527632.37+2.37
Legalise Cannabis Geoffrey McTague3371.08+1.081860.58+0.15
United Future Ian Gaskin1590.51-1.032510.78-0.23
Economic EuthenicsTubby Hansen530.17+0.09
NZ First  1,9486.04+3.05
ACT  2020.63-1.23
Māori  1410.44-0.13
Mana  660.20+0.20
Libertarianz  330.10+0.04
Democrats  160.05+0.01
Informal votes775305
Total Valid votes31,21032,230
Labour gain from Progressive Majority1,5004.81+34.16

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 45,427 [11]

2008 election

2008 general election: Wigram [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Progressive Green check.svgY Jim Anderton 15,32044.50-3.122,0105.73-0.73
National Marc Alexander 10,55330.66+8.5413,30837.91+8.75
Labour Erin Ebborn-Gillespie5,21415.15-3.9714,10840.19-7.76
Green Peter Taylor1,8025.23+2.512,4366.94+2.29
NZ First Steve Campbell4711.37-1.581,0502.99-0.88
ACT Matthew Gardiner3551.03+0.426531.86+1.11
Kiwi Lindsay Cameron3210.933220.92
United Future Vanessa Roberts2190.64-2.313551.01-2.86
Alliance Tom Dowie550.16-0.05680.19+0.03
Libertarianz Ben Morgan550.16220.060.00
Democrats John Charles Ring320.09130.040.00
Economic EuthenicsTubby Hansen280.08-0.01
Bill and Ben  2510.72
Māori  1980.56+0.29
Legalise Cannabis  1510.43+0.17
Family Party  830.24
Pacific  510.15
Workers Party  170.05
RONZ  50.01-0.01
RAM  10.00
Informal votes440291
Total Valid votes34,42535,102
Turnout 35,393
Progressive holdMajority4,76713.85-11.65

2005 election

2005 general election: Wigram [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Progressive Green check.svgY Jim Anderton 15,96147.62+11.942,1916.46
National Alison Lomax7,41322.12+8.279,89529.16
Labour Mike Mora6,40819.12-6.4516,27147.95
Green Richard Suggate1,4554.341,9675.80
United Future Vanessa Roberts9882.951,3133.87
NZ First Brian Roswell9122.721,5774.65
ACT Tetauru Emile2030.612550.75
Anti-Capitalist Alliance Sam Kingi690.21
Alliance Tom Dowie610.21550.16
Economic EuthenicsTubby Hansen290.09
Direct Democracy Anton Foljambe200.0650.01
Destiny  1120.33
Māori  900.27
Legalise Cannabis  890.26
Christian Heritage  520.15
Libertarianz  220.06
Democrats  150.04
RONZ  80.02
Family Rights  60.02
One NZ  40.01
99 MP  30.01
Informal votes716728
Total Valid votes33,51933,930
Progressive holdMajority8,54825.50+15.39

1999 election

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Wigram for a list of candidates.

1975 election

1975 general election: Wigram [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mick Connelly 9,617 49.70 -13.04
National Neil Russell7,65039.53
Values Karen Timpson1,1245.80
Social Credit Norman Davey9574.94+0.01
Majority1,96710.16-22.67
Turnout 19,34884.54-5.20
Registered electors 22,885

1972 election

1972 general election: Wigram [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mick Connelly 10,040 62.74 +6.54
National D G Cox4,78529.90
Social Credit Norman Davey7904.93
Values B C Lusher3181.98
New Democratic F W Stevens690.43
Majority5,25532.83+13.41
Turnout 16,00289.74+0.58
Registered electors 17,830

1969 election

1969 general election: Wigram [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Mick Connelly 9,258 56.20
National J R Dawson6,05836.77
Social Credit M McConnell1,1577.02
Majority3,20019.42
Turnout 16,47389.16
Registered electors 18,474

Table footnotes

  1. 2017 Internet Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with Mana Party in the 2014 election
  2. 2017 Mana Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with the Internet Party in the 2014 election

Notes

  1. McRobie 1989, pp. 108, 111, 112.
  2. 1 2 McRobie 1989, p. 111.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 107, 111.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 108, 112.
  5. McRobie 1989, pp. 111f.
  6. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 10. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  7. 1 2 "Official Count Results – Wigram (2011)". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. Retrieved 11 September 2014.
  8. Conway, Glenn (26 April 2014). "National sets sights on Wigram". The Press . p. A16. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  9. 1 2 "Official Count Results – Wigram (2014)". Electoral Commission. 4 October 2014. Retrieved 4 October 2014.
  10. "Official Count Results – Wigram (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  11. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  12. "Official Count Results – Wigram (2008)". Electoral Commission. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  13. "Official Count Results – Wigram (2005)". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  14. 1 2 3 Norton 1988, pp. 393.

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References